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April 19, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i
FRIDAY, APRIL 29,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE PIV

FRIDAY, APRIL 19,1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAflK IWU
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Campus Prepares for Easter Celebration

Holy Services Set
For Good Friday
To Christians throughout the
world the three hours from noon
to 3 p.m. today represent the
agony and death of their Saviour
on the cross nearly 2,000 years
ago.
In Ann Arbor, churches will
open their doors to those who wish
to spend the three hours at serv-
ices in remembrance of the Cruci-
fixion. Good Friday is the last
observance of the Holy Week be-
fore Easter Sunday.
Protestant denominations will
hold a united service at noon at
First Methodist Church. The serv-
ice will include the "Seven Last
Words of Christ" sung by com-
bined choirs and soloists. The serv-
ice will describe in music the last
words of Christ beginning with
"Father, into thy hands I com-
mend my spirit."
All Catholic services today will
include "Stations of the Cross"
services. The ceremony is built
around fourteen stages of the Cru-
cifixion which are depicted on the
walls of Catholic churches by fig-
ures or plaques. The priest con-
ducting the service goes from
stage to stage, stopping at each
one for prayer.
St. Mary's Student Chapel will
hold its ceremony at 1:15 p.m.
today. Confession will be at 8 p.m.
St. Thomas Church will begin
services at 12:30 p.m. with lessons
from the Old Testament, Solemn
Singing of the Passion, Adoration
of the Cross and Holy Communion.
St. Francis of Assisi Church will

Students To

Give

Hospital

Parties

The League and Union are co-
sponsoring an Easter party for
shut-ins at Ann Arbor area hos-
pitals from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday.
Entertainment will be provided
by students acts. Among the stu-
dents in the show are Gale Rey-
nolds who will be dressed as a
clown and performing on a uni-
cycle and dancer Libbie Jo Snyder.
Gersham Morningstar will sing
folk songs to the patients. A song
and dance routine by Carolyn Al-
buE is another of the show's acts.
Al Wall, custodian at the Phi
Gamma Delta house, will enter-
tain patients will his guitar play-
ing and singing
Native dancing by Sybil Wong,
a Hawaiian, and Colle Hunt's sing-
ing are other performances of the
show.
Sings Like Presley
In his Elvis Presley style, Jim
Shedlowsky will sing to the group.
Larry Rottner will sing while ac-
companying himself. Twirling the
baton will be Joe Brown's act.
The group of entertainers will
visit University Hospital, Veterans
Hospital, Ypsilanti State Hospital,
Simpson Memorial Hospital and
the Ann Arbor Convalescent Home.
Favors for the party are being
made by the sorority members.
The favors vary from chickens
made of yellow yarn that will deco-
rate the serving trays to edible
gum drops and colored marshmal-
lows decorated as little people with
accessories of toothpicks, pipe
cleaners and umbrellas.
Other sororities are making col-
lar stands to hold decorated Easter
eggs.
To Serve Refreshments
Hats made of paper plates with
two balloons as Easter Bunny ears
will be worn by the younger child-
ren they visit. Favors resembling aI
newborn chicken were made for
other shut-ins.
The hostesses for the Easter
party will be provided by the
League. Hostesses will talk to the
patients as they pass out favors
and serve refreshments. Song
sheets will be distributed for group
singing.

--CAMPUS--
11 S. State
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Antonina Mikiczenka and Jeep Hnatczuk perform a Ukranian dance.
ISA Completes State Tour;
To Give Talent Show Here

-Daily-John Hirtzel
HOLY WEEK SERVICES -- Christians of all denominations
gathered in churches for Maundy Thursday prayers last night.
Today they will again leave their campus and community duties
to attend Good Friday services.
hold Mass of the Pre-sanctified at Communion services last night,
1:45 p.m. and Stations of the Cross Maundy Thursday.
at 7.30 p.m. There have been no schedule
There will be only a few evening changes by the University and
services throughout the city this classes will be held as usual today
evening. Most churches had Holy with no recess from 12 to 3 p.m.

