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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 26, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

EYrTiA~,' ~RA~ AB ~a~w

Hoosiers

W~ e

Cinder

Crown;,

Wolverines

Third

Major League

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Chicago 21 8 .724
Cleveland 19 12 .613
New York 19 12 .613
Detroit 17 17 .500
Boston 17 17 .500
Bansa rCity 15 19.441
Washington 9 27 .250

GB
3
3
63/
6% 1
81/s
1514

Cinc
Mihw
Broc
PhiL
St.
Pitts

Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
innati 23 11 .676
~aukee 20 11 .645
klyn 19 12 .613
adeiphia 18 13 .581
Louis 14 17 .452
York 15 19.4
,burgh 8 23 .258

May Triumphs in Hurdles;
Davis High with 15 Points

GB
11,4
2%
3%
7Y2
13%

BL UE NOTEOS
BJohn Hillyer

L.

I ~ U

Yesterday's Scores
Kansas City 5, Detroit
Chicago 4, Cleveland 0
New York 8, Washington 1
Baltimore 12, Boston 0

3

Today's Games
Chicago at Cleveland (2) -- Pierce
and Wilson vs. Daley and Tomanek.
Washinigton at New York (2) -
Pacarsand Abernathy vs. Turley
Boston at Baltimore (2) - Stone
and Sisler vs. Fornieles and Moore.
Dtroit at Kansas City - Maas vs.

- Yesterday's Scores
St. Louis, Cincinnati (rain)
New York 8, Brooklyn 7
Milwaukee 7, Chicago 6
Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 6
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Chicago (2) - Conley
and Pizarro vs. Drott and Singleton.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (2) --
Law and Pepper vs. Simmons and
St. Louis at Cincinnati -- Merrit
vs. Jeffcoat-
New ork at Brooklyn - Gomez

Gift epa ~idI
SUNDAY at 8:00 only
with
Ac Gunness Yvonne DeCorlo
A RCH IT ECT U RE AU D ITOR IUM
50c

By AL JONES
Special to The Daily
EVANSTON-Indiana, aided by
Greg Bell's 13 points and Willie
May's surprising sweep of both
hurdles, crushed all opposition
here yesterday to win the Big Ten
outdoor track title by an over-
whelming 20-point margin.
The crown, added to the indoor
title they annexed from Michigan
last March, was the first sweep
for the Hoosiers since 1941.
OSU Seondg
Behind Indiana came Ohio
State with 32 points, 15 of them
compliments of Glen Davis-who,
for the first time in his life, failed
to win a single event in a Confer-
ence track meet.
After Ohio came Michigan, a
not sosurprising third in a com-
points.
Illinois Improved its last place
standing of the indoor campaign
as it came up with 19 points to
take fourth, Michigan State and
Purdue tied for fifth with 10 each,
Minnesota, Iowa and Northwest-
ern tied for sixth with 15 apiece
and Wisconsin finished dead last
with nine points.
One Record
A scggy track, product of all-
morning rains, kept the times
down and only one new Confer-
ence record was set-that by Al
Ur8 tkos brakthe old hihjmp
standard by one and one-half
inches.
Tiwo other possible record break-
ers, Bell and Dave Owen of Michi-
gan both fell well short of their
marks.
A leg injury to Bell kept him
from the broad jump pit yesterday
but Friday's preliminary leap of
25'3%" was enough to win the
event.

However, Bell's injury could not
also keep him off the track and
he picked up the remainder of his
13 points by finishing second to
Willie Fowler of Northwestern in
the 100-yd. and 200-yd. dashes.
Owen took Michigan's only first
place by winning the shot with a
54'3" effort, but as in the indoors
last March he again failed to
break the Conference record he
so greatly desired.
Davis Disappoints
But if the day was a disap-
pointment for Owen it was a big-
ger flop for the Buckeyes' Davis
evn thoug he so red 15 points.
the low hurdles and given a good
chance at the highs, Davis found
himself up against a man who
didn't read press notices and who
beat him handily in both events.
Besides Owen six other Michi-
gan men and the mile relay squad
aided the Wolverines to their 25
point total.
Coach Don Canham said he was
"very satisfied" with the team's
performance and he paid special
tribute to the performances of Lou
Williams, Robin Varian and Laird
Sloan. a s
Willim Improves
The ever-improving Williams
earned his varsity letter by placing
third in the broad jump with a
23'ur/4 leap. Robin Varian placed
and Sloan wound up third in the
440-yd. dash.
The other Michigan places went
to Brendan O'Reilly who was third
in the high jump at 6'4%", Dick
Flodin, fourth in the 220-yd. dash,
and Hellmar Dollwet who finished
third in the mile behind Iowa's
Deacon .Thnes and Bob Dintel-
mann of imnois.
Later Jones came back to win
the'two mile to become the meet's
third double winner.
Netiters A dvance
Patty and Her Flamadvancedg t
the fourth round of the French
International Tennis Tournament
yesterday.

