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May 23, 1957 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-23

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PAGZ SIX

THE MCHIGAN DAILY'

THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1957

A

PAE~LIT HE ICHIAN D~.a

SUMMER SESSION:
'U' Extension Service
Offers Varied Courses

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
_- -

The NEW WHRV
P resents.
19 - NEWSCASTS DAILY--19
PLUS
Three Weathercasts Direct from Willow Run
DON HERMAN, NEWS EDITOR

{ ,,.e.

University students will be able
to attend summer school sessions
in Grand Rapids, Detroit, Flint,
Saginaw, Alpena, Gaylord or Tra-
verse City this summer.
Undergraduates wisning to en-
roll in the extension courses should
consult their campus advisor prior
to registration. Graduate students
must prove they have peen ad-
mitted to the graduate school be-
fore they can register.
At Grand Rapids the six week
summer school session will begin
June 24. Registration will be from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on June 21 and
from 9 a.m. to noon on June 22.
Education Courses Offered
Nine courses, four in education,
are being scheduled for the Grand
Rapids school. Each carry two
credit hours. The fee is $11 per
credit hour.
Courses offered in education are
Elementary School Curriculum;
Modern High School Curriculum,
High School Supervision and
Supervision. of Elementary School
Instruction.
The other courses listed are In-
troduction to Art (Fine Arts 1),
Geography of North America
(Geography 110) and Geography
for Teachers (Geography,170).:
Two English courses are also
offered, Contemporary Poetry
(English 170) and The Novel Since
1850 (English 184).
Detroit Courses Listed
In the Detroit area the summer
school session will start June 24
at the Rackham Educational Me-
morial Building..
Six courses open to University
students are Co-operative Field
Experience in Business Education,
Co-operative Field Experience in
Industria. Education and Analysis
in Office Occupations, Research in
Education, Appraising Student
Progress aid Special Problems in
Vocational Education. In the Flit
and Saginaw area summer school
will be from June 17 to August 9
at the Flint College of the Uni-
versity.
Courses for Undergraduates
Courses will be offered in busi-
*ness administration, education,
English, history and psychogy.
For graduates there are curses
YR's Choose
New Officers
David Bray, '60, was elected
president of the Young Republi-
cans at their meeting Tuesday-.
He succeseds William Hanks,
Grad who resigned the post.
Hanks will work for the GOP state
central committee beginning in
July.
Richard Thompson, 59, was
elected vice-president at the meet-
ing. Other officers were Claudia
Teatsworth, '59, treasurer and
Gerald Lutz, '59, corresponding
secretary.
Chosen as members-at-large of
the executive board were Frances
Coulen, '59, Edward Bottum, '58-
BAd, andDonald Huttle, '59E.
Organization
I Noticesj
Christian Science Organization, regu -
lar testimony meeting, May 23, 7:30,
Upper Room, Lane Hall.
* * *'
Lutheran Student Association, Vesper
Service, May 23, 9:30 p.m., Lutheran
Student Chapel.
*. ".
Student National Education Associa-
tion, meeting, May 23, 7:30, UES Cafe-
teria. Speakers: Profs. Wallace, French,
and Rogers, "Special Education."
The Episcopal Student Foundation,
luncheon at Canterbury House follow-
ing the 12:10 celebration of Holy Co-
mnunin at the Church, May 24.

The Episcopal Student Foundation,
Canterbury picnic in the country, May
24. Cars will leave at 4:30 and 5:30. In
case of bad weather, picnic will be held
at Canterbury House.

in anthropology, education, his-
tory, library sciences; psyvhology
and sociology.
Extension courses will be held
.from June 17 to August 3 in Al-
pena at the Alpena High School. 1
Courses are Geography of North,
America and Geography for Teacti-
ers.
In Gaylord, the summer school
session will be held 'at the Gy-,
lord Rural Agricultural School.1
Juvenile Delinquency and The
Family are the two sociology cour-
ses offered.
Center in Traverse City
Northwestern Michigan College
is the site of the extension center
in Traverse City. Two educational
courses are Psychology and Teach-'
ing of Reading, Writing and Spell-
ing (Education C107) and Prac-
tlcum in Reading Improvement
(Education C132).
. Further information about sum-
mer school sessions may be ob-
tained from the Office of Summer'
Session, University Extension1
Service, 4524 Administr'ation Bldg.-
Assailant
Sentenced
A 24 year old former University'
students has been sentenced to a
60-day term in the county jail.
Charles W. Castrop,, of Dear-
born, begins serving his sentence
for felonious assault at 7 p.m.
Friday. In addition, he was placed
on probation for five years and
assessed $300 in fines and costs.
Castrop was arrested on Jan. 6,
after having beaten a' University
coed in her dormitory.
Graf Stresses
Earlier Stud
Of Languages
Foreign language study should
begiat the grade school level,
Prof. Gtto G. Graf of the German
department said recentay.
Prof. Graf said that children at
this age are very critical and kna-
lytical "They very often learn by
imitation anctL it is actually more
fun for them than work."
Because of America's position as
a world leader every cultared per-
son is obligated to acquaint him-
self with at least one foreign lan-
guage, Prof. Graf continued.
He added that this knowledge
will make dealings with foreigners
much more successful.
Prof. Graf heads a special sum-
mer session of the Institute in
Foreign Language Teaching in the
Elementary Schools.

