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May 25, 1957 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1957-05-25

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"Mr. Stassen Will Now Explain Our Position"

I

Sixty-Seventh Yeer
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241

5 15

'Whien Opinilons Are Fre~e
Truthb Wil Prevail'

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers or
the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
SATURDAY, MAY 25, 1957 NIGHT EDITOR: RICHARD TAUB

/

SGC Enrollment Committee
Must Be Alert to Subtleties

STUDENT GOVERNMENT CODUNCIL'S ac-
Stion Wednesday in calling for the establish-
ment of a student-faculty-administration com-
mittee to study the effects of rising enrollments
may well turn out to be one of the Council's
most significant actions in its two-year history.
The results of the action will riot be appar-
ent for many months. But if a top-flight com-
mittee is appointed by SGC, the Faculty Senate
and President Hatcher, and if -it conducts a
thorough-study, it could prove a potent force
in shaping the University's educational policy.
Rising enrollments are the number one edu-
cational problem in America today. A sharp
and -sustained increase in the birth rate of
the students now reaching college age and a
steadily increasing percentage of college at-
tendance by those students have conspired to
present the nation's colleges with the alterna-
tives doubling in size in a generation or failing
to educate the nation's interested youth.
FACULTY RESOURCES - the number of
trained men entering the teaching profes-
sion - show every sign of falling hopelessly
behind in the attempt to keep pace with the
growing student population.
The prospect for 20 years from now is edu-
cational factories on a scale far beyond any
in existence today. The University's projected
enrollment figures of 40,000 or more by 1970
are illustrative of the general trend, and the
general sharp decline of American academic
levels, never outstanding by European stan-
dards, seems inevitable.
The questiton before the new committee is
not, however, the status of American education
in general; its decline is inevitable. The ques-
tion is more realistically the role the Univer-
sity is to play amidst the decline, and how
greatly the school's much-discussed obligation
to the state will sweep it along with the tide.
The SGC study committee which recom-
mended the establishment of.the new tripartite
group has outlined a number of aspects of the
problem. The University's responsibility to the
state, for example, is deserving of considerable
attention. What are the population increases
for which Michigan's higher education institu-
tions. must prepare? How should the Ann Arbor
campus, which has thus far maintained a rea-
sonably high quality of education, fit into the
general scheme of Michigan colleges - Michi-
gan State University, University branch
schools, the many smaller colleges and univer-
sities, the growing junior colleges?
But the effect of expanding enrollments will
doubtless occupy most of the committee's time.

Assuming the legislature resumes its former
willingness to provide the physical facilities for
expansion, what will be the effects on educa-
tional standards, intra-University communica-
tions and student psychology? Can the Univer-
sity maintain both the quality of its faculty
and its present student-faculty ratio? Would
admissions standards be lowered if the pro-
portion of applications accepted is no more
than kept at its present level? Can the cur-
rent degree of student-faculty communications
be maintained: would possible increased class-
room size seriously impair that communica-
tion, would teaching methods decline in person-
alization and penetration, would any out-of-
classroom contact be still possible?
OTHER problems of communications would
involve the faculty vis-a-vis the adminis-
tration (where already contact and under-
standing leaves much to be desired), commu-
nications within the student community be-
tween those with like aptitudes and interests,
and interchanges of ideas within the faculty
community, both between departments and
even within them.
And perhaps the most highly speculative
area of all, but perhaps also the most inter-
esting, might be the question of the psycholo-
gical situation of the individual student: is
he emotionally equipped to cope with a sea of
strange faces, in which he may well have no
niche, with even bigger housing units, class-
rooms, and campus boundaries. Can he feel
he is a part of a community so large, and if
not, is a further compartmentalization of that
community either possible or desirable?
The dangers of enrollment expansion may
be exaggerated. The University has doubled in
size every generation for many years, and if
this has proven disastrous its signs, are not
overly dramatic. But the effects of expansion
--that which we have experienced and that
which we presently face -- are probably more
subtle, and we will never waken some morn-
ing to some sudden evidence that education
continues to exist in name only, that the com-
munity of scholars we had known is no longer
a community.
THE NEW committee faces the unenviable
Job of detecting subtleties and gradual en-
croachments and then letting the students, the
faculty, and administration know when it is
time to apply the brakes, when we are cheap-
ening education faster than we are expanding
it, if in fact that point has not been reached
already.
-PETER ECKSTEIN

.. ."
e sv.-r pos n

7O- ;
~N)G { 9
loop"g

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 31 to June 11, 1957
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
Is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates'having a scheduled examination on June
10 and 11 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to he schedtuling committee.
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates
Reglr Mon. Mon. Tues. Tues.
ExagTie June 10 June 10 June 11 June 11
9-12 AM 2-5 PM 9-12 AM 2-5 PM
Special Mon. Tues. Thurs., Fri.
peial June 3 June 4 June 6 June 17
Period 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