-Daly-David Asnold
TRAGEDY IN VICTORY-Dave Owen won his eighth straight
Big Ten shot put crown at Evanston yesterday with a heave of
54'8", but, unexpectedly, he failed to break Charley Fonville's
Conference record of 56'5", Just as he failed to break Fonville's
mark in the indoor's last March.

Hail an Faewl

MM

~fl.*.*.wt~t.An~;trn.V..~fl-.tfl*.A... . . ~

TodysMveGie

Il D ALSNODEATH36S
Oti THEIR MIIDS. / ~
THE MOST A
MOTIOt4 PCT URE Tn ar on t r
iti VEASI manfor murder - and FO D
what you see anand hear
will shock you, stun
you -and then the
- awesome power to kill--
wil suddenly ~
~ - into youn Y
hands! -
PLEASE
see i t
-f rom the
beginning!
added * BUGS BUNNY mn 'EEVLE RABT
winkingly give you
the lowdown on the
CINEMA5COPE
COLOR by 03 LXE
Everyone Knows
AL ~ .the fun is at the
Held A pICTURE THAI IS
MAAKES TE HAIRS
Over s.... T HE B AC O
AT THE T H E ECK R ISE'
DIAL NO 8-6416 tx

MILE RUN - 1) Charles Jones,
Ioa 2) Bob Dl teman, Illinois,
Crawford Kennedy, Michigan State,
5) Arnie Beck, Minnesota. 4:17.
consin, 2) Hr Caf fey Indiana,
3) Laird Sloan, MICHIGAN, 4) Ben
King, Purdue, 5) Ted Storer, Ohio
State. :48.8.
100-YD.-DASH -- Willmer Fowler,
Northwstern,2 GrBell, Indiana,
Berry Williams, Indiana, 5) Bill
BROADJUM s-a :) Greg Bell, In-
dianax (25'3%"), 2) Glen Davis, Ohio
State (24'i4"), 3) Louis Williams,
DonaHldson, Indiana (23'6, 5) Bl
Garner, Minnesota (22'8:34"). i
120-YD. HIGH HURDLES -- 1)
State, 4) Tom Campbell, Indian;,
I5) Jack Mathews, Iowa. :14.5.
880-YD.RUN -- Dave Lean, Michi-
gan State, 2) John Miller, Indiana,
3) Jack McClain, Ohio State, 4)
Robn arian, MICHIGAN, 5) George
220-YD. RUN --1) Wilimer Fowl-
eNorthwestern,D2) Gregh BellIn-
4) Dick Flodin, MICHIGAN, 5) Ber-
SHOT P T 1 aid Owen,
MICHIGAN (54'3") 2) Robert Henry,
Indina<5'1"), 4) Larry Stewat,

Illinois (52'6"), 5) Sam Eliowitz,
Michigan State (50'7".A)Ubnks
Illinois (6'8: "), 2) Sam Mylin, Wis-
consin (6' 5%"), 3) Brendan O'Reli-
, Ilinois (637/3) 5)(TIE) Stan
Lyons, Ohio State and Wayne Mile-
stone, Ohio State (6'27/").
TWO-MILE RUN - 1) Charles
Jones, Iowa, 2) Selwyn Jones, Mich-
in State,G3 Bud Edelen Minne-
State, 5) Tony Pentino, Indiana.
220-YARD LOW HURDLES - 1)
Willie May, Indiana, 2) Glenn Da-
vis, Ohio State, 3) Jacke Mathews,
5) Dick Stillwagon, urue. :23.5
ONE-MILE RELAY -- 1) Indiana
(Berry Williams, Craig Toensing,
Pu-rde 3) Mihnd4) Nrthet
ern, 5) Michigan State. 3:18.7.
POLE VAULT -- 1) Stan Lyons,
Ohio State (14 feet), 2) Billy Jones,
Purdue and James Johnston, Pur-
due (13-8), 3) Jimn Weaver, Ohio
Sate, Georg Best Michiga State
Breanlon Donaldson, Indiana (tie.)
(1DISCUS THROW FINAL--l) Dale
Yonkey, Minnesota, (159'4 ") 2)
4) Ted Caiazza, Illinois, (149' 9", 5)
Jams oun, ow,<(18'9").

