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May 03, 1957 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1957-05-03

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FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1957

THE MICIFIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

W~TflAY. MAY 3.1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

" SET FOR MAY 11:
Pro-Westerners Gain Ground in Mid-Ea
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The University School of Busi-
ness Administration's 27th annual
alumni conference will be at-
tended by about 250 alumni Sat-
urday,-May 11.
Prof. S. R. Hepworth, of the ac-
counting department, is .chairman
of the alumni conference commit-
tee.
The first principal speaker at
the conference is Paul W. Mc-
Cracken on leave from the Uni-
versity to serve on the President's
Press Convention
Begins May 10
The Michigan Interscholastic
Press Association's 30th annual
convention will be held Friday,
May 10, at the University.
University journalism profes-
sors participating in the conven-
tion are department chairman
Wesley H. Maurer, Kenneth Stew-
art, Karl Zeisler, Dean Baker, and
James C. MacDonald.
Arrangements for the conven-
tion will be directed by Prof. John
V. Field, director of MIPA. Doris
Fleeson, political reporter, syndi-
cated Washington columnist will
present the keynote address, in
the morning at the Lecture Hall.
Joseph M. Murphy, director of
the Columbia Scholastic Press As-
sociation will speak at the lunch-
eon session in the Michigan Un-
ion.
Other sessions including in-
struction in yearbook production,
editorials and news stories will be
conducted by teachers, professors
and journalists in these fields.

Council of Economic Advisers. He
will speck on "Long Term Econ-
omic Development" at the lunch-
eon meeting in the Michigan Un-
ion.
Second speaker Malcolm P. Fer-
guson, president of Bendix Avia-
tion Corp. will discuss "The Im-
pact of Technological Develop-
ment of Corporate Operation."
The third speaker will be Har-
old S. Schroeder whose subject is
"The Impact of Technological De-
velopment on Employee Rela-
tions." Ferguson and Schroeder
will address the morning session
at 10 a.m. in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
The afternoon session which is
divided into five specialized pro-
grams will run from 2:30 to 4:00
p.m. in the School of Business Ad-!
ministration building.!
Prof. William J. Schlatter is
chairman of the accounting pro-
gram on "The Accountant's Role
in Management". Speakers will be
Lawrence C. Hobart, partner in
Scovell, Wellington & Co., De-
troit, and Alfred T. Joldersma,
vice president of the Kawneer Co.,
Niles.
Prof. C. James Pilcher, of the
finance department will chair the
program on "Financing Business
in 1957."
Detroit executives discussing
the subject will be Milton J.
Drake, vice president, The De-
troit Bank and Trust Co.; T. Ken-
neth Haven, vice president, De-
trex Chemical Industries, Inc.;
and William M. Adams, president,
Braun, Bosworth and Co.

Walker Chairs
Psycholog ial
Symposium
Members of the psychology de-
partment will participate in the
Midwest Psychological Associa-
tion meeting today through Satur-
day in Chicago.
Prof. Edward Walker will be
chairman of two symposia on
"Decremental Effects," and'
"Mathematical Models in Psy-
chology." His paper on "Action
Decrement and Its Relation to
Learning", will also be presented.
Papers to be presented include
"Responses to Specific Stimulus
Dimensions in Discrimination
Learning" by James Ison and Wil-
liam Hayes, and "A Discrimina-
tion Analysis of Attention Phe-
nomena" is the subject of a paper
to be presented by Max S. Schoef-
fler of the Engineering Research
Institute.
Bids Submitted
For Music School
Construction bids on the Music
School building on North Campus
have been submitted to the State
Department of Administration and
legislative committees, University
Vice-President Wilbur K. Pier-
pont, in charge of business and fi-
nance, announced recently.
The bids, which are approxi-
mately $600,000 below the antici-
pated cost of $4,500,000, are sub-
ject to acceptance within 30 days
from April 25.
Centralized facilities for music
students will ge provided by the
new building. This will replace
space now scattered in numerous
buildings on the main campus.

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
.COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 31 to June 11, 1957
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
10 and 11 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to he schedtuling committee.
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates
Mon. Mon. Tues. Tues.
Regular June 10 June 10 June 11 June 11
Exam Time 9-12 AM 2-5 PM 9-12 AM 2-5 PM
Special Mon. Tues. Thurs. Fri.
Peid June 3 June 4 June 6 June 7
Period 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

4.._ ..