(Continued from Page 4)
Doctoral and Professional Degree
Candidates WHO ATTEND THE COM-
MENCEMENT EXERCISES are entitled
to receive a Ph.D. or professional de-
gree hood. Those receiving a Ph.D. hood
during the ceremony may excange it
for the appropriate degree hood under
the East Stand immediately after the
ceremony, or at the office of the Di-
ploma Clerk, Administration wuilding.
Distribution of Diplomas: If the ex-
ercises are held in the Stadium, dl-
plomas for ail graduates, excepting
the School of Dentistry, will be dis-
tributed from designated stations un-
der the east stands of the Stadium, m-
mediately after the exercises. The di-
ploma distribution stations are on the
level above the tunnel entrance.
If, however, the exercises are held
in the Yost Field House, all diplomas
excepting those of the School of Den-
tistry will be distributed from the win-
dows of the Cashier's Office and the
Office-of Registration and Records in
the lobby of the Administration Build-
ing. Following the ceremony diplomas
may be called for until 9:00 p.m.
Lectures
Hopwood Lecture: Malcolm Cowley
ill speak on "The Beginning Writer
in the University" at 4:15 p.m. Thurs.,
May 23, in Rackham Lecture Hall. Pre-'
sentation of the Hopwood Awards will
follow the lecture.
Astronomy Department Visitors' Nite:
Fri., May 24, 8 p.m., Rm., 2003, Angell
Hall. Prof. Dean B. McLaughlin will
speak on "Surface of Mars". After the
lecture the Student Observatory on the
fifth floor of Angell Hall will be open
for inspection and for telescopic ob-
servations of Jupiter (and Saturn).
Children welcomed, but must be ac-
companied by adults.
Concerts
Carillon Recital, 7:15 this evening,
May 23, by Percival Price, University
Carillonneur: Modern Carillon Music in
Europe, including French, English,
German and Danish compositions. This
is the fifth in a series of eight spring
recitals by Professor Price.
Student Recital, Wendell Orr, bass-
baritone, in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the degree of Master
of Music, this evening, May 23, at 3:30
p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall. Nelita
True, pianist, will accompany him.
Works by Handel, Mozart, Brahms, Ra-
vel, Rachmaninoff, and Mussorgsky. He
is a pupil of Chase Baromeo. Open to
the public.
..Student Recital: Mary Mattfeld, con-
tralto, ini partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the Master of Music

degree at 8:30 p.m. Fri., May 24, in Aud.
A, Angell Hall. Miss Mattfeld is a pu-
pil of Chase Baremeo, and will be as-
sisted by Joyce Noh, pianist, Jean Har-
ter, violist, and a chamber orchestra
conducted by Carl Karapetian. Open
to the general public.
Academic Notices
School of Business Administration:
Faculty meeting Fri., May 24, at 3:15
p.m., uin Room 146.
Applied Mathematics Seminar, Thurs.,
May 23, at 4 p.m. in 246, West Engi-
neering. Ralph Dennis will speak on
"NumericalaSolution of Heat Conduc-
tion Equations". Refreshments in Room
274, West Eng., at 3:30 p.m.
Interdepartmental Seminar on Ap-'
plied Meteorology: Engineering. Thurs.,
May 23, 4 p.m., 307 West Engineering
Bldg. William Benner will speak on
"The Effects of Wind Gusts on Motor
Vehicles" - Chairman: Prof. Walter E.
Lay.
402 Interdisciplinary Seminar on Ap-
plication of Mathematics to Social Sci-
ence, Room 3401 Mason Hall, Thurs.,
May 16, 3:15-4:45 p.m., May 23. A. Rapo-
port, "Biased Net Models for Socio-
grams."
,Psychology Colloquium:."Recent Experi-
ments in Emotional Conditioning," Dr.
Howard Hunt, University of Chicago,
4:15 p.m. Fri., May 24, Aud. B, Angell
Hall.
Doctoral Examination for John Buet-
tner-Janusch, Anthropology; thesis:
"The A-B-O Blood Groups and Natur-
al Selection: A Review", Sat., May 25,
301 Special Projects Building, at 9:30
a.m. Chairman, F. P. Thieme.
Doctoral Examination for Homer
Chasseil Cooper, Social Psychology; the-
sis: "Interaction of Socioeconomic
Charcteristics and Reference Groups
with Respect to Voting Behavior",
Thurs. May 23, 254 Institute forSo-
cial Research, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
Angus Campbell.
Doctoral Examination for Arthur Ed-
ward Hallerberg, Mathematics; thesis:
"The Development of the Geometry of
the Fixed-Compass with Especial At-
tention to the Contributions of George
Mohr," Thurs., May 23, 2451 MasoneHall,
at 4:00 p.m. Chairman, P. S. Jones.
Doctoral Examination for Eleanor
Jean Maliche, Education; thesis: "An
Investigation into the Validity of the
CPS Personal Adjustment and Human
Relations Test", Thurs., May 23, 3000
University High School, at .10:30 a.m.
Chairman, J. M. Trytten.
Doctoral Examination for William
Charles Reher, Economics; thesis: "A
Cross-Section Analysis of Contractual
Saving", Thurs., May 23, 105 Econom-

