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May 28, 1957 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-28

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TUESDAY, MAY 28, 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

TUESDAYne MAY\ 28,r 1957 I!\THE MICHIGAN DAILY ns" PA V" s lf 3 n n n i ae w. " w

a av . ra .

,.

SERVES UNDER SIX PRESIDENTS:
WUOM Director Sees 'U' History

COMBINES MEDICINE,

PHYSICAL EDUCATION:

Dr. Bell To Retire After Colorful Career

By SARAH DRASIN
Not many men have seen as
much University history go by as
Prof. Waldo ;Abbot of the speech
department, retiring director of
WUOM, University Broadcasting
Service.
From his student days in the
early 1900's, to the present, Prof.
Abbot has "served under" six Uni-
versity presidents and has
watched his broadcasting service
grow from a University "step-
child" to a "full-grown" operation.
"There's just so much that's
happened around here since we
began this enterprise," he noted,
"it would take days to tell about.
I can sure tell you about some of
my experiences though." he
mused.
Started in 1925
"It all started a long time ago
in, 1925," he began, "when Ed
Kraus who was then dean of the
pharmacy school gave us the idea
of broadcasting from the Univer-
sity. I think the only reason that
I was chosen director at that
time," he went on, "was because
' -owned the only radio set in
town.",,
' Prof. Abbot was also at that
time associate editor of the
"Michigan Alumnus." Having re-
ceived both his A.B. and L.L.B.
degrees from the University, he
served as assistant prosecutor of
Washtenaw County, a World War
I officer and an English instruc-
tor at the University before being
appointed director of the Univer-
sity Broadcasting Service.
"Our first studio was on the
fifth floor of old University Hall,"
Prof. Abbot reminisced. "I can
think of only two reasons why we
happened to get that room - it
had a rug in it and it was too
far- for students to walk to for
classes."
Studio Redecorated
The radio "pioneer" was not
, discouraged, however, and fixed
up the studio with painter's drop
!cloths and a piano. Programs were
recorded there and broadcasted
over radio station WJR in Detroit.
"We had mostly speaking pro-
grams in those days," he went on.
"We recorded men like Yost, Ef-
finger and Little - good men and
good speakers, all of them - and
all of them gone now," he added
a bit sadly.
The four foot square University
hail studio was the scene of sev-
e ral "itretn adventures,"
Prof. Abbot relates. At one time,
a rattlesnake in a box was banged
against the microphone to pro-
duce sound effects.
Sound Effects
Upon another occasion, several
bears were lead in and goaded to
make them angry enough to growl
-also for sound effects.
From the studio in University
Hall, the broadcasting service
moved to Morris Hall which stood
on the present site of the Admin-
istration Building. Being also a
rather old building,, Prof. Abbot
WA remembered that they used to
- send someone in early every day
to "check the beams.
"That was some place," he
mused, "but I had fun ana so did
r; the kids who helped me. In fact,"
he continued, "some of those 'kids'
are making better money' than I
am!"
He cited several of his "alumni"
Organization
Notices
Michigan Union, Senior Table Carv-
ing will extend through the end of the
semester; a table is reserved in the
South Cafeteria; carving tools may be
picked up at the basement check room
by leaving ID cards there until tools
are returned.
The Congregational and Disciples
Student Guild, mid-week tea, May 28,
4:30-:00 p.m., Guild House.

Michigan Square Dancers, program of
square and couple dancing, Grey Austin
calling, May 28, 7:30-10:00, Lane Hall.
* * *
The Episcopal Student Foundation,,
student-faculti tea at Canterbury
House, May 28, 4:00-6:00, 218 N. Division.
The Episcopal Student Foundation,
breakfast at Canterbury House follow-
ing the 7:00 a.m. celebration of Holy
Communion at the Church, May 29.
I d

cess, is the establishment of a
"satellite" station in Flint. An-
other measure of success ... fan
mail for manj> of WUOM's pro-
grams.
Receives Recognition
For his many years of service
for the University Broadcasting
Service, Prof. Abate has received
much ecognition.
In a citation from the National
Associa< ion of Educational Broad-
casters, Prof. Abbot is cited for
"significant and meritorious con-
tributions to educ tional broad-
casting." i think that that's about
the r icest thing that has hap-
pened to me in my career." he
said
A similar citation was awarded
to Prof. Abbot by the Michigan
State Medical Society in thanks
for his "efforts in behalf of bet-
ter public health education for
the citizens of this state."
WUOM's Awards
In addition to these personal
awards, WUOM, under Prof. Ab-
bot's direction, has received 19
awards from the Institute for
Education by Radio and three
grants-in-aid totaling $19,000
from the Educational Television
and Radio Center.
After such an active career and
being so close to retirement, the
inevitable question of what he
will do afterward comes up.
Settling back in his chair, Prof.
Abbot smiled. "I'm 'goin' fishin',"
he said.