By CAROL LEVINE
During spring vacation, amidst
the world's troubles, a group of
international students, speaking
many different languages, and
dressed in their colorful native
costumes, laid aside all national
barriers to tour the state of Michi-
gan with a show packed full of
talent.
Under the direction of Muffy
McKay and Bill West the students
visited eight cities. Local organi-
zations sponsored the show and
provided home hospitality for the
entertainers.
Because of popular demand the
same show will be presented at 8
p.m. Friday, April 26, in Auditor-
ium A, Angell Hall.
Receiving wide acclaim from all
viewers, the acts are of a great
variety. The country of Puerto
Rico is well represented by' two
dance teams. Elba Rodriguez and
Adolfo Jiminez will do a plena
while Carmon Santos and Ra-
mone Pagen will perform a folk
dance. Fernando Salamo is a vo-
calist from this country.
Two "Incredible Dancing Belles"
from Germany, Ulrike Klopfer and
Waltraut Hoebbel will entertain
the audiences with a parody of a
German operetta.
Also entertaining will be stu-
dents from India, Nicaragua, Ha-

Ir

11

waii, Japan, Ukraine, the United
States, Iraq and Turkey,
Master of ceremonies for the
talent show will be Gunay Atkay
from Turkey.

UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN FEDERATION
(Interguild)
SPEAKER: CHARLES E. HUMMEL
April 21, 6:30 A.M. Steps of Main Library
After-Service Breakfast at Congregational Church
In event of rain. the service will be held
in the Congregational Church.

AID CHILDREN'S WORKSHOP:
Galens Provide Service to City, Campus

I

By ELEANOR GOLDBERG
Every December, the 28 mem-
bers of Galens Medical Society
venture into the Ann Arbor streets
to campaign for one of their nu-
merous service projects, the Chil-
dren's Workshop.
The shop program has risen
from a very limited activity,
started in 1928, to the most ex-
tensive program in the country
today, according to Bob Kretzsch-
mar, Galens' president. In its ini-
tial collection drive, the society
was able to raise only $600, while
last year, it raised $7,750.
In addition to the workshop,
the society also ' maintains a
newsstand started in 1941 in Uni-
versity Hospital as a service for
patients, their relatives and hos-
pital servants.
Hospital Newsstand
The newsstand is maintained by
members of Galens and the profits
* are use to fill student needs in
the hospital which state funds do
not cover.
The society also annually con-
tributes $2,000 to a medical stu-
dent loan fund, which now con-
tains $15,000.
Another part of the profits is
used for scholarship funds and
academic prizes.
One "tremendously successful"
project which was instituted in
1931 and is now nearing comple-

tion, is the tuberculosis survey for
medical and nursing students.
This is a program of screening
X-rays, skin testing and giving
preventive vaccinations.
Originally, there was a great in-
cidence of TB among students
who were in contact with the dis-
ease, and at any given time, three
to seven were hospitalized. In the
last five years, only one medical
student has contracted the dis-
ease.
The organization has assumed
much of the initial cost of the
medical photography department,
and has even hired people to staff
this department. The first medi-
cal school honor system, which
Galens played a major role in or-
ganizing, has achieved national
recognition.
Orientation Pamphlets
Providing for student needs, Ga-
lens has written an orientation
pamphlet for incoming freshmen,
has set up medical school student
lounges, and has sponsored lec-
turers from other schools each
year.
"A sounding board of medical
student opinion for the faculty,"
Galens serves what was intended
to be its original purpose, to cre-
ate "student-faculty liason."
Each spring, Galens depart
from their more serious projects
to sponsor a smoker, at which they
produce a show for medical stu-

dents. Their ability to make as-
tounding parodies on the faculty
without repercussion illustrates
the success of their aim to keep
student-faculty relations on a
friendly basis.
Liason Body
In its function as a liason body,
Galens handles student problems
with the faculty and vice versa.
Minor complaints concerning any-
thing from academic difficulties
to social activities are discussed.
Among the original members
who formed Galens in 1914 is the
present dean of the medical
school, Albert C. Furstenberg. The
society takes its name from an
ancient Greek physician.
Membership is limited to junior
and senior medical students. Two
juniors and two seniors from each
of the five medical fraternities
and four independents from each
class are chosen annually.
Dr. Richard C. Schneider is fac-
ulty advisor for the Galens.

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SEE YOU EASTER!

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Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street
"Some Dominant Movements
in Modern Jewish Life"
TONIGHT: RECONSTRUCTIONISM
DR. HERMAN JACOBS,
Director of B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
at the University of Michigan
SERVICES AT 7:30 P.M.

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UNDENOMINATIONAL CHRISTIANITY!
Using as our Pattern the Church of the New Testament,
we urge you to join with us in this great Revival effort
Hear T. H. SHERRILL
Well-known evangelist of Newport, Ark.,
in a series of BACK-TO-THE-BIBLE messages.
EASTER SUNDAY through MAY 1st
Each Evening at 7:30
e Learn the Doctrine and Practice of the early
Church. Find out how you can be JUST A
CHRISTIAN, wearing only the name of Christ.
IT DOES MATTER WHAT WE BELIEVE!
'ZWe are to "Contend earnestly for the faith".

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