By DAVID L. BOWEN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer1
Secretary of State John Fostert
Dulles' attempts to fashion a pat-1
tern favorable to the West out of
the Middle Eastern jigsaw puzzle
gained ground last week.
Young King Hussein's success in
riding out a storm inspired byy
promoters of Egyptian President,
Gamal Abdel Nasser as the one
true prophet of Arab nationalisms
indicated to both the Arabs and
the world that Nasser rules only in
Cairo.
It also may prove to be the first1
evidence of a new triumvirate of
Arab power--a royal combine join-
ing King Hussein of Jordan, King
Saud of Saudi Araabia and King
Feisal of Iraq. This union of three,
key pieces in the Middle Eastern
puzzle reportedly has been a goal
of the State Department for some
time.-
Troops Prepared to Fight
Although President Eisenhow-
er's dramatic move to dispatch
the Sixth Fleet back to the East-;
ern Mediterranean strengthened
Hussein's hand at a crucial mo-
ment, Egyptian and Syrian ad-
venturers had earlier been faced
with clear evidence that Saudi
Arabian and Iraqi troops were
prepared to fight for Hussein's
throne.
The Iraqi troops had been mass-
ed near Jordan's eastern bound-
ary. Three thousand Saudi Arab-
ian troops at Jericho were pub-
licly placed under Hussein's com-
mand.
This support for Hussein by
Iraq came as no surprise. Feisal
and. Hussein are cousins. In addi-
tion to this tie of Hashemite
blood, Feisal is the most pro-
Western ruler of the Middle East.
His nation is the only member of
the old Arab League to join the

Baghdad Pace, the Western anti-
Communist alliance which Nasser
has fought bitterly.
The motive for King Saud's
support of Hussein is more diffi-
cult to ascertain. Saud's father
drove the Hashemites out of
modern Saudi Arabia only 30-odd
years ago and the ill-feeling then
generated has been a long time
dying.
Motive for Support
One explanation for Saud's de-
cision to help Hussein out is that
the Arabian king was greatly im-
pressed by President tEisenhower
during his Washington visit last
year and firmly holds that the
Arabs should not alienate the
West. Thus he threw his weight
behind Hussein when he saw vio-
lent elements threatening to bring
Jordan into the Egypt-Syria axis,
the core of the pro-Communist
movement in the Middle East.
The net effect of Saud's move
was' to counterbalance Egyptian-
Syrian pressure against Hussein
with Saudi Arabian-Iraqi pressure
for him.

Although the shrewd Arabian
king early this week seemed in-
tent on easing the blow to Egypt
by cooperating in moves to patch
up the rift in the Arab nations, a
grand Arab alliance led by an
"invincible" Nasser. apparently is
not to his liking.
If he holds to this opinion, and
if the "three kings" in Iraq, Jor-
dan and Saudi Arabia stick to-
gether in the future, President
Nasser's star will lose considerable
brilliance.

-CAMPUS-
211 S. Stat.
NO 8-9013
-DOWNTOWN-
205 L Libert
NO 2-0675
for the Finest in Recorded husic

B'NAI B'RITH
Hillel Foundation
Friday Evening Services
Conducted by ZETA BETA TAU
ONEG SHABBOT following at Z.B.T. House
SERVICES at 7:30

Time of Class

Time of Examination

MONDAY
TUESDAY

(at
(at
at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Saturday, June 1
Monday, June 3
Tuesday, June 4
Friday, May 31
Thursday, June 6
Thursday, June 6
Friday, June 7
Saturday, June 8
Tuesday, June 4
Monday, June 3
Saturday, June 1
Wednesday, June 5
Friday, June 7
Saturday, June 8
Thursday, June 6

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

SENIORS!
We've just received

1

-- -E

a shipment of engraved
Graduation Announcements
Buy yours today
at
FO LLETT'S
State St. at N. University
Read the Classifieds

Broadway Comes To Ann Arbor
DISTINGUISHED AUTHORS IN
THEIR GAYEST MOODS
MUSIC
COMEDY
MYSTERY
ROMANCE
1957 Drama Season

