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April 03, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-04-03

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3,.1.957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3,1957 THE MICHIGAN DAIIX

i' 1 lI
10-3

ISA Plans Three Tours for Spring Vacation

By JAN RAHM
Music and dancing of 11 coun-
tries will be presented on the show
tour which will visit Michigan
cities from Saturday to Sunday,
April 14.
The theme of the performance
is "Cafe International", a deserted
cafe which comes to life with the
imaginary reawakening of the
people who had entertained there
while the Cafe was operating.
Spanish f I a m e n c o dancers;
South American musicians, danc-
ers and singers; a Japanese fan
dancer; Arabian and Indian in-
strumentalists and vocalists; a
Hawaiian hula dancer and Ger-
man and Ukrainian folk dancers
will perform.
Wear Native Dress
All 23 participants will wear na-
tive dress and the instruments
used will be authentic.
Ganay Actay will be master of
ceremonies.
William West, assistant counse-
lor at the International Center
commented that the show was
lively and with a varied tempo.
"Although this is the first time
the group has ever worked togeth-
er, the rehearsals have been going
along fine," West commented.
Meet Other Foreign Students
"The performers," West said,
"have enjoyed the opportunity to
get to know students from other
countries working in their show."
The tour is free for the perform-
ers with the University providing
bus transportation and local
alumni clubs and civic organiza-
tions sponsoring home hospitality.
West reported that "the students
are enthused about staying in Am-
THETA SIGMA PHI JOB

Coeds' Engagements Announced by Parents
The engagement of Nancy Jean
Dreibelbies to Carlton Gordon Rei
ley was announced recently by heri
parents, Colonel and Mrs. Adam J
Dreibelbies of Nashville, Tennessee
Mr. Reiley's parents are Mr. and
Mrs. Harry A. Reiley of Bellaire,
Michigan.
Miss Dreibelbies is a senior in
the School of Nursing. Her fiance
is a senior in Medical School and
is a member of Phi Chi profes-
sional medical fraternity.
A June wedding is planned. I

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Bradley of
Grosse Pointe, Michigan, recently
announced the engagement of Mr.
Bradley's daughter, Susan Hallett,
to John T. Scovill, son of Mr. and
Mrs. John R. Scovill of Pearl River,
New York.
Miss Hallett is a junior in the
literary college and is a member
of Gamma Phi Beta.
Mr. Scovill is a senior in the
College of Engineering and is affil-
iated with Chi Phi fraternity.
The couple plan to be married
August 31 in Grosse Pointe.
Announcement of the engage-
ment and approaching marriage of
Martha Ann Young to Gilbert Bur-
ton Rodger was made recently by
her mother, Mrs. M. R. Young
of Royal Oak.
Mr. Rodger's parents are Mr.
and Mrs. C. B. Rodger of San
Clemente, California.
Miss Young is a senior in the
School of Education and is affili-
ated with Alpha Delta Pi.
Mr. Rodger is a senior in the

NANCY JEAN DREIBELBIES
School of Business Administration
and is a member of Chi Phi.
The couple plan to be married
June 28.

SUSAN HALLETT MARTHA ANN YOUNG

BROWSING-

I

dcn'44 Camnpo

I

-Daily-David Arnold
NATIVE COSTUME-Recently seen at the International Center were students from Latvia, Japan
and Pakistan dressed in native costume.

GOLF CLUB - The Golf Club
will meet at 5:10 today at the
Women's Athletic Building.
* * *
ALICE CROCKER AWARD-At
Installation Night the Alice Crock-
er Lloyd scholarship award was
given to Elizabeth Graff, Phyllis
Luce, Kathy Rudnicki, Judy Tend-
ler and Carol Toth.

I

Bob Marhl'

I

erican homes and learning more
about American life."
Cities to Greet Students
Performances will be given at
Midland, Port Huron, Alpena, Pe-
toskey, Cadillac, Reed City, Man-
istee and Greenville. James M.
Davis, director of the Center, West
and Mary McKay, student co-

ordinator will accompany the tour.
Tentative plans are being made
to present the show for campus
audience on Friday, April 26.
Two other tours are planned fpr
next week.
Chicago Sight-Seeing Tour
A sight-seeing tour of Chicago
will last from Wednesday to Sun-
day, April 10 to 14. The group will

PANEL:

Journalists Describe

Career

to Students

By ROSE PERLBERG
If a woman is thinking of a
career in journalism, neophytes
and veterans to the profession
warn her not to be discouraged
when things seem unpromising at
the beginning.
She has to "plug along" and,
unless she "gets a lucky break,"
often must work her way up from
the bottom, women representing
c o m m u n it y and metropolitan
newspapers recently told a group
of journalism majors. '
They were part of a jobs panel
sponsored by Theta Sigma Phi,
national professional fraternity
for women in journalism, to give
graduates an idea of what kind
of jobs they can expect upon en-
tering different branches of jour-
nalism.
Four Panelists
The panel included Myra Mc-
Pherson from the Detroit Free,
Press Radio and Television De-
partment; Anne Kyker from one
of a chain of weeklies in the North-
west section of Detroit; Peg Cully,
journalism teacher in a Detroit
public school; and Alice Beeman,
editor of special publications in
the University's Public Relations
Department. Miss Cully acted as
moderator.
Miss McPherson, who graduated
last June from Michigan State
University, puts her job in the
"lucky break" class. Although she's
not doing too much writing now-
her work as assistant to the Free
Press Radio and TV editor consists
of scheduling programs-she says
that she has a good foothold to-
ward advancing into a writing
position.
She writes a few features, her
major field of interest, but more
important is the Free Press style
training she is getting. Had she
first worked a few years on a
smaller paper, Miss McPherson ex-
plains, and then transferred to the
metropolitan Free Press, she might
still have had to work her