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February 09, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1''AGE T'' Pt)

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y'

PAETO_-_IHG N AL AT1.lVVWf1TAUV 6'

.r ' x- t.a, -.I L'4a%,,aava ..3! 7 7

r

KURSHILDGEN ADVISES:
'U' Offers Counseling
On Military Questions

II

I

I
I

I

By MICHAEL KRAFT
With the armed forces under-
going a streamlining process and
draft quotas reaching a lower level,
the threat of "greetings" from the
government is fading in impor-
tance to most students.
Yet, some two dozen University
students were drafted from school
during the past semester and
numerous others have been on the
verge, according to the University's
selective service counsellor, J. Wes-
ley Kurshildgen of the Office of
Registration and Records.
policy, Kurshildgen provides ad-
Maintaining and "open door"
vice and information for students
with questions or problems re-
garding their draft status.
"The problems are many," the
counselor said. In one day 40 stu-
dents may seek advice.
"Then, there are the days when
only five or six may stop in. I
may spend anywhere from two
minutes to two hours with the
men, who usually have a variety
of questions."
Question Status
Many of those questions concern
a student's status, deferment pol-
cies, selective service tests. and
how changes in educational status
affect selective service status.
The office maintains a complete
file of the Public Law, Selective
Service regulations, and memor-
anda from local draft boards.
"Actually we have as much or
Hungarians
Of R isals
(Continued from Page 1)

off, but we knew there was shoot-
ing and people being killed," he
said.
On November 4, Russian tanks
moved into Beszprem. Students
threw explosives at the tanks from
the dormitory buildings. Several
students were imprisoned and
later deported. Sixty of them have
not been returned, he said.
Andrew decided .to leave the
country in spite of the pleas of
his parents who wanted the whole
family to stay together. "In Hun-
gary," he said, "all people do is
work for no reason, they r -e starv-
ing and have patches in their
clothes.
'Always Afraid'
"We are always afraid," he con-
tinued. "One can't tell his thoughts
and ideas even to his best friends."
Among the other Hungarian
students registering for their first
day of classes at the English Lan-
guage Institute were Joseph Csehi,
who carried a 10-year-old letter
from Hungary to the United
States. By means of this letter he
located relatives in Romulus with
whom he is now living.
Janos Demeter, a lawyer and
political economist, holds three
doctorates from the University of
Budapest. He is living in a resi-
dence provided by the Newman
Club.
Ivan Kovac, a '27-year-old clin-
ical psychologist, is holder of the
Ann Arbor Rotary Club scholar-
ship which will take care of all his
maintenance costs.
Other Students
Among the other rebel students
registering for the Institute are
Lazlo Binko, a mechanical engi-
neer, Ethel Csomos, a teacher, Ga-
bor Erdelyi, a Hungarian philoso-
pher and Tamas Sebastyan whose
brother is in engineering school.
All 24 Hungarian students have
been supplied with English Lan-
guage Institute grants and room
and board.
Maintenance offers came large-
ly from Ann Arbor religious groups
and townspeople.
James M. Davis, director of the
International Center, said coop-
eration with the scholarship and
maintenance program for the
Hungarians was generally very
good.
U.S. Top Scientiss
Meet at Rackham
Over 500 representatives of in-
dustry, government and educa-
'tion attended a secret-level radar
symposium held in the Rackham
Building this week.

more contact with the local boards
as we do with the students," Kurs-
hildgen said.
The office continually receives
requests for information on stu-
dents and a Selective Service file
is kept on every male student.
Primary duties of the military
counselor is certification of stu-
dents with their draft. boards.
Responsible for sending the sec-.
and section of the registration
"railroad" ticket to the draft
boards, the office also handles re-
cords of those taking the Selective
Service Deferment test and all
correspondence w i t h Selective
Service boards on matters con-
cerning change of status includ-
ing marriage, probation, and
changes from full to part-time.
Should Notify Board
"However, every .student en-
rolled at the Uniersity is supposed
to notify the draft board of his
new address within 10 days after
arrival on campus," Kurshildgen
pointed out.
"The purpose of form number
two on the registration ticket is
merely torelieve the University
from writing letters to each board
to inform them the student is en-
rolled," he said.
He recalled that "We keep get-
ting students whose time to apply
for a student deferment had ex-
pired because the notice arrived
from home too late." Then they
can not get deferment.
"A man can be deferred only
when he receives his first induc-
tion notice. Then he can postpone
his military service until the end
of the school year if he meets the
necessary requirements.
Must be Full-Time Student
A student wishing to be deferred
must be a full time student carry-
ing 12 or niore hours, working to-
wards a degree and in good aca-
demic standing.
Selective service tests and satis-
factory class standing are the evi-
dence that a school submits to the
local draft board for its considera-
tion of a student's deferment," the
counselor pointed out.
Stressing the autonomy of the
local draft goard, Kurshildgen said
"I think it's important to realize
that a man's status with Selective
Service is as individual and per-
sonal as his relationship to his
family and academic career."
"The board votes on each indi-
vidual case according to its own
merits, and we often have to dig
deeply into a student's personal
background to find all the quali-
fications to help him," Kurshild-
gen said.
Whom a board decides to draft
depends on its quotas, armed
forces requirements, and the world
situation. When a board becomes
pinched to fill a quota, "then
watch the feathers fly," the coun-
selor warned.
Losh Predicts
Coldest Period
In February
February should be the coldest
month of the year, according to
Prof. Hazel M. Losh of the .stron-
omy department.
Prof. Losh explains that this is
due to the "lag of the season. The
atmosphere acts like a blanket and
holds back some of the heat that
falls on its surface."
For some time after Dec. 21, the
shortest day of the year, Prof.
Losh says the northern hemisphere
is losing more heat at night than
can be repiaced by the sun on the
shorter-tnan-average days.
As long as this rate of heating
falls below the rate of cooling, the
temperature continues to drop.
Prof. Losh also points out the
days are growing noticebly longer.
By the end of the month the sun
will be shining more than 11

