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May 29, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-29

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AT, MAY 29,1957

'1'HE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACEFWT

AT, MAY 29, 1957 TilE MICHIGAN DAILY PAC41 1~'TVI!

a v aJ . a LI

etermination, Humor To Aid Snyder in Mission

4

RAISE OF $12.50
Residence, Halls Board
Approves Reid roPrease
(Continued from Page 1)

By TAMMY MORRISON
When Dick Snyder leaves the
University, it will be to fulfill a
mission.
The mission is, at the moment,
only a general area-human rela-
tions-but the spirit behind it is
the one of dogged determination"
and high good humor that marked
his year as Daily Editor.
He isn't exactly sure how to go
about it, but "whatever I do, ei-
ther directly or indirectly,I want
to work for some progress in this
area. I consider human values
more important than anything
else-perhaps the most important
thing I've learned here, and I'd
like to contribute in some way to
the betterment of human rela-
tions."
Human Relations
In the area of human rela-
tions, "the country is more or less
static. We're not moving forward
at the, rate we should be. It's such
a big problem that people want to
leave it alone."
Concern for social thinking
doesn't stop with the problem of
human relations; Dick's preoccu-
pation is with the whole of what
he calls "the scheme of perverted
American values. Human relations
is the chief thing, but I'm a little
bit disturbed by our desire not to
speak our minds for fear of losing
social status."
Dick frankly admits that his
view of the way people should be-
have can be attacked as too ideal-
istic, but thinks that, in many
ways, idealism is more practical
than "so-called realism. We don't
have to admit that, just because
things are that way, they should
be."
Although he's sure of his avoca-
tion, his vocation is as yet some-
what vague. In an effort to clarify
it for himself, he's entering Har-
vard Divinity School on a Rocke-
feller Brothers' Theological Fel-
lowship.
"There's a great need for clergy-
Regents Pass
Bylaw Change
A University Senate membership,
bylaw revision, approved by the
Regents Saturday, will eliminate
former bylaw alteration whenever
a major office is created in the
administration.

-Daily-Dick Qaskill
DICK SNYDER
... doggedly determined

men who are more worldly than'
usual-more concerned with gov-
ernment and social action. I thinkj
a clerical vocation would be a good'
way of doing the things I men-
tioned, but it's still more a strong
curiosity than a real interest.
What's more, it'll give me my first'
chance to study without any ob-
ligation-financial or otherwise
and determine whether or not I'm
suited for graduate work."
Switch in Majors
A switch in majors at the end
of his junior year has brought him
to the threshold of another pos-
sibility - teaching. Originally in
economics, he changed to English
without quite knowing why. "But
I do know why I switched out of
econ-either I had exhausted all
the interesting courses, or they ex-
hausted me.
"I didn't know enough about lit-
erature, and I wanted to learn
something." Satisfied with the
change, he found that when he be-
gan English, he also began ques-
tioning his own ideas. "Now, I've
given teaching serious thought
and still might do it."
His time-consumirg job as Edi-
tor-comprising not only heading
the paper but being a hard-work-
ing, outspoken member of Stu-
dent Government Council - left
him with little time to accumu-
late an imposing grade-point av-
erage.
He's fond of one story about a
professor, known for his scorn of

things non-academic, who taught'
one of his early English courses
and was familiar with the cycle of
late papers and little reading com-
mon to people in activities.
The same professor substitute-
taught one lecture in another Eng-
lish course Dick took last semes-
ter.
He walked into the class of 75
and announced that he would lec-
ture on Pope's "Epistle to Dr. Ar-
buthnot" if enough of the class
members had read it. Then he
turned pointedly to Dick and
asked, "Mr. Snyder, have you read
it?"
Amazing Answer
Amazingly enough, Dick was
able to answer, "Yes, sir."
The professor smiled grimly and
said, "Well, I'll go ahead then. If
Mr. Snyder has read it, I guess the
rest of you have."
Ironically enough, h o w e v e r,
Dick's entry into activities has giv-
en him a deep appreciation of the
academic side of the University.
His favorite staff-meeting com-
ments, unlike those of most of his
predecessors, did not emphasize
devotion to The Daily above all.
"You're here to get an education
and that means primarily in class.
You have to study, and you can't
study if you spend all of your time
here."
Something Missing
"There's something missing" if
it has to be an activity that gives
a student an appreciation of the
scholarly. "It seems to me that the
school-proper should do this. If
the size of the University has made
impossible giving students oppor-
tunity to question, look over ideas,
share hopes and ambitions with
their professors-well, draw your
own conclusions.
"I'm democratic, but there's too
much., concentration on the stu-
dent who doesn't have the interest
or ability to do good work!" Coun-
selors should focus their atten-
tion, he feels, on the fairly good
student who isn't stimulated
enough to develop a real interest
in the academic --- the middle
group. "Lots of students don't go
into honors programs because
they're not stimulated. These are
the people the University should
be concerned about."
There are gaps in the Michigan
student's education that The Daily
.has been able to fill, and "it's not

inconceivable that these gaps
should and could be filled with less
reliance on activities. Though
maybe things would have turned
out all right if I'd stayed strictly
a student-maybe it's a myth I'm
building up."
Academic Importance
Of course, he admits, The Daily
does have certain academic ad-
vantages, and one is a gain in good
faculty associations that it takes
other students a longer time to
build up. "That's the biggest fac-
tor in getting a student to devote
himself to academic work-know-
ing some faculty members who are
really interested in scholarly work,
but whose personalities aren't like
the frosted glass doors they sit
behind."
The paradox of being a mediocre
student with a firm conviction
that the academic is supreme
doesn't bother Dick. His needs lay
with The Daily, and he chose that
way. But he feels that most stu-
dent activities don't justify the
loss of study opportunity.
'No Call for SAB'
For instance, he is convinced
that there is "no call" for the new
Student Activities Building. "The
needs of the University should be
prioritized. A greater contribu-
tion is being made on the other
side of State'Street. Not that I'm
basically opposed to activities, but
they should be doing more for the
individual. Of course, that's a dan-
gerous position for people on The
Daily to hold."
Dick was born in Richmond,
Virginia, 21 years ago, and now

assistant and was, until his deci-
sion to enter Harvard, the upcom-
ing Resident Adviser.
Absorbs Spirit
Living in Gomberg made it easy
to absorb some of the Michigan
spirit, but not necessarily in the
"Rah Rah" sense of the word.
That spirit has evolved into a
genuine concern about where the
University is going and what it's'
going to do when it gets there, a
concern reflected on The Daily's
editorial page and in his liberal,
outspoken and humorous tenure as
a member of SGC.
As he sees it, ever-growing en-
rollment is the University's big-
gest problem, but "it's hard toi
prove, bad effects from rising en-
rollment. However, the University
should make more provision for
top faculty members. I'd like to
see a local program similar to the
national Woodrow Wilson Fellow-
ships to interest, recruit and train
the faculty Michigan and other'
schools are .going to need. We're
not producing enough graduate
students to replenish and increase
faculties. With growing size, the
faculty-student ratio should de-
crease rather than remain static."
Sure of Goals
Thoughtful and serious, while at
the same time never forgetting the
value of a sense of humor, Dick
Snyder's future may be vague, but
his goals are not.
"I'm not certain what I want to
do, but I am certain what I want
to stay away from-no corporate
business for me. I guess what I
really want is to think on my own
and contribute ideas."

fairs James Lewis said that an in-
crease in the rates could not be
determined and announced earlier
because the legislative appropria-
tions, which will determine the
University's salary budget, were
not made until last weekend.
Increase in Staff
In answer to a question he said
the staff in men's Residence Halls
will be increased next year but
declined to give a definite number.
Contracts will be distributed
"Just as fast as possible," accord-
ing to Lewis. Residence Hall busi-
ness manager Leonard Schaadt
said it will take a while to type
in the new rates.
Rates at co-operative houses
Adelia Cheever and Geddes will be
increased $15 per semester while
rates at Fletcher will go up four
dollars per semester.

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
DAILY EDITOR
s...smiling and serious

No meals are served at Fletcher,
Resideits of Geddes and Cheever
share the work of the house.
Other Schools Up Also
Shiel told the Board that rates
at Other Big Ten schools have
risen from $25 to $105 for next
year. He quoted these rates for a
double room at other schools:
Ohio State University - $795
per year; Indiana - $745; Iowa-
$700; Illinois - $780; Michigan
State - either $756 or $765; and
Wisconsin - $780. He pointed out,
however, that frequently these
costs do not include such items as
maid and laundry service and
staff counselors.
It was announced that the Resi-
dence Hall Rate Study Committee,
established when room rates were
hiked last year, will issue a re-
port next fall. Shiel is chairman
of the group.

lives in Fayetteville, New York,
"According to the New York State
Department of Public Works, it's
the boyhood home of Grover
Cleveland. I like the town better
than Ann Arbor-the people are
tolerable, although perhaps not so
tolerant." He came to the Univer-
sity for three reasons: ("in order
of importance") it was cheaper
than Cornell, had a good Law
School and better freshman hous-
ing.
His attachment to it has grown
less wholly practical. A resident of
South Quad's infamous Gomberg
House in his freshman year, he
became its president, later staff

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6:35 P.M. Monday thru-Friday
1600 WHRV 1600

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We offer tasteful, beautiful wed-
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printed, embossed, or engraved and
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Sunday

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)y
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 1 1:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenow Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wm. S. Baker, Campus Minister
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY
Worship Services 9:00 A.M., 10:30 A.M., 12 noon
(Last Sunday for three services)-
11:30 A.M. Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room.
7-10:00 P.M. Open House at Student Center.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School
11:00 Morning Worship
6:00 Student Guild
7:00 Evening Service.
Wednesday-8:00 P.M.-Prayer Meeting
WE WELCOME YOU!
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Thursday at 7:30 P.M.: Ascension Day Vesper
Service, with sermon by the Rev. Harold Besel,
Asst. Chaplain, Univ. Hospital.
Sunday services at 9:15 A.M. & '10:45 A.M.
Supper-Program Sunday at 6:00 P:M.

Iam6aj /tl$8reri, inc.
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS, STATIONERS
119 E. Liberty Phone NO 8-7900

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you'll find in
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shaping is slender and expen-
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you really guess the price, if
we didn't tell you? $25. Just
one of many.
by

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
Church School and Junior Church at 10:45 A.M.
Public worship at 10:45.
Student Guild will meet at Guild House at 5:30 for
a picnic outing and outside Vespers.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
1917 Washtenow Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Family Sunday.
10:00 No adult discussion group or Church School.
11:00 Nursery Group.
11:00 Family Services: Sermon: "Invitation to
Creativity" by Dr. Redman.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays 10:00 A.M. - 11:00"A.M. - 7:30
P.M.
Wednesdays 7:30 P.M. Bible Study. Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays 5:00 to 5:30 P.M.
For transportation to Service-Dial NO 3-5134.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday -- 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.: Worship Services
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
7:00 P.M. Informal Lutheran Student Assn.
Meeting.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY IN
ANN ARBOR
New Quarters: 106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Listen to Radio Theosophy: Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc)
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