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May 09, 1957 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THMSDAY, MAY 9, 1957

THE MICHIGAN :DAILY

1tAf':V 11!{!' !'ll t

THURSDAY, MAY 8, 195'7 THE MICHIGANT DAILY w * ~w wmu~mei,

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M Niine 0
Wolverines To Meet
Boilermakers, Illini Next.

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To day

Big Ten Baseball
STANDINGS

i

Michigan
Minnesota
Iowa
Ohio State
Michigan State
Wisconsin
Northwestern
Illinois
Purdue
Indiana

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#roeIe...
ERNIE MYERS

By DALE CANTOR
Michigan's league-leading base-
ball team takes a break from Con-
ference action this afternoon as it
takes on the Notre Dame nine in a'
return engagement at South Bend.
Ind.
The Wolverines will collide with
Purdue tomorrow afternoon in a
single game at Lafayette and then
z
4".
t t f
and Blue lead the Big Ten with
a 5-1 won-lost mark. Their only
defeat came at the hands of Con-
ference foe Wisconsin. However,
M~ichigan bounced back and pro-
ceeded to down Northwestern in
two games, 10-3 and 12-5.
Snider Still Out
Wolverine catcher Gene Snider
is still side-lined with a sore arm,
but Coach Ray Fisher hopes to
Use the brawny backstop in one
of the Conference games, if pos-
sible. In the meantime, Jim Dickey
will continue handling the catch-
ing chores.
Fisher will probably send a par-
ade of pitchers to the mound dur-
-ng the four-game trip. Bob Sealby
is scheduled to start against the
Irish with either Bruce Fox or
John Herrnstein gaining the nod
against Purdue.
Girardin and Clark
Glenn Girardin and Jim Clark
will probably face the Illini in
Saturday's doubleheader with Don
Poloskey and Dean Finkheiner
in reserve.

In their last encounter with the
Irish, Michigan took both ends of
the doubleheader, 5-4 and 3-0.
Purdue and Illinois are present-'
ly sharing the 7th slot in the Big
Ten standing wtih 1-2 won-lost
records. Both schools have team
batting average of .252. Illinois
and Michigan both have team'
fielding averages of .946 for fourth
place honors. However, Purdue ap-
pears tobe arbit weaker in the
fielding department with .93 1.
Purdue will probably send its
ace righthander, Don Tuenis,
against the Wolverines.
Teunis recently lost a two-hit-
ter that he pitched against Minne-
sota, 1-0. The only hits that he
gave up were clustered in the same
inning to produce the lone tally.
The Illini lineup is sparked by
sophomore shortstop Bob Klaus,
who is a brother of Boston Red
Sox veteran Billy -Klaus. Klaus is
Illinois' leading hitter with a sweet
.583. He is also the key to the
Illini's improved defensive infield.
His presence has allowed senior
Rolla McMullen to move to third
base, wherey he has been impres-
sive.

William C. Lucier, a Michigan
graduate, was appointed assist-
ant football and hockey coach
at Michigan Tech. Lucier,
whose appointment will become
effective September 1, 1957, re-
ceived an A.B. degree in history
in 1955 and a M.S. degree in
Physical Education in 1956 from
Michigan. Lucier won four let-
ters at Michigan and was goal-
tender on three NCAA hockey
championship squads. He play-
ed freshman football here but
gave up the sport to concen-
trate on hockey. In only one
year of coaching Lucier led his
football teams to the Western
Ontario Secondary School Title
with a 10-0 record.

Six Squads To Contend
For Big Ten Golf Title

By FRED KATZ
In the words of Steve Boros,
Ernie Myers is a person who would
not stand out in a crowd.
However, that statement is in
dire need of qualification, for when
it comes to a crowd of third base-
men, Mr. Myers with his rifle-arm-
ed peg to first distinguishes him-
self quite wvell.
In conversing with the sandy-
haired junior, who is playing his
first season of Michigan varsity
baseball, his shyness and modesty
becomes definitely apparent.
Flint Neighbors
Both Boros and Jim Vukovich
are in positions to comment on
this, for all three live in the same
neighborhood in Flint, played to-
gether on Flint Northern's base-
ball team, and were the co-stars
of the Flint American Legion team
that took the state championship
a few years ago.
Myers says that it has been a
long-time dream of the three of
them to sometime play together on
Michigan's squad, and their hopes
have finally been realized this
year.
To Myers, baseball is something
more than just an extra-curricu-
lar activity, for his primary ambi-
tion upon graduation is to be of-1
fered a professional contract. Er-
Ex-Manager
Move-,s Up?0
WASHINGTON (A) - Charlie
Dressen headed back to town yes-
terday saying he'd "rip the club
apart" if he accepted a front office
job with the Washington Senators.
Dressen was manager of the
Senators until Tuesday, when
President Calvin Griffith fired him.
Griffith, saying "drastic" action
was necessary after only 4 victor-
ies in 20 games, put the team in
charge of Cookie Lavagetto, until
then Dressen's top coach.
New Job
While getting the heave-ho in
his third season, Dressen was of-'
fered the yr guely defined upstairs
post of "coordinator of player
personnel."
Dressen insisted on time to think
it over. He said he'd want at least
a three-year contract, assurances
of money to rebuild the last-place
team and authority to spend it.
Griffith wasn't prepared to meet
these demands on the spot. It
was uncertain whether the two
could get together.