hours.
IFC Signs 250
Men in Rushing
Approximately 250 men have al-
ready signed up for spring se-
mester fraternity rushing, accord-
ing to Lou Kolb, '59, of the Inter-
fraternity Council rushing com-
mittee.
He estimated that 600 men will
rush this semester, about the same

Phone NO 8-9382.

)H20

REAL ESTATE

THE
BUTTS & SWISHER
REALTORS

CO .

- -Daily-David Arnold
LOSE SOMETHING?-Here is one month's accumulation of
scarves and gloves lost by students in the central campus area.
Caipus Lost and Found
Doing Booming Business

By RONALD PARK v
If there is one thing students
can do well, it's to lose things.
Not just gloves, scarves and
coats, but golf balls, checkbooks,
ping pong paddles, knitting yarn
and finger nail polish.
If these and other articles are
lost in the buildings of the cen-
tral campus, they soon end up
in the lost and found department
located at the Information Desk
on the second floor of the Ad-
ministration Building. The de-
partment is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday and from
8 a.m. to noon Saturdays.
Articles are Tagged
Here they are tagged as to date
turned in and the building in
which they were found. If the item
is a purse or billfold the owner
is immediately notified by phone.
Owners of other articles are;
notified by postcard if the articleI
has identification.
According to Grace Park and
Martha Lindenschmidt, employees
in charge of the Information
In Midwes
MILWAUKEE (I)-A new atomic
reactor plant that may produce
electric power more cheaply than3
conventional steam generation is
scheduled for construction in the
Midwest during the next five
years.
"This has the real, serious in- ;
tent of developing nuclear power
~until it is competitive with power
from fossil fuels," said Robert S.
Stevenson, president of the Allis-
Chalmers Mfg. Co., in a presenta-
tion to newsmen yesterday,
The plant will be built by Allis-'
Chalmers, a pioneer developer of'
working reactors. Research and
development will be underwritten
by an association of utility com-
panies in seven Midwestern states.
When finished in 1962, the plant
will be owned and operated by the
Northern States Power Co. Its
60,000-kilowatt capacity will be
fed into the connected lines of the
cooperating systems.
'UT' To Pr' ese~t
Movies on Trvel
For the second year, the Uni-
versity Oratorical Association will
present a series of Burton Holmes
Travelogues in Hill Auditorium,
opening Feb. 28 and running every
T h u r s d a y thereafter through
March 28.
"Cruise to Rio" will be the first
picture. Others are "Kingdom of
Sweden," March 7; "Today's Ja-
pan," March 14; "Charm of the
South," March 21 and "Sunny
Portugal," March 28.
All showtings wrill be at 8:30 p.m.j,

Desk, most students respond tof
the postcards in about a week.
However, many of the articles
contain no identification. These
articles are held two months and
books without names are held one
month.
Only 1/3 Claimed
Only about one third of the
articles lacking identification are
claimed. On the other hand, half
of the persons inquiring at the
desk for lost items find they have
not been turned in.
Freshmen seem to have the
most difficulty in holding onto
their possessions, especially dur-
ing the registration period. The
first thing they lose is their ID
cards. They then cannot get their
football tickets, a prospect not
especially appealing to them.
A sudden change in the weath-
er, from warm to cold brings a
flood of lost clothing such as
jackets and coats.
"Right now we are doing a
booming business in scarves, gloves
and headgear," Miss Park com-
mented.
Few Faculty Owners
Few items turned in are owned
by the faculty. Either they don't
lose many items or they don't put
their names on them.
Any person who finds and turns
in a lost article can claim it if
the owner fails to call for the ar-
ticle within two months.
Other items students lose are
pipes, tobacco pouches, jewelry,
gym shorts, bermuda shorts, lip-
stick, ice skates, and nurse caps.
A rainy spell turns up a number
of rain coats and umbrellas.
Text books and notebooks are
lost in a steady flow all during
the school year. Some of the lost
notebooks invariably contain a
term paper or similar items of
importance.
What is thefmost often lost
textbook? The freshman English
handbook, of course.
s

