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April 19, 1957 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-04-19

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,IDA'Y, AY M 19,1957

TIDE MICHIGAN DAiL Y

PAGLrw TTM

~RWAY, APRIL 19, 1937 TINE MICITIGAN DAILY

z nut innGG

i

AREND-ROLAND NEARS EARTH:

PostsOnen:FOR MORE THAN 'NEEDY':

Astronomers

Wait for Comet

l-

SGC Awaits
P etitions
All-campus petitioning for four
Student Government Council com-
mittee chairmanships has been ex-
tended to noon today, according to
Administrative Vice-President Ron
Shorr, '58BAd.
Ten petitions have been returned
for SGC's Student Activities Com-
mittee, Education and Social Wel-
fare Committee, National and In-
ternational Relations Committee,
Public Relations Committee, and
Elections Director and Office Man-
ager posts. Several more have been
taken out.
* * *
Canadian National Student As-
sociation is offering three scholar-
ships to a series of seminars with
African countries, including Ni-
geria, Ghana, and Kenya.
Scholarships will pay all expen-
ses from Montreal to the seminars
and back.
Seminars will begin on May 25
and last throughout the summer.
Interested students should contact
Anne Woodard, chairman of Inter-
national Affairs committee by to-
morrow.
* * *
There are seven e'penings on
Student Government Council's
South-East Asia Steering Com-
mittee.
This committee will draw up a
prospectus, procure funds and
select and train delegates for a trip
to Southeast Asian countries next
summer.
Thursday is the deadline for all
petitions.
Students interested in attending
the National Student Congress in
Ann Arbor this summer may apply
for delegate and alternate posi-
tions.
Delegates from 1500 colleges
across the country will meet to
decide policies and programs for
the United States National Stu-
dent Association from August 20
to 30.
Petitioners must be active in
student government in any of the
major student organizations.
There will also be a Student Edi-
torial Affairs Conference from
August 17 to 20 immediately pre-
ceding the NSA Conference. This
conference will be concerned with
the roles and responsibilities of
the campus press to the student
body, campus and local commun-
ity.
All student editors and their
representatives are eligible to at-
tend.
By working a certain amount of
time on the Student Government
Council secretariat during the
conference, non-delegates may get
their expenses paid.
Petitions for any of these activi-
ties may be obtained from Mrs.
Ruth Callahan, Assistant to the
Dean of Men, in the Student Af-
fairs Office of Student Activities
Bldg.

3 1

Conception of Social Work Changing

4>

By SARAH DRASIN

With improved educational and
practice facilities. the old concep-
tion of a social caseworker as pri-
marily an administrator of relief
to "the needy" is rapidly disap-
pearing, according to Eleanor G.
Cranefield, casework coordinator
of the School of Social Work.
"The modern social caseworker
is well-prepared for the great chal-
lenge of his or her job," Prof.
Cranefield emphasizes, "and is
prepared for a great deal more
than merely relief work."
'U' Has 'Human Laboratory'
Citing the plan of the University
School of Social Work as an ex-
ample of the new trend toward
broader preparatory education in
this field, she states that the school
endeavors to supply a "human lab-
oratory" along with instruction in
academic theory.
Starting in the first year of a
two-year graduate course which
leads to a master's degree, the
casework student is assigned to a
social agency and is considered by
that agency as a regular employee.
Coordinating his work with class
material under the guidance of a
teacher, the student is urged to ex-
plore the problems which he has
confronted in practice. I
For this work, the student is
given four hours credit, and in the
second year the casework load is
increased to three days a week.
Seminars are also held every two
weeks with other caseworkers to
integrate their "internship" ex-
periences with the theories being
studied.
Three Areas of Study
An attempt to cover three areas
of study is made. These three areas
are a study of the historical 'and

--Daily-Norman Jacobs
DISTRAUGHT FATHER of a mentvlly ill patient at the Veteran's
Administration Hospital listens to a social caseworker explain how
the family may help. Social workers are often employed in institu-
tions of this sort to handle many of the "human" problems which
occur.