£r.*

-y

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Johnson Guts USIA
By DREW PEARSON

TEXAS' Senator Lyndon John-
son, the astute and charming
Democratic leader, has a persua-
sive way of putting his nose al-
most against another senator's,
then telling him how much he
loves him and how important it is
to work together. Lyndon was
busier than a bird dog doing this
during the debate on cutting the
United States Information Agency
budget last week.
Two huddles were especially sig-
nificant. They were with Sen.
Jack Kennedy of Massachusetts,
who's been boomed as vice-presi-
dential running-mate with Lyn-
don in 1960; and Sen Joe Clark of
Pennsylvania, second Democratic
mayor to be elected in Philadel-
phia since the Civil War.
Previously, Clark and Kennedy
had challenged Johnson's steam-
roller tactics in cutting the United
States Information budget. John-
son presided over the appropria-
tions hearings on the United
States Information Agency,
printed some 1,200 pages of testi-
mony, then expected his col-
leagues to read it and vote intel-
ligently in less than 24 hours.
THE TRUTH is that the hear-
ings were not printed until Mon-
day night, were not delivered to
Capitol Hill until Tuesday, and
most senators did not see them
until Wednesday morning, the day
they were asked to vote.
"The fact that none of the sen-
ators have had time to read the
many pages of testimony - to
cut the heart out of an agency
which is vital to the country's in-

terests is almost irresponsible,"
complained Senator Case of New
Jersey, Republican.
Later, Johnson was seen huddl-
ing with Democrats Clark and
Kennedy. He told them, separate-
ly, this was a personal issue; that
as chairman of the subcommittee
which recommended cutting the
United States Information Agency
he must have their votes. He got
85.
Only one Democrat, Neuberger
of Oregon, stood up to vote
against the powerful, persuasive
Democratic leader of the Senate.
What Johnson did not tell his
colleagues was that he did not tell
the truth in presenting his de-
mand that the USIA budget be
gutted.
* * *
ON AT LEAST three important
points, Johnson deliberately mis-
led fellow senators. They were:
1. He charged that the USIA
was competing with American
press associations, when two let-
ters had been read in the hear-
ings, from the Associated Press
and the International News Serv-
ice, stating this was not the case.
2. He charged that USIA had
added 200 press employees, when
actually it employed 200 Filipino
and Lebanese printers and book-
binders to publish propaganda in
Manila and Beirut.
3. Johnson accused USIA of
spending $1,400 a week on a jazz
band TV program in Mexico City,
when actually three pilot shows
only had been staged in Mexico
City.
However, senators who had no

chance to read the hearings had
no way of knowing that Johnson
was not telling the truth.
What Johnson did tell them,
and told them eloquently, was
that USIA was headed by Arthur
Larson, the architect of "Modern
Republicanism." This, on Capitol
Hill, is a dirty word.
Larson not only wrote the Eis-
enhower bible on Modern Republi-
canism, but foolishly delivered a
speech on April 16 in Hawaii,
blasting the New Deal. A man who
needs to get appropriations from
a Democratic Congress doesn't
make such a speech.
* * *
RESULT: Johnson tore him to
pieces in committee hearings,
scarcely let him testify, put poli-
tics ahead of propaganda and the
importance it plays in the cold
war. Larson was a poor witness in
the first place, but when Johnson
finished, he was a dishrag.
Then Johnson cut almost 30 per
cent out of the USIA budget re-
quest and demanded that the
Senate vote on this before any
senator could possibly read the
hearings.
In contrast, Rep. John Rooney,
Bt coklyn Democrat, held 11 d,'ys
of careful heamnrgs, stuck to pro-
paganda problems, not politics,
pruned so judiciously that the
USIA can still function with his
recommended 105 million dollars.
With Johnson's cut - down to
89 million, some of the most im-
portant United States propaganda
in the cold war will be eliminated
just as Russia is stepping up its
cold-war budget.
(Copyright 1957 by Bell Syndicate Inc.)