]ICHIGAN called him "The Rlock of Gibraltar." Michigan opponents
called him a lot of things which will never break into print. Both
parties called him the things they did for the same reason, however:
He did everything in his power to whale the daylights u fMci
gan's foes. And in his case, everything in his power meant quite a bit.
giHe was there yesterday at Evanston. It's doubtful if his participa-
ton had much effect on the deciding of the Big Ten track meet's
outcome, but he was there and he was probably the best athlete
on the field and he was competing as an amateur for the last time.
Competing for Michigan for the last time. People paid attention.
His last performance in Michigan colors. It does seem odd to think
in such terms, doesn't it? No more crashing tackles, booming punts, or
incredible pass-grabs on those notsy Saturdays in the fall; no ,more
rally-killing rebounding or 20-pt. nights on the Yost court. Whether
he was number 87 or number 27 (depending on the sport), his
presence, usually more than that of any other athlete on hand, was
felt. When he was in there, your eyes just naturally followed him,
whether he was scoring a touchdown or a basket (which happened
pretty often) or falling on his face (which happened not so often),
What then, will it be like with-
out him around? Of course, Michi-. .
gan will continue to have winning
athletic teams and losing ones,
Sjust as she had when he was carry- .
Ing the torch. The school itself
certainly won't collapse, either,
and the high ,educational stand- ~ ' C ~ ..~\
,ards associated with the University
will presumably continue. Mason
Hall will still be here. So will the
Engine Arch. Perhaps the void
which will be left by the departure
of the big man can best be meas-
ured by asking those who had ....
contact with him what they ~
thought of him.
He wasn't what you would cail
a standout track and field per.
former, but track coach Don Can-
ham has this to say: "If he ever
concentrated on the shot or dis-
cu ,ed have been great. As It
is, he throws the shot 52' without "'
much practice. If he would workRO
o it, he could better 56'. And o h ieie
of course, he's a great competitor." *. *ntesieie
He was probably the finest football end in college ranks to play
during his own lifetime. And yet, according to Varsity end coach
Matt Patanelli, "You would have thought he was one of the fellows
trying to make the team. He was very cooperative in every respect and
always willing to learn. Whether in practice or In a game,. he
was constantly striving to improve.
People sometimes tended to overlook his basketball ability, but
Varsity coach Bill Perigo says, "He could have made several All.
American teams. He always missed the first six weeks of practice,
of course, and would thus ,fail to hit his peak until the season was
almost over.
Not only his coaches were impressed. Walter B. Rea, Dean of Men,
asserted that "his presence on the field boosted the morale of the entire
team and gave them the necessary drive. You could see this very clearly
last fall in the last half of the Iowa game. He went around, urging
everyone on. I feel this was a definite factor in the winning drive.
'The Psychologica 1 Edge .. .'
"IT WAS true even at the Minnesota game two years ago when he
couldn't play because of an injury. His presence on the sidelines
seemed to provide his teammates with the psychological edge. You
could see he was a natural leader."
Speaking of the alleged unsportsmanlike conduct of the 1955 Ohio
State football contest, Dean Rea emphasized that "I could see nothing
in the carful study f the films afterward which warranted his ejec-
tion from the game,'and in talking to him, I received his word that
he neither struck the Ohio ball-carrier nor said anything to the official
which would have dictated such a penalty.".
He added, "I think that the way he carried on quietly and effec-
tively after the incident, in the face of much criticism, while still
maintaining his high degree of competitive intensity, shows a con-
siderable amount of poise."
Re's been through the mill-of that there is no question. He has
been praised and cursed, as is the tendency of anyone as much in
the spotlight as he has been. But he's come out of it admirably. His
head hasn't grown in the least.
So Ron Kramer is leaving now. Michigan watches him part with
regret. Her opponents watch with joy in their hearts. And I can't
say as I blame either side.

C

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