-Courtesy, University of Michigan Observatories
COMET AREND-ROLAND-Newly discovered Coamet Arend-Roland is expected to move within 52 million miles of earth tonight. Weather
permitting, it will be visible just after sunset low in the northwest. In this picture, taken on the night of Jan. 1-2, 1957, at the University
Observatory,'one division on the scale equals 83,000 kilometers or about 51,576 miles, and the comet, including tail, is about 309,000 miles
long.

Michigras Petitions
Petitions for men general co-
chairmen of 1958 Michigras may
be obtained from 3 to 5 p.m. start-
ing today in the Union Student
Offices.
Deadline for petitions is April
29 and those interested should
contact the Union senior officers
for information, the Union an-I
nounced.

economic backgrounds of the social
services, human growth and be-
havior and practice theory courses
which are then applied in practical
work.
The applied work is carried out
in two types of agencies, according
to Prof. Cranefield. "In the 'social
service' area, the work is with
such agencies as adoption, place-
ment counseling and public assist-
ance," she says.
"The second area of agency
work," Prof. Cranefield explains,
"is in subordinate positions of
larger agencies such as hospitals
where social problems may occur."
Growing Social Research
.Social casework, however, she
says, is not entirely limited to ad-
ministering directly to people.
There is now a growing field in
research, planing and executing
surveys for state and community
service organizations.

Another rather recent develop-
ment, Prof. Cranefield continues,
has been in the field of "on-the-
job" training. An effort is being
made to provide state corrections
and parole officers with "post-
graduate" courses in prison, proba-
tion and parole administration.
Old Conception Outdated
"So you see, the old conception
of the social caseworker, his pre-
paration and his job is very much
outdated."
Prof. Cranefield, herself a vet-
eran of manly years in the field,
concludes, "Social casework has
grown and is still growing rapidly
I have found it, as many others
have, a thoroughly fascinating
field."
for only $695.97 complete
you. can attend the 69th
WORLD
YOUTH
FESTIVAL
in MOSCOW"
July 28th to August 'l, 1957
for further information:
U.S. Youth Festival Committee
Box 5793, Main Post Office
Chicago, Illinois, ESsex 5-1447

n

By EDWARD GERULDSEN
Astronomers around the world
will be keeping a close eye on the
sky this weekend in hopes for
clear weather and a close look at
Comet Arend-Roland, due to swing
in close to the earth tonight.
Among the watchers will be
those at the University Observa-
tory. Prof. Freeman Miller, of the
astronomy department, is in
charge of Project Arend-Roland
here.
If not for heavy overhead clouds
all week, the comet would have
been visible to the naked eye for
the past several days, particularly
tonight, when it will be closest-
about 52 million miles. The best
time to look for it is just after
sunset, low in the northwest.
To Lose Brilliance
Between now and about June 1,
Comet Arend-Roland will gradu-
ally lose brilliance and finally fade
away until it is invisible to the
Harrison To Talk
On Shakespeare
Professor G. B. Harrison of the
English department will deliver a
lecture on Shakespeare's "Richard
III" on Tuesday, April 23, at 4
p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Prof. Harrison, eminent Shakes-
pearean scholar, author and critic,
will deliver his lecture in conjunc-
tion with the speech department's
performance of "Richard III"
which will be presented at..8 p.m.
on April 25, 26 and 27 in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater.
The play will also be, given a
special matinee performance for
high school students at 2:30 p.m.,
April 27.