MONDAY
TUESDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Time of Class
(at 8

SSaturday, June 1
Monday, June- 3
Tuesday, June 4
Friday, May 31
Thursday, June Q
Thursday, June 6
Friday, June 7 .
Saturday, June 8
Tuesday, June 4
Monday, June 3
Saturday, June 1
Wednesday, June 5
Friday, June 7
Saturday, June 8
Thursday, June 6

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5-
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5-
2-5

Time of Examination

'

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
Botany 2, 122 Friday, June 7
Bus. Ad. 11 Thursday, June 6
Bus. Ad. 12 Thursday, June 6
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 14 l Saturday, June 8
Chemistry 183 Saturday, June 8
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101,
153 Friday, May 31
Economics 71 Thursday, June 6
Economics 72 Thursday, June 6
English 1, 2 - Friday, May 31
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32,
61, 62 Monday, June 10
German 1, 2, 11, 32 Monday, June 10
Naval Science 102, 202, 302, 402 Wednesday, June 5
Political Science 2 Tuesday, June 11
Psychology 167, 173, 226, 256 Friday, May 31
Sociology 1, 4, 101 Wednesday, June 5
Sociology 60 'Saturday, June 8,
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31, 32 Tuesday, June 11

TUESDAY PANHEL
endorsed a set of
for the fall semestera
before the Panhellen
adoption.
In this they did n
out." The endorseme
-one that has no rul
be'no pre-rushing-
strength, and a basic
Panhellenic "sisters."
With this decision
lenge of following th
they are not conside
all women on campus
Assembly, want a set
maturity of the indi
AT THE MEETIN
pressed emphaticc
would not possiblya
looking at the code-
They claimed that y
conscience and that
'never been proved;
wouldn't it? Are some
has a hard time jud
been tried, let alone s
It is true that an
on the interpretatio
makes of it. Are thos
work saying they don
interpret it or do th
don't trust themselv
Any definite restri
dents place on sorori-
Edito
RICHARD S
RICHARD HALLORAN
Editorial Director
GAIL GOLDSTEIN .....
ERNEST THEODOSSIN
JANET REARICK . A
MARY ANN THOMAS
DAVID GREY.........
RICHARD CRAMER ..
STEPHEN HEILPERN.
JANE FOWLER and
ARLINE LEWIS.....
JOHN HIRTZEL .......
Busin
DAVID SILVER
MILTON GOLDSTEIN
WILLIAM PUSCH ...
0.T-TA flY tC WTlEVY ? l

Panhel's Honor Code*
LLENIC Executive Council on contact rules Monday will be admitting sor-
unrestricted contact rules ority women aren't grown-up enough to be
and yesterday placed them trusted with self-enforcement of a problem
iic board of delegates for ' that faces and affects them all equally.,
not choose the "easy way IF ALL HOUSES unite with a positive atti-
nt of an "all honor" code tude and pass an "all honor" code, they
les but only says there will would please the majority of affiliates and
- required courage and more important would not alienate indepen-
c belief and trust in their dents from the sorority system.
"f
, they took on the chal- A THOROUGH understanding and adherence
ieir "high ideals," showed to the rule by all women, affiliated and in-
ering only themselves but dependent, both old and new students, would
and that they, along with make the rules more powerful and effective
of rules that assumes the than others could possibly be.
vidual. Unrestricted rules would also strengthen
Panhel and make it more unified. If sororities
1G several delegates ex- can put a stop to their internal rivalries and
opinions that such a code instead support it wholeheartedly they will
work. These women were raise the somewhat wavering opinions many
-with a negative attitude. have had about their actions lately.
ou can'tJudge a person's anhel Executive Council also presented an
since honor codes- have idea that they thought would help all sorority
It wouldn't work. Why women realize the importance of the code. They
houses afraid to try? One suggested each sorority member sign a pledge
houssomething that has they would be on their honor not to pre-rush
omething that has not and to report any violations they saw.
"all honor" code depends LTHOUGH this is rather Juvenile, it would
on that each individual , wu
who feel that it wiil not bring the honor code down to the individual
n'e whorfee thairt"sillrs"tlevel and make each one realize their responsi-
n'y trusttheir"bstes"te bility to Panhellenic. Since an unrestricted
ey hesitate because they code depends so much on the individual, per-
? s haps house presidents should also strongly con-
iction which house pres- sider including such an honor pledge.
ty women when they vote It all boils down to this: sorority women talk
about their high ideals and faith and trust in
one another. Here's a chance to prove them.
pOogaap--ELIZABETH ERSKINE
New Books at the Library
orial Staff 7
SNYDER,. Editor Davis, H. L. - The Distant Music; NY, Wil-
LEE MARKS liam Morrow, 1957,
City Editor
........... Personnel Director Jean-Aubry, Gerard-The Sea Dreamer; NY,
. . Magazine Editor Doubleday, 1957.
. .te Edatr EDiretor Lohbeck, Don - Patrick J. Hurley; Chicago,
. ...... Sports Editor Regnery, 1957.
,.Associate Sports Editor Marquand, John P. - Stopover, Tokyo; Bos-
ton, Little Brown, 1957.
........ Women'd Co-Editors B tGS'
......... Chief Photographer Barrett, John G. - Sherman's March
Sft Through the Carolinas; Chapel Hill, Univ. of
ness Staff North Carolina Press, 1956.
Associate Business Manager Dos Passos, John - The Men Who Made the
. Advertising Manager Nation; NY, Doubleday, 1957.