FOR ANN ARBOR WOODS
(Washtenaw at Stadium)
Models Open Daily 10-8
Phone NO 3-0800 )R-
PERSONAL
We NEVER close - magazine subecrip-
tbons at discount rates.
Student Periodical, NO 2-3061
)F127
ROOMMATE WANTED to share mod-
ern, furnished 3-room apartment
with two girls. Close to campus. NO
8-9690. )F131
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted, $18, or new silk
shawl collar, $25. Write to Michaels
Tailoring Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit,
Michigan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )Fi
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED -- Call NO 3-
2360. House Manager. )E9
BOARDERS WANTED - Good food,
reasonable rates. Call Brad Barr, NO
2-9431. )E10
BOARD at Nakamura Coop House, 807
So. State. 20 meals a week for $9.00 and
4% hours work. Contact Harley Ris-
tad, Pres., between 5-6. NO 2-3219.
)E11
TWO SPACES remain for women at
Friends Center. $250 and four hours
work weekly cover room and board.
Apply 1416 Hill St. or phone NO 2-
9890. )E8
GOOD ROOMS, good food, for upper-
classmen or grad. men. Mr. Wentz,
-1319 Hill, NO 2-6422. )E7
CARS FOR RENT

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LLNES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily,
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Assistant in nursery school.
M-W-F mornings. Call NO 2-6188.
)H81
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part-
time. Apply 113 V. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company.

BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED TYPIST in thesis, term
papers, etc. Work done on electric
typewriter. NO 2-7605. )J91
TEACHER of singing and speaking.
Mrs. Kenneth N, Westerman, NO 8-
6584. )J47
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
re-woven, Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade,
)J2
TYPEWRITER REPAIR & service, pick-
up and delivery. Moseley Typewriter
Service. 204 N. 4th Ave. NO 3-5888.
)J22
CHILD DAY CARE - Licensed home.
Northwest location. References. Cal
NO 2-0410. )J46
STUDENT MOTHERS - Morning care
for children nine months to twenty-
four months. Phone NO 8-7797. )J43
WASHINGS-Also ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and deli-
very. Phone NO 2-9020. )J23
Buy your typewriter
Rent your typewriter
And have your typewriter repaired
at a typewriter store.
314Soth MORRILL'S
314 South State NOrmandy 3-2481
)J42
USED CARS
1949 PLYMOUTH convertible, radio and
heater, completely summerized. $162.
Call NO 5-1367. )N89
USED CAR SPECIALS-1954 Chevrolet
fordor; radio and heater, powerglide
-a real nice car, $745.
1949 Ford V8 tudor, 1 owner, radio and
heater, good tires, $165.
1956 Ford tudor, 19,000 miles, real nice,
$1395.
JIM WHITE, INC.
Your Chevrolet Dealer
Open 'til 9 P.M. Daily-Sat. 'til 1 P.M.
2 Big Lots-Cor. Washington and First
Sts. and Cor. Ashley and Liberty Sts.
Phones:
NO 2-5000, NO 3-6495, NO 3-3321
)N90
LOST AND FOUND
LOST - Cordovan wallet in Union.
Identification cards needed., Call NO
5-6373. Reward offered. ) A86
LOST Wednesday-Alpha Delta Pi pin.
Reward. NO 2-2539. )A85
FOR RENT
WANTED-2 girls to share apt. near
campus. NO 3-2342. )C68
TWO ROOM SUITE for two male stu-
dents. Sleeping porch and study
room. $7 each per week. 1227 So.
State. NO 3-1650. )C67
LARGE 3 room apartment. One block
from campus. ALSO one man to
share apartment with three: same
location. Phone NO 2-1443. )C66
APARTMENT in exchange for child
care and dinner preparation. NO 2-
9665. )C65