unaided eye, as it rises higher in
the sky and moves farther away
from the sun.
There is speculation that Arend-
Roland will prove to be the first
really bright comet to come into
our view since the last appearance
of the famous Halley's Comet in
1910. Halley's is due to pass close
to earth again in 1984.
Sighted in November
Comet Arend-Roland was first
sighted Nov. 8, 1956, by S. Arend
and G. Roland of the Royal Ob-
servatory at Uccle, Belgium. At
its debut, it was a faint, hazy ob-
ject, visible only through a tele-
scope.
Since then, its motion has been
carefully studied and enough
learned about it to predict that it
will pass within 30 million miles
of the sun and 52 million miles of
the earth. It will pass closest to
the earth on its way back into
outer space.
During its travel toward the
sun, Arend-Roland developed quite
a large head and a long tail. Some
of its material may have been lost
in passing near the sun, but as-
tronomers have reason to believe
it will retain most of its substance.
To Use Modern Instruments
Its appearance tonight will be
met with a battery of modern in-
struments in hopes of finding out
more about comets in general and
Arend-Roland in particular.
One important new instrument
to be used is the radio telescope. If
the comet contains free chemical
radicals as expected, the fragments
should be affected by sunlight and
made to emit radio waves.
Measurement of the wave lengths
produced can be used to determine
what substances are present.
Scientists at the Naval Research
Laboratory in Washington will be

looking especially for waves from
Hydroxl (OH) radicals.
The results of these investiga-
tions may permit tracing the comet
back into interstellar space, and
gaining more information about
what the universe is made of and
where and how comets originate.
Little is known about the origin
or composition of comets, but
there are numerous plausible
theories about both.
Dimensions Great
The head of a comet may be,
many thousands of miles in dia-
meter and the tail many million
miles long. The light from a comet
is believed to derive partly from
reflection of sunlight, partly from
the fluorescing of its atoms or
molecules under the influence of
sunlight.
Comets have little in common
with planets, in that they are far
smaller and are not solid, waxing
and waning unpredictably.
Comet orbits are elongated ellip-
ses, which in the majority of cases
are almost parabolic, not essenti-
ally circular as are planetary or-
bits.
Thai Exhibition
Thai Association will present a
program showing different aspects
of Siamese culture at 7:45 p.m. to-
morrow in Lane Hall.
The program will feature art of
Thailand, traditional dances and

Because of their infrequent and
irregular appearance, a great deal
of fear and superstition has grown
up around them:
Comets have been regarded as
the causes or foretellers of great
events in the world's history,
among them earthquakes, floods,
tidal waves, droughts, wars, fam-
ines, epidemics, plagues, volcanic
eruptions and the birth or death
of great men in history.
Comets are believed by some to
have announced the birth of
Christ and of Mohammed, and
the deaths of Emperors Constan-
tine and Claudius. One particularly
brilliant comet which appeared in
43 B.C. was believed by the Rom-
ans to be the soul of Julius Caesar.
Comet Foretells Destruction
The destruction of Jerusalem in{
the year 69 by Titus Vespasian was
supposed to have been foretold by
the appearance of a comet. And a
comet of very large size and bril-
liance which appeared in 1456 was
considered an annnouncement of
the success of the Turks under
Mohammed II, who was then en-
gaged in the subjugation of the
Christian nations.
The list of events associated with
comets is long and impressive.
Most people today scoff at such
superstition and regard cometal
"influence" as coincidence, but
people in many parts of the globe
will be anxiously awaiting the con-
sequences of the visit of Comet

itf0S a PIPE
AND A GOOD ONE, TOO,
When purchased from
1 18 East Huron - Opposite County Bldg.

r
=J'

Daily Classifieds
.f~ , .IY 1A rl-

There's always a sale
at BOB MARSHALL'S

an exhibition of Siamese boxing. Arend-Roland. ri n esuits l-
FOR INFORMATION Ann Arbor s
CALL NOW... NO 2-3972
Mary Lou
JIM SERVIS TONIGHT

Newest and Finest ...

Don't forget Dad

I

on Easter Day

I

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-1

V*4 k4 * , or v

UNION THEATER TRIP

F

"DAMN YANKEES"
Tuesday, April 23

PIZZ

at i1

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appreciate a hirt
and Tie for Easter"

TASTE THE
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. . , n.,

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