ics Building, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
J. N. Morgan.
Doctoral Examination for William
Lloyd Sippell, Forestry; thesis: "A
Study of the Forest Tent Caterpillar,
Malacosoma disstria Hbn., and Its
Parasite Complex in Ontario", Thurs.,
May 23, 4046 Natural Science Bldg., at
8:30 a.m. Chairman, S. A. Graham.
Doctoral Examination for John Pat-
rick White, History; thesis: "Progres-
sivism and the Judiciary: A Study of
the Movement for Judicial Reform,
1901-1917," Thurs., May 23, 3609 Haven
Hall, at 2:00 p.m. Chairman, Sidney
Fine.
Doctoral Examination for Donald
Glenn Gardner, Chemistry; thesis: "Nu-
clear Decay Scheme Analysis and Char-
acterization Studies of (d, alpha) Re-
action Products", Fri., May 24, 3003
Chemistry Bldg., at 2:00 p.m. Chair-
man, W. W. Meinke.
Doctoral Examination for Sidney
Goda, Education; thesis: "A Study of
the Language Skills of Profoundly Deaf
Adolescent Children at a Residential
School for the Deaf", Friday, May 24,
1600 University Elementary School, at
3:30 p.m. Chairman, W. A. Ketcham.
Doctoral Examinataion for Clara Jean
Leith, Romance Languages and Liter-
atures: Spanish; thesis: "Baldomero
Fernandez Moreno: His Life and
Works", Fri., May 24, East Council
Room, Rackham Bldg., at 4:00 p.m.

Chairman, E. Anderson-Imbert.
Doctoral Examination for Arthur
John Myers, Geology; thesis: "Geology
of Harper County, Oklahma", Fri., May
24, 4065 Natural -Science Bldg., at 2:00
p.m. Chairman, J. H. Zumberge.
Doctoral Examination for Mung-Chio
Chao Sun, Economics; thesis: "Japan-
ese Raw Silk and American Raw Cot-
ton", Fri., May 24, 105 Economics Build-
ing, *t 3:00 p.m. Chairman, C. F. Rem-
er.
Doctoral Examination for Robert Wil-
liam Terhune, Physics; thesis: "Elec-
tric Field Induced Vibration Rotation
Spectra of H-2 and D-2", Fri., May
24, 2038 Randall Laboratory, at 2:00 p.m.
Chairman, C. W. Peters.
Placement Notices
Personnel Requests:
Union Carbide and' Carbon Corp., New
York, N.Y., has openings for men in
Accounting, Advertising, Chemical or
Mech. E., Chemistry, and Mathematics
for positions in Acctg., Advertising,
Management, Purchasing and Foreign
Sales.
Pesco Products Div., Borg-Warner
Corp., Bedford, Ohio, needs men in
Mech., Aero., Elect. E. and Tool Design.
National Aluminate Corp., Chicago,
Ill., has Sales and Staff openings for
Chemists, Chem. Engrs., and Botanists.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.,
Ext. 3371.

1600

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WELL: Lift your head up high an' show the world
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There are only 50 Ensians and 30 Records left.
Purchase yours at the Student Publications Bldg.
between 9 A.M. and 5 P.M. Daily

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