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May 09, 1957 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-09

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THIMSDAY, MAY 9, 1957

-"...

DIDN'T LIKE MAKING MOVIES:
Met's Rise Stevens Reminisces About Opera Career

"Miss Stevens, may I have your
autograph, please?"
Rise Stevens, world-famous as
a mezzo-soprano, soprano and
contralto, smiled graciously at the
small, eleven-year-old boy who
spoke, and signed the program he
held out.
This scene was in a backstage
room of Hill Auditorium last
Sunday night, just after Miss Ste-
vens had completed her solo num-
bers in the final May Festival
concert.
'First Lady of Opera'
Dressed in a cream and gray
Christian Dior original gown, the
"First Lady of Opera" reminisced
about the days before she "broke"
into the opera.
Miss Stevens started her ca-
reer at the age of 10, when she
appeared on a children's radio
program.
In her teens, she sang with the
Opera Comique at Heckscher
Theatre in New York. While
there, Mme. Schoen-Rene, head of
Juilliard School of Music, offered
her a scholarship.
Studied at Juilliard
"Mme. Schoen-Rene was a
great influence in my life," Miss
Stevens said. "She was my first

fers from the opera system in
United States," Miss Stevens ex-
plained.
"Each singer has a home op-
era," she continued. "Mine was
at Prague. A singer sings at the
home opera and then he or she
is a guest at another city, for in-
stance Paris or Vienna. However,
he always comes back to the opera
called home."
"Many times operas are sung
in two different languages, the
visiting star singing in the ori-
ginal tongue while the rest of the

cast uses their native language,"
she added.
In One Language
"They also have a split season.
The operative season is subdivided
into periods of five or six weeks.
During each period operas are
performed in a single language.
They'll have a German season, an
Italian season, a French season
and so on," She explained. "This
system is also very common in
South America."
Although she is kept busy in
her opera career, Miss Stevens
has made three movies - "Choco-

'CONFLICT RESOLUTION':
New, Journal To -Study
International Relations

RISE STEVENS
. . . opera star
teacher, as I had received no pro-
fessional training beforehand."
"I studied at Juilliard for two
years," Miss Stevens remarked.
"Then Mme. Schoen-Rene sent
me to study abroad, in Berlin,
Paris ..:.'
A year later Miss Stevens re-
turned to Juilliard where she re-
ceived her diploma.
After placing in the finals of
the Metropolitan Opera Auditions
of the Air, Miss Stevens was of-
fered a contract, but refused it.
Not Ready for Met
"We, Mme. Schoen-Rene and
myself, decided that I should gain
more experience before entering
the Met.," she ?xplained. "So I
went, abroad to study and gain
experience."
While in Paris she met George
Szell, now conductor of the
Cleveland Symphony, who told
her about an opening for a mez-
zo-soprano at the Prague Opera
House.
She auditioned and got the po-
sition, remaining there until 1939,
when she received a Metropolitan
Opera contract.
"Opera system in Europe dif-
IHC Petitions
Deadline Near
The deadline for Inter-House
Council petitions is tomorrow, ac-
cording to President Drake Duane
'58.
Students may petition for com-
mittee chairmanships, judiciary
memberships and Big Ten Resi-
dence Hall Secretary. Petitions
may be obtained from house pres-
idents or IHC offices in the Stu-
dent Activities Building.
e
0
p 0
00
to say you care
)jotkeror ]

By MARGARET MOORE
Can the methods of social
science be applied to international
conflicts; is war part of a larger
general theory of social conflict?
A new international quarterly
journal for research related to war
and peace is attempting to stimu-
late a new approach to this area
of international relations.
The first issue, date-lined March
1957, of "Conflict Resolution"
came off the presses yesterday.
Riesman Among Sponsors
This Journal, published by the
University journalism department,
is sponsored by a committee of
world-wide membership including
such well-known scholars as David
Riesman, Gardner Murphy, Julian
Huxley, Elmo Roper, Paul F. La-
zarfeld and Clyde Kluckholm. Ja-
pan, France, India, England, Indo-
nesia, as well as the United States
are represented on the committee.
In the opening editorial, eco-
nomics professor Kenneth Bould-
ing issues this challenge:
"By far the most important
practical problem facing the hu-
man race today is that of inter-
national relations -more specifi-
cally, the prevention of global war.
Interdisciplinary Study
If intellectual progress is to be
made in this area, the study of
international relations must be
made an interdisciplinary enter-
prise, drawing its discourse from
all the social sciences and even
further.
"Conflict is a phenomenon
which is studied in many different
fields. It occurs in many different
situations. Many of the patterns
and processes which characterize
conflict in one area also char-
acterize it in others.
"It is not too much to claim that
out of the contributions of many
fields a general theory of conflict
is emerging. The isolation of these
various fields, however, has pre-
vented the building of these con-
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tributions i n t o an integrated
whole."
Position of Military
Morris Janowitz, sociology pro-
fessor, discusses the position of
a professional military organiza-
tion in a highly technological
society.
He concludes, "The current drift
toward the destruction of the dif-
ferentiation of the military from
the civilian cannot produce gen-
uine similarity but runs the risk of
creating new forms of hostility
and unanticipated militarism."
Initial development of the jour-
nal was made possible by a grant
from the Rackham Fund of $4800
to Prof. Boulding in December,
1955.
' Boulding had become interested
in the idea the preceding summer
when the Center for Advanced
Study of Behavioral Sciences in
Stanford, Calif., evaluated the
failure of "Bulletin of the' Re-
search Exchange on the Preven-
ion of War."
With the Rackham grant, he
organizde an editorial board and
submitted an outline of the project
to various foundations. Hopkins
Foundation subsequently granted
funds for the first year of publica-
tion.