2-5
2=5
2-5.
2-5
9-12
7-10 p.m
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
7-10 p.m.
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12

4

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:
Comment on lecture Series Plan

A. E. 130
C. E. 20
C. E. 21
C. E. 22
C. E. 151
Draw. 1, 22
Draw. 2, 33
Draw. 12
E. E. 5
E. M. 1
E. M. 2
*E. M. 1, 2
English 10, 11
I. E. 100, 110
I. E. 120
M. E. 2
M. E.32, 132
Naval Science
Physics 53
Physics 54

Saturday, June 8
Wednesday, uJne 5
Friday, May 31
Monday, June 10 s
Friday, May 31
Friday, May 31
Tuesday, June 11
Monday, June 10
Wednesday, June 5
Monday, -June 10
Wednesday, June 5
Tuesday, June 11
Wednesday, June 5
Saturday, June 8
Friday, May 31
Monday, June 10
Tuesday, June 11
Wednesday, June5
Tuesday, June 11
Friday, May 31

9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-a
9-12
9-12
7-10 p.m.
9-12
2-5

L rill

Lecture Ban . .
To the Editor:
THE LECTURE BAN instituted
at this school during the last
few years is a particular blot upon
the name of this university--a
university long known for its free-
dom and its intelligent examina-
tion and pursuit of new ideas.
Its basic premise would seem to
be that students of college age
should learn their political ideas
in the parroting boredom of the
blab school. If this is not the foun-
dation of it, then it can only be
that there is still a humiliating
fear of congressional investigation
into the academic life of any insti-
tution that shows any intelligent
interest in examining the seedy
economic theories of Karl Marx
and his fellow utopians.
Now Mr. Eckstein of The Daily
has come forward with some pro-
posalr in relation to this problem.
Mr. Eckstein has suggested that
SGC set up a lecture committee
which, it would seem, would per-
petrate another Lecture Series.
This committee would sponsor a
series of speakers of varying politi-
cal types from arch-conservative
to, perhaps, real radical.
With a balanced program such
as this, no stigma of radicalism
n~i r1nnra i-i aton, Cin ,-la crrsin

we would like to see, it is a step
in the right direction, and the
Young Democratic Club would like
to go on record as supporting Mr.
Eckstein's proposals. The Demo-
cratic party has always fought for
the fundamental freedom of indi-
viduals to improve their aware-
ness of the world about them-the
political, economic, and social
ideas current in their own time
that inextricably shape their own
lives.
It is unfortunate that in an age
which we should like to believe
enlightened, we find so many per-
sons that have forgotten that ig-
norance of the issues and the facts
is not the basis of democracy and
never can be; that intelligence
and free discussion are the guard-
ians oi freedom; and that without
them freedom will not someday
die, but is already dead.
Then let me assure Mr. Eckstein
that he can count on us for what-
ever support we can render him.
In this day it may be unsophisti-
cated toethink in such quaint,
inalterable terms as "tight" and
"wrong" (they smack of "sin" and
"goodness") but we feel deeply
that Mr. Eckstein is going in the
right direction.
The blacks and whites of con-
troversy may be gauche but they
are splendid colors. And so may

as S. David has now turned his
wrath on the Pakistani prime
minister for stating that the Mus-
lim world supported Pakistan on
Kashmir.
Our prizhe minister, answering
a question, said that our relations
with the Muslim world were most
cordial, as evident from their vig-
orous support to us on Kashmir.
Thus he did not appeal to the
Muslims to support us on grounds
of religion, as David claims. He
merely pointed out that the Mus-
lim world, like the rest of the
world, supports us on Kashmir.
In David's mind, there does not
seem to be any difference between
natural feeling of kinship between
peoples united by the same values
and ideals-the factor that brings
Pakistan close to the Muslim world
-and religious fanaticism, which
has no place in Pakistan.
The Kashmir case is 10 years
old. Witn the exception of Tndia's
friend, international communism,
the entire world has supported us
because we stand 'for the right of
the Kashmiri people to self-de-
termination.
If Mr. David has any preten-
sions to morality, he should direct
his advice toward his own prime
minister. It ill befits Mr. David to
lecture to our prime minister,
who iT rik nn iin nv f II

102, 202, 302, 402

I

*Conflict Exam. This period is to be used only by those having
a schedule conflict in E. M. 1 or 2 at the regular hour.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTION
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
X assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between April 26 and
May 13 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
QP.UnTf'. nT 'VI T A' A m T m., L

I
1~~

A,-

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