nie is in the school of education,
majoring in math, and after his
playing days are over he hopes to
coach high school ball and teach
his specialty at the same time.
Dedicated to Baseball
Like most men dedicated to the
national pastime, the 21-yr.-old
Myerspracticed his sport before
he even came of school age and
has never been away from it since.
Ernie showed a great deal of
pride and admiration in mention-
ing Bert Smith, whom he calls

MI
Min
Pu
Nor
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Oh

Big Ten Averages
G AB Ha
CHIGAN 6 220 72.
nnesota 5 160 46
tnols 3 107 27 .
rdue 3 107 27
rthwestern 3 92 23,
va 4 127 31,
sconsin 6 196 47.
chigan State 6 182 43
i tana 6 193 444
lo State 6 166 33 .

Pct.
833
100
730
667
33
33
33
I333
I333
67
.327
.288
.252
.252
.250
.244
.240
.236
.228

Oh"9 nrn ate nwt ie

What a man uses on his face
is important

CHOOSE QUALITY
SHAVE WITH

Figures Prove It
The Big Ten and individual
averages released yesterday give
concrete proof why Michigan
leads the conference.
The Wolverines lead the
league in hitting with .327 on
the strength of 72 hits in 220
at bats. Included are ten doub-
les, three triples, and 12 home
runs, all good enough to lead
the league in these depart-
ments.
Captain Ken Tippery is lead-
ing the conference regulars with
.500. Tippery, John Hernstein,
and George Thomas of Minne-
sota lead in home runs with
three. Tippery leads in hits
with 12 and Steve Boros leads
in runs batted in with nine.

0. .

Rich, creamy quality for
shaving comfort and skin
health. New formula Old
Spice Shaving Creams in
giant tubes:
Brushless .60 Lother .65.
Old Spice aerosol
Smooth Shave 1.00
SHUL.TON
MW YO U. TORONTO

Army Inducts
Hundley
CHARLESTON, W. Va.--Hot
Rod Hundley, West Virginia Uni-
versity's All - America basketball
star, has received notice to report
for induction into the Army today.
Hundley was acquired by the
Minneapolis Lakers as No. one
choice in the recent professional
National Basketball Association
draft.
DailysClassifieds
Bring Results

By AL JONES
It's a rough year for Big Ten
golf teams.
Jared Bushong and Fred Olm,
both of whom can play either
guard or tackle; Mike Fillichio,
guard; Mike Dupay and Doug Or-
vis, centers; and Doug Oppman,
guard.
Although Purdue, the defending
champion appears to, be on the
inside of the Conference race, it
will receive trouble from many
sides when the teams congregate
at Iowa City on May 24 and 25
for the championships.
The Big Ten is a stronger Con-
ference, golfwise, this year than it
has been in the past. Besides the
Boilermakers, headed by last
year's league medalist Joe Camp-
bell, there are five other squads
that could presumably come
through with a championship
squad.
Wisconsin Threatens
The list is headed by a fresh

Wisconsin team, which Wolverine
coach Bert Katzenmeyer feels has
the potential to give Purdue a real
run for the title.
A lot of light will be shed on
the race this Saturday here in
Ann Arbor when Purdue is chal-
leged by Michigan, Ohio State and
Michigan State. In two previous
meets the Boilermakers have suc-
cessfully defeated the Wolverines
and Buckeyes, but Katzenmeyer
states that both of these squads
have not been playing their best
golf.
Iowa May Surprise
Michigan State has their en-
tire squad back from last year,
and will be fielding one of the
strongest teams in many years.:
Its performance' this Saturday
may predict how strong it will be
in the Big Ten meet.
The sixth team that could show
well in Iowa City later this month
is the host team. The Hawkeyes
have a strong nucleus of veterans
back, and they will have the ad-
vantage of their home course for
the Conference finals.