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

i

Botany 2, 122
Bus. Ad. 11
Bus. Ad. 12
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 14
Chemistry 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101,
153
Economics 71
Economics 72
English 1, 2
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32,
61, 62
German 1, 2, 11, 32
Naval Science 102, 202, 302, 402
Political Science 2
Psychology 167, 173, 226, 256
Sociology 1, 4, 101
Sociology 60
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31, 32,

Friday, June 7
Thursday, June 6
Thursday, June 6
Saturday, June 8
Saturday, June 8
Friday, May 31
Thursday, June 6
Thursday, June 6
Friday, May 31
Monday, June 10
Monday, June 10
Wednesday, June 5
Tuesday, June 11
Friday, May 31
Wednesday, June 5
Saturday, June 8
Tuesday, June 11

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
7-10 p.m.
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
7-10 p.m.
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12'

I

CONGRATULATE THE GRADUATE WITH
A HE'LL REMEMBER!
from
O 'MEGA
SEALS WATER OUT.,.SEALS ACCURACY IN...
What better companion on the road to success
than an Omega ... the watch preferred by
graduates everywhere. Self-winding, non-magnetic,
shock and water-resistant, the incomparable
Omega Seamaster is unaffected by dust or moisture,
grime or water; immune to Arctic cold of' tropic
heat. The Seamaster features a non-breakable
steel-rimmed crystal which expands and contracts
with climatic changes, Hermetic Crown and
Hydro-Seal Back give increased immunity to
perspiration. Omega Seamaster is truly at the
"head of the class" in fine graduation gifts.

i

Edward Everett Horton

Uta Hagen

5 WEEKS-S PLAYS
GALA OPENING MAY 13
CAROL BRUCE in "LADY IN THE DARK"
The great musical comedy which took the country by storm .Book by Moss Hart, Music by Kurt Weill,
Lyrics by Ira Gershwin. Also starring SCOTT McKAY with a professional cast of 40.
GEOFFREY LUMB-JOAN ALEXANDER
GENE LYONS
in their original Broadway roles in the sensational mystery melodrama
"WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION" by Agatha Christie (May 20-25)
FRANCIS LEDERER-JOAN McCRACKEN
TAMARA GEVA

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

I

I

A. E. 130
C.E. 20
C. E. 21
C. M. 22
C. E. 151
Draw. 1, 22
Draw. 2, 33
Draw. 12
E. E. 5
E. M. 1
E. M. 2
*E. M. 1, 3
English 10, 11
I. E. 100, 110
I. E. 120
M. E.2
M. E. 32, 132
Naval Science
Physics 53
Physics 54

Saturday, June 8
Wednesday, uJne 5
Friday, May 31
Monday, June 10
Friday, May 31
Friday, May 31
Tuesday, June 11
Monday, June 10
Wednesday, June 5
Monday, June 10
Wednesday, June 5
Tuesday, June 11
Wednesday, June 5
Saturday, June 8
Friday, May 31
Monday, June 10
Tuesday, June 11
Wednesday, Junes
Tuesday, June 11
Friday, May 31

9-12
t 9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
7-10 p.m.
9-12
2-5

102, 202, 302, 402

in the Broadway comedy hit of this season
"THE SLEEPING PRINCE" by Terence Rattigan (May 27-June

1),

U

I

UTA HAGEN-HERBERT BERGHOF
in a sparkling saga of Viennese life
"THE AFFAIRS OF ANATOL" by Arthur Schnitzler (June 3-8)
EDWARD EVERETT HORTON
in the hilarious farce from the current Broadway season

*Conflict Exam. This period is to be used only by those having
a schedule conflict in E. M. 1 or 2 at the regular hour.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTION
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between April 26 and
May 13 for Instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

I

"THE RELUCTANT DEBUTANTE" by William Douglas Home
Season Ticket Prices
Evenings thru Thursday
Main Floor: $14.00, $12.00
Balcony: $14.00, $12.00, $10.00
Friday and Saturday
" "i,' '" ".'-'-.'"..z:;' y,' < a :.- n i ...nnr 1 e c- n g, A n

(June 10-15),

In stair
hand, 1
14K gol
All 14K
with da

inless steel, $95; with sweep second
1105. 14K gold-filled, $120.
ld-top, with stainless steel back, $160.
gold case, $225. Calendar models
te indicators from$140. Luminous Awarded the Olympic cr551

1I

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SIII

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