late Soldier," "Going My Way,"
with Bing Crosby, and "Carnegie
Hall."
"I didn't like making the movies
very much," Miss Stevens said.
No Continuity
"There' is no continuity - they
make the last part of the movie
first and pre-record and dub in
the sound, so that you don't get a
chance to see the complete pic-
ture until it's released."
Married for 18 years to Walter
Surovy, her agent and manager,
they are the parents of a 13 year
old boy, Nicholas Vincent.
Her future plans include several
concerts with the Metropolitan
Opera Co., which is now on tour.
She will join the group in Chi-
cago, Toronto, and Houston,
Texas.
To Be On Television
In two weeks, Miss Stevens will
be a guest performer on the Ed
Sullivan Show. She will also ap-
pear on the Firestone Hour June
3.
June 10, Miss Stevens, her hus-
band and son, will travel to
Europe for a month to five weeks.
There she will join Gluck Orfeo,
Roberta Peters, and Lisa Della-
casa in Rome to make a record-
ing.
In her many tours Miss Ste-
vens is becoming a spearhead of
what is slowly developing into
one of America's most important
exports - the American opera
singer.
.Ewert To Talk
On Literature
A professor of medieval French
literature at Oxford will discuss
"The Judas Iscariot Legend in
Medieval Literature" at 8 p.m. to-
day in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Prof. Alfred Ewert, a reviewer
of scholarly works in the medie-
val period, has also edited a series
of French texts for school use.
Prof. Ewert's talk today will be
sponsored by the Romance lan-
guages department and open to
the public. He is currently on a
speaking tour through the United
States and Canada.

Scholarship
Competitions
Now Open
Scholarships for graduate study
abroad in 1958-59 are now avail-
able through Fulbright and Buenos
Aires Convention competitions.
Fulbright awards cover tuition,
books and maintenance for one
academic year, and allow for study
and research in Europe, Latin
America and Asia.
Transportation is provided by
the U.S. government and mainten-
ance by the government of the
host country in the Buenos Aires
Convention scholarships.
United States citizenship, a col-
lege degree or its equivalent by the
time the award will be used and
a knowledge of the language of
the country of application are
eligibility requirements for these
fellowships.
Competition for the awards
closes November 1, 1957.
Women's Clubs
Chief Speaks
People of today like to substi-
tute a "smattering of ignorance"
about many topics for real know-
ledge on any one subject, R. I. C.
Prout said recently.
Mrs. Prout, president of the
General Federation of Women's
Clubs, criticized the way Ameri-
cans tend to condense their read-
ing material and ideas into "cap-
sule" dimensions.
"In doing this," she said, "we
may lose our intensity of feeling
for intellectual activity."
To prevent this, Mrs. Prout said
that "young people now in school
should be taught how to learn."
Thus a basic desire to learn will be
gained and w ill continue all
through life, she added.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

May 10: Collegiate Sorosis, Delta The-
ta Phi, Kappa Sigma, Phi Delta Phi.
May 11 (1:00 closing) ; Alpha Chi Sig-
ma, Alpha Kappa Kappa, Alpha Rho
Chi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Chi Phi, Delta
Chi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Theta Phi,
East Quadrangle, Kelsey Reeves, Nu
Sigma Nu, Phi Alpha Kappa. Phi Chi,
Phi Delta Phi, Phi Rho Sigma, Phi
Sigma Delta, Phi, Sigma Kappa, Psi
Upsilon, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Triangle,
Theta Delta Chai.
May 12: Adelia Cheever, American
Soc. for Public Administration, Delta
Theta Phi, Phi Delta Phi, Victor
Vaughan.
Lectures
Kasimir Fajans -- Award Lecture.
4:00 p.m., Room 1400, Chemistry Build-
Seventh Social Seminar of the Michi-
ing. Prof. Seymour Z. Lewin of New
York University will discuss "Refrac-
tometry in the Service of Chemistry."
gan Chapter of the American Society
for Public Administration May 9 at 8:00
p.m. in the west Conference Room,
Rackham Building. Jane weidlund, as-
sistant program director, Europe, Afri-
ca and the Middle East, United Nations,
New York, will speak on "Problems in
International Administration."
Concerts
The University of Michigan Wolver-
ine Band will hold its annual spring
concert on Thurs., May 9 at 8:00 p.m.
in the Union Ballroom. Open to the
general public. No admission charge.
The University of Michigan Men's
Glee Club will present its 98th Annual
Spring Concert in Hill Auditorium at
8:30 p.m. on Sat., May 11. All tickets
will be valid until 8:30 p.m. after which
standing patrons will be seated.
A cademic Notices
Medical College Admission Test: Can-
didates taking the Medical College Ad-
mission Test on May 11 are 'requested
to report to Room 130, Business Admin-
istration Building at 8:45 a.m. Sat-
urday.
Interdepartmental Seminar on Ap-
plied Meteorology: Engineering. Thurs.,
May 9, 4 p.m., 307 West Engineering
Bldg. Fred V. Brock will speak on "Ice
as a Load Bearing and Force Exerting

(Continued from Page 4)

Matefial"-- Chairman: Prof. James
T. Wilson,
Applied Mathematics Seminar Thurs.,
May 9, at.4:00 p.m., in Room 246, West
Engineering. Prof. Paul Naghdi will
speak on the "Elastic-Plastic wedge."
Refreshments in Room 274, Westo En-
gineering at 8:30 p.m.
402 Interdisciplinary Seminar on the
Application of Mathematics to Social
Scienee, Room 3401, Mason Hall, Thurs.,
3:15-4:45 p.m., May 9. Robert Hefner,
"A Contribution to Multidimensional
Psychophysics."
Physical-Analytical-Inorganie Semin-
ar. Thurs., May 9, 7:30 p.m., Room 3005
Chemistry Building. M. Russell will
speak on "The Reaction of Methyl
Radicals with Hydrocarbons." E. Rothe
will speak on "Atomic Clocks".,
Organic Seminar. Thurs., May 9 at
7:30 p.m., Room 1300, Chemistry Build-
ing. H. Smith will speak on "Cyclo-
heptatriene", H. Hall will speak on "4-
oxy-3-aryi-l-thia (SIX)-2, 3-diamolines."
Doctoral Examination for Alton La-
mon Raygor, Education; thesis: "Per-
sonality hanges Concomitant with Col-
lege Reading Improvement", Fri., May
10, 2532 University Elementary School,
at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, D. E. P. Smith,
Placement Notices
Sophomores in Electrical Engineering
wanting to enter a Cooperative Pro-

gram with Chrysler Corporation on
guided missile work at Redstone Ar-
senal, please contact Prof. John J.
Carey. Room 2519. East Engineering
Building, Immediately. The first as-
signment at Redstone Arsenal will be
this summer.
Beginning with Tues., May 14, the
following schools will be at the Bureau
of Appointments to iterview for
teachers for the 1957-58 school year.
Tues., May 14
St. Clair, Michigan-All Elementary;
Elementary Physical Education; Eng-
lish / Speech; English / Publications;
Girls Physical Education.
Lansing, Michigan - All Elementary;
High School Girls Physical Education;
Art; Band.
Wed., May 15
Clinton, Michigan - Girls Physical
Education; Mathematics; Business Edu-
cation (shorthand).
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Administration Build-
ing, NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
'Personnel Requests:
Solar Aircraft Co., San Diego, Calif.,
has several openings in the Engineering
Division for engineering graduates.
Sheffield Chemical, Div. of Sheffield
Farms Co., Inc., Norwich,, N.Y., needs
two men with some technical (chemi-
cal) training and with some sales ex-
perience to sell in the Midwest.
Pepsodent, Div. of Lever Brothers a.,
Chicago, Ill., is looking for Mech. 3.
for positions as Junior Trainees. Al-
though the initial training takes place
in Chicago, there are plants through-
out the U.S. to which trainees might
be sent later.
American Bituminus and Asphalt Ceo.,
Cincinnati, Ohio, needs Chemical and
Civil Engre. for Asphalt Bales.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg. ext. 3371.

STUDENT NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOC.
Presents
Dr. MeClusky
School of Education, Professor of Educational
Psychology and Mental Measurements
& Statistics and Consultant in
Community Adult Education
To Speak on
ADULT EDUCATION
TONIGHT at 7:30
University Elementary School Cafeteria

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