ERNIE MYERS
... surprising third baseman
"my idol." Smith is a Michigan
graduate and now assistant foot-
ball coach at MSU who is actually
responsible for Ernie's association
with the "hot corner."
Smith was head baseball coach
at Northern when Myers reported
to him as a sophomore. Despite his
physical limitations (he was only
5'6" then and still is the lightest
on the Michigan squad at 150
pounds), Smith kept him at third
and Ernie certainly hasn't failed
him.
Big Thrills
Myers is hitting along at a .276
clip, although he ran into some-
what of a slump over the past
weekend. Probably his greatest
achievement thus far in the young
season was blasting a lead-off
home run off Ohio State's Galen
Cisco in his first appearance ever
in a Big Ten game. However, Ernie
still insists that his top thrill in
baseball was capturing the state
championship while playing for
the Flint American Legion.

I --

SHULTON PRODUCTS
can be purchased at

THE

QUfiRRY
NO 3-4121

320 South State

JULIAN MAY PLAY:
Saturday's Game Ends
Spring Football Drills

II I

By BOB ROMANOFF
Michigan will conclude its offi-
cial spring football practice with
a full-scale game-type scrimmage
Saturday in the Stadium.
The scrimmage starts at 2 p.m.
and the public will be admitted
free-of-charge.
Regulation quarters will be play-
ed but the game will continue
past the regular four-quarter limit
so that the coaches will have a
chance to watch all the candidates
for positions, on the Wolverine
squad display their wares.
Although a number of regulars
will be missing from the scrim-
mage because of paiticipation in
other sports or concentration on
studies, fans will still get a good
look at many of next year's stars.
The starters who will miss the
game are John Herrnstein and
Gene Snider, regulars on the base-
ball team, and Jim Pace, who is on
the track squad.
Two Positions
The two positions that Bennie
Oosterbaan and his coaches will
pay particular attention to are
right halfback and end.
At right half Mike Shatusky,
who played third string last year,
is considered to have the upper
hand for the starting assignment.
Oosterbaan, however, also has
three outstanding sophomore pros-

pects for the position. One is Fred
Julian, who might see only limited
action because of rib injuries sus-
tained in practice a couple of
weeks ago. The others are Al
Groce, one of the most pleasant
surprises in this year's spring
drills, and Brad Meyers, who has
shown flashes of brilliance.
Groce, who at the beginning of
drills was just another candidate,
has shown that he is a speedy and
shifty runner. Although he still
has alot of work to do on his
blocking, he has been, along with
Julian, the most impressive of the
newcomers.
End Prospects
At the end positions, aside from
lettermen Gary Prahst, Dave Bow-
ers and Walter Johnson, the out-
standing sophomore is Charles
Teuscher, who has a good chance
of being a regular next year. Be-
cause of an ankle injury Teuscher
also may see only limited action
during Saturday's scrimmage.

AT-
t- -
.F I-F"
MY FAIR OXFOR D

D~qACRON

&

COTTON

S

s

Scene: The London drawing
room of Professor Moriarity
Kitchener, philologist and elocu-
tionist. As curtain rises, Kit-,
chener is singing and dancing.
Kitchener: Why can't the Eng-
lish learn how to speak? Hey?
Why can't a woman be like a
man? What? Why can't any-
body grow accustomed to my
face? So?
Enter Gatsby Donothing, a
chimney sweep.
Donothing: P'arn me, Perfi-
zer K, oi w'd loik tao lorn 'ow
do spike e'en batterwise thun
oi spike naow.
Kitchener: Ugh! (Aside) Yet,'
he's a challenge. (To Donoth-
ing) All right, loathsome, in
six weeks, you'll be speaking
well enough to go to the Coro-
nation Ball!
Six weeks later.

Donothing: Sao, Prayfooser K,
can yez thank what me spikes
gentmanly aynuf naow? Do
we be gung to Coronation Ball
towgedder?
Kitchener: Oh, my Aunt Sally,
the blighter hasn't learned a
thing. I'm lost. But wait. I'll
dress him in a Van Heusen
Oxford cloth shirt. Then he'll
pass as a gentleman for sure!
All I have to do is be sure he
keeps his big mouth shut. I'm
saved, but good!
(Curtain)
Yes, friends, there's nothing
like Van Heusen Oxford cloth
shirts to make a gentleman of
you. Whether you prefer but-
ton-downs, other collars, white
or colors, see Van Heusen first.
And buy. $5.
Phillips-Jones Corp., 417 Fifth
Ave., New York 16, N. Y.

(75

0/

Dacron

25/

$

FOR
it.71b u :

% Cotton)
95

STORE- HOURS DAILY 9 TO 5:30
1 1A a B r 3 1r.t- k .. . r r r . I ..w..I."

III

iii Ii

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