SAM'S STORE
122 East Washington

)B205

9 x 12 COTTON RUGS
$29.95
Many varieties of colors to choose from
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERING
207 E Washington
NO 3-5536
Open Monday evening until 8:30
)B186
WASHINGTON & LINCOLN
Helped lead to good government,
good way of life. Let us help you
celebrate with our special cakes
and cookies.
CAMPBELL & SON BAKERY
219 N. Main
Call NO 8-9880 )B211
w
SEAHORSES and marine fish are in!
Fresh water tropicals, plants, aquar-
iums and supplies; hamsters, rag-
mops and monkeys.
University Aquarium
328 E. Liberty NO 3-0224
Open daily except Thursday
)B217
University Electrovoice, Viking,
Garrard and the best of the rest.
" "Build it yourself" Kits.
" "Installment Plan" to fit your needs.
" "Audiophile Net" or Catalog Prices
1317 So. University
NO 2-9595 )B194
33 PT. RIVER DIAMOND RING for
70% of value. References. R. . Tay-
lor, 12 N. Ingalls. )B216
DIAMOND RINGS-Complete selection
of wedding rings, bands, birth stone
rings and men's diamond rings. 55%
off. Direct from factory. We can not
be beat. Written guarantee. Money
refunded if not satisfied. At NO 2-
2684. }B191

FOR SALE
REFRIGERATOR: apt. size, good work-
ing condition, $40. Single Bed and
mattress; $10. NO 3-1416. )B212
CORTINA French record course. Used
very little. $45. Write Box 35-A, Mich-
igan Daily. }8215
REBUILT Raleigh English Bike. Mo-
torcycle, Australian-built model -
3 months old. Buying car. Write or
inquire 2016C Northwood Apts. }B208
H'i-Fl
Quality name brand speakers, ,
amplifiers, kits, turntables,
changers, tape recorders
Hours: Mon.-Fri: Noon-8 P.M.
Saturday: 9-1 P.M.
Audio Supply Lab. Showrooms
334 Nickels Arcade
(above Bay's Jewelry)
NO 2-7767 NO 2-9425
)B208
FOR SALE-Tuxedo and Navy officer
uniforms-41 long-very reasonable,
NO 2-9165, )B207
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords -- $7.25;
socks, 39e; shorts, 69c; military sup-
plies.

FOR SALE
BALDWI N PIANOS
Acrosonic Spinets
Used spinets and uprights
508 E William
NO 3-3223 )B210
ROOMS FOR RENT
SINGLE FOR MAN-campus location,
laundry facilities. Call NO 8-7253 aft-
er five. )D4
DOUBLE ROOM for men students.
Living room and kitchen privileges.
$7.50 each, including linens. Call NO
8-9402. )D4t
BASEMENT BEDROOM and sitting
room, for two. Fireplace, private en-
trance. Need car. NO 2-6008. )D44
CAMPUS ROOMS for men. Refrigerator
available. New beds. 1019 Church St.
Call NO 3-4257 or HU 2-7678, )D39
CLEAN SINGLE and double rooms for
men students near campus. Call NO
3-2242 after 4. )D43
? OF A DOUBLE ROOM for $6.50 a
week. Als oa double room, $6.50. Call
NO 8-9720. )x46
ROOMS for male students. ablock
from campus. One double and one
half double room available. 723 Oak-
land, NO 3-3792. )D45
SINGLE ROOM for male student. One
block from Law School. 808 Oakland.
NO 2-2858.. )D44
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORiES
For the Best in
Tires, Batteries, and Service
see
"HOB" GAINSLEY
SERVICE
So. University & Forest
)54,

1,

Read
Daily

C

lass ifieds

*

AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
long distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales, Inc., 514 E. Washington St.
NO 3-4156.

1

Held Over
through
Saturday

I AA I ' 1111 1
I Y'V!I III iM III

p a

DIAL
NO 2-3136

RODGERS'
AND
HAMMERSTEIN'S
LATE SHOW Comlte!
TONIGHT *
P.M. I N COLOR AN D
CINEMASCOPE

Starting 'hComing
SUNDAY SUNDAY
RESCUED
FROM HER eePRISON"

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| SHOWING FROM 1 :30 1
FROM AFRICAN JUNGLES .. .
TO CUBAN WATER-FRONTSI

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CLUWDE ooy g
~.e.icMERVYN LeROY
FRIDAY
"LIFE AND MUSIC OF
VERDI"

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Arranged by Project Michigan, number rushing at this time last
the University's classified govern- year.
ment study of the problems of ( Registration for rushing, now
battle area surveillance, the sym- in progress, will continue until
posium was jointly sponsored by Feb. 20 in Rm. 1020 Administra-
the Army, Navy and Air Force. j tion Bldg.
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
* ANC NG Sunday at 8 O only
Friday and Saturday Nights S
Freddie Bentz and the Rainbow ComboX
Don Baiey-- Your singing host r A. Ly7 I EI "'"1

j

1 1 starring ili rwu * u * mm1 1

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