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May 23, 1957 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-23

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THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1957

THE MCHIGAN DA11LY

O A P4-lp "Vellp

THE MTCHTGAN BITTN

PAGE F1IVE

VIOLET HANLEY:
Champion Teaches Women's Golf

U' Coeds Complete Season
With Spring Sport Playoffs

By BERT SOFFIN
"If there is one thing that I am
proud of, it's that girls have re-
membered golf as fun, as a game,"
emphasizes Mrs. Violet Hanley,
internationally known golfer and
instructor in the women's physi-
cal education department.
"When I came to the University
I wanted to find championship
material, and now I've ended up
by giving satisfaction to so many
people," she remarks, summing up
her 25 year teaching career.
Hale and hearty, she believes
that "age is a matter of activity
and interest."
State Champion
Mrs. Hanley retired from a 15
year participation in major com-
petition after winning her fourth
state women's golf championship
tournament in 1934.
With a smile of recollection she
says that she discovered golf at
the age of ten. From then her
golf was nourished with much
practice and the understanding
and encouragement of her hus-
gand, Stewart Hanley.
Between 1921 and 1934 she
qualified for ten United States'
national tournaments. In 1930 she
was chosen to manage and play on
the American team against a se-
lect group of British golfers.
Team Member
As a member of this team of
best amateur women golfers in
America, she performed in Scot-
land and France, as well as Eng-
land.
Easily recognized by her famil-
iar blue beret, her students can
spot her instantly on Palmer
Field.
Coeds in her classes have pro-
fited from her extensive know-
ledge and skill of the sport. As
one student says, "She really
knows her golf and transmits her
enthusiasm for the game to you.
Joins Staff
At the request of Dr. Margaret
Bell, supervisor of the women's
physical education department,
she came to the University in 1929
to organize women's golf. The 461
coeds receiving golf instruction to-
day are a "big jump from the 200
coeds of earlier years, a definite
sign .of increased interest in the
sport," she says.
"I'm not strictly a physical edu-
ADC Forms
Secretariat
Committee Increases
Facilities of Assembly
Plans for a new permanent
committee of the Assembly Dormi-
tory Council were revealed Mon-
day at Assembly's last meeting.
A secretariat committee will be
initiated next fall, according to
Betsy Alexander, '58, Assembly
president.
The secretariat will have a two-
fold purpose, "first, to integrate
freshmen and transfer students
into Assembly activities and sec-
ondly to assist Assembly in it's
organization,' Miss Alexander
said.
Bobbi Banks, "58, chairman of
the planning committee an-
nounced that the secretariat will
be broken down into three sec-
tions: research, publicity and of-
fice staff.
Preceding the announcement of
these plans, Christine Wells, '59,
was introduced as the new Assem-
bly secretary. She was selected by
the executive council upon the
resignation of Monteen Johnson,
'59.
It was also decided by a vote of
the ADC members to postpone ap-
propriating scholarship funds for
girls on campus until sufficient
funds had been laid aside to as-

sure the education of the Hungar-
ian student whom Assembly is
supporting.

cation instructor, she explains.
She received her B.A. and M.A.
degrees in anthropology.
Following her interest in this
field, she is an expert in ancient
Far Eastern ceramics.
Visits Stockholm
In Stockholm in 1955, giving
golf clinics she discovered that
the Crown Prince of Sweden is
also an avid admirer of the ,art.
During her stay there she parti-
cularly enjoyed the ceramic ex-
hibit which he had arranged.
The Stockholm golf clinics were
a most interesting experience for
her. When they asked her to give
them she said, "I really didn't
t1ave the time but they were very
persistent."
Of her teaching at the Univer-
sity, Mrs. Hanley says, "It has
been lots of fun."
But she does not plan to con-
tinue teaching after the summer
school physical education pro-
gram. Although her plans of the
future are indefinite, golf and
ceramics are certain to remain
her hobbies.

The Women's Athletics Associa-
tion has completed its spring
sports season. The annual play-
offs have given the W.A.A. new
champions for the coming year.
Golf ... *
The Golf Club, a Women's Ath-
letic Association organization, is
sponsoring an invitational golf
tournament from 9 to 12 Saturday
morning.
Invited to the meet are the wo-
men's teams of Wayne State and
Michigan State Universities. Each
school is represented by three class
A players and three class B play-

Tennis* .
Kay Weaver, '59, won the all
campus women's tennis tourna-
ment for the second year in a row
Monday.
Miss Weaver defeated Jane
Grathwohl, '57, by the match
scores of 1-6, 13-11 and 7-5.
Softball **.,
Helen Newberry defeated Stock-
well Hall to win the women's soft-
ball tournament by the score of
fifteen to one last week.
In the semi-finals, Newberry
beat Alpha Omicron Pi, and
Stockwell won against Tyler
House. Thirty-four houses entered
the tournament.

Union To Present
Blue Book Dance
Blue books will surround couples
at the annual Bluebook Blues
Dance Saturday from 9 p.m. to
midnight in the Union Ballroom.
Gershom Morningstar, student
folk singer and Gulantics finalist,
will entertain. He has sung at the
Union Hospital Show for the past
two years.
The Union sponsored annual
dance is designed to help students
forget their exams for the evening.
Dance music will be provided by
Jim Servis and his orchestra.
Tickets may be purchased at the
door.

*1

y A. Michelsen
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Shipping and insuranceil.
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Minimum order, $50.
H. NEILS DANISH SILVER
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VIOLET HANLEY
... skilled golfer

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PHI CHI THETA - Phi Chi
Theta, professional fraternity for
women in Business Administra-
tion, will install Shirley Dalby,
president; Roberta Doering, vice-
President; Joyce Hill, treasurer;
and Ruth Wagner, secretary to-
day.
DELTA PHI ALPHA - Twenty-
two members will be initiated into
the new campus Delta Rho chap-
ter of Delta Phi Alpha, national
German. honorary fraternity, to-
morrow.
Prof. Max Dufner of the Ger-
man department, says the pur-
pose of the honorary is "to recog-
nize and encourage excellent
scholarship in German language
and literature.

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