I

By MARY BETH GODFROY

A vigorous, grey-haired woman
who knew at the age of twelve
that she wanted a double career
of medicine and physical educa-
tion, is retiring after 34 years on
the University of Michigan facul-
ty and Health Service staff.
Dr. Margaret Bell, chairman of
the Department of Physical Edu-
cation for Women and physician
at Health Service, can now lean
back in her chair and recall how
the University has grown since
she first accepted a teaching posi-
tion in 1923.
All in One Gym
"Then women had no facilities
except Barbour Gymnasium, she
reminisced. "Offices of the Dean
of Women were in the Gym, and
history lectures were held in the
dance studio. There was no League
building and the present Palmer
Field was an old field with only
lour tennis courts. Women have
so much more o~p' rtunity' now
than they had whe. I first came
to the Jnrivcrnitv." she, continue:;.
Dr. Bell's first introduction to
medicine was a sul.i, ription to
the American Medical Journal, a
gift from her father.
Pursuing her ambition, Dr. Bell
received a bachelor dctgree from
Sargent School of Physical Edu-
cation in 1910, bachelor of science
degree from the University of Chi-
cago in 1915, and her medical de-
gree from the Rush Medical
School iA g1921.
While attending the University

Dr. Bell would like to come back
to Ann Arbor - "it would be hard
to leave after so many years here."
she admits with a simle - and
to work in the medical field, "but
not private practice, it's too de-
manding."
Eyes twinkling, she switches the
conversation to her two favorite
organizations, Women's Athletic
Association and the Major's Club
in Physical Education.
"Pet Groups"
These, she confides with a grin,
are her 'pet groups" because they
give coeds the chance to develop
leadership skills and qualities she
believes essential to every woman's
education.
Women on campus have recog-
nized Dr. Bell's efforts to assist
them whenever she can with her
friendly advice and guidance. Wo-
men's honories, Mortarboard in
1956, and Senior Society in 1957,
tapped her for honorary member-
ship.
Dr. Bell has also published
medical articles in state and na-
tional journals of medicine and
education.

SWEE 's
Diaper $ervito
NATIONAL.'S
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DIAPER SERVICE
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-Daily-David Arnold
DR. MARGARET BEL,-retiring after 34 years with the University.

WALDO ABBOT
... retiring director

who "made good." They include
Peter Arnell, '41, a television pro-
ducer in New York who has con-
tributed $4000 to the broadcasting
service; Ward Quaal, '41, who is
with radio station WGN in Chi-
cago; John Gelder, '40, president
of a radio station in West Virginia
and Robert Q. Lewis, who at-
tended the University from 1938-
40 and went on to become a well-
known celebrity.
From Morris Hall, the studio
was moved to the fourth floor of
Angell Hall where the speech de-
partment studios are now located,
and from there to it's present lo-
cation on the fifth floor of the Ad-
ministration Building.
During that time, the activities
and the content of the service
changed also. More and more
equipment was purchased, speech
students began participating in
programs and in 1948, the service
was licensed as radio station
WUOM.
Services 65 Stations
At present, WUOM provides
programs for 65 commercial sta-.
tions. Included in its format are
musical, dramatic and educational
programs.
One of the station's most suc-
cessful programs has been the
"Festival of Song," which teaches*
singing to rural children through
radio.
A measure of the station's suc-

of Chicago and medical school,
the energetic student also carried
full-time physical e d u c a t i o n
teaching responsibilities.
During her years on the Uni-
versity faculty, Dr. Bell has fol-
lowed through the heavy sched-
ule. She has taken part in state,
regional and national committees
for health, physical education,
recreation and defense programs.
With these "extracurricular ac-
tivities" she has still managed to
chair the women's physical edu-
cation department and serve as
a physician at Health Service.
For her many contributions to
medicine and physical education,
many organizations have cited Dr.
Bell. She has been listed in Who's
Who in America, Who's Who inj
Medicine and Who's Who in Edu-
cation.
Anticipates Retirement
Dr. Bell is now looking forward
to retirement in August, when she
plans a trip to Europe. Trout fish-
ing in Spain and Portugal, as well
as "plenty of swimming and sail-
ing," are on the agenda for the ac-
tive doctor-teacher. Shortly after

her return here in December,
she'll "be off again", this time to
the South until April.
When her travels are finished,

If

Events Around Campus

ca pea
SF " v
{L
St { S" S
r :1 ")rr" i.

zio 's summer skimmer
is sunlight on your feet a soft streak
of kid and a wafer-thin heel, beautifully
teamed for almost-barefoot comfort.

DELTA SIGMA PI - Antonio
W. Diokno, Grad., has received
the Delta Sigma Pi scholarship
key for 1957, according to Carl
Pingel, '57BAd
This award is giver annually to
the student who maintains the
highest scholastic average while
working on an M.B.A. degree,
Diokno's over-all point average
was 3.98.
SAILIING CLUB -- The mem-
bers of the University Sailing Club
recently elected Robert Cary as
commodore of the organization.
Other officers are Dexter Thede,
vice-commodore; Mary Johns,
secretary; Nancy Wehner, treas-
urer; Oho Scherer, fleet captain;
Steffen Galazzi, buildin-7 andr
grounds chairman, and Bruce
Goldsmith, race chairman.
* * *
ORIENTATION LEADERS -
Barry Shapiro, '58, announced
that the men selected as orienta-

tion leaders will be notified by
mail early this summer.
UNION - Union study facilities
which will be available to men
during the exam period include
the Pendleton Library and Rms.
A, B and C on the third floor as
well as the coffee shop, pool room
and bowling alleys.

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Ann Arbor Phone NO 8-6019

FINAL
Opportunity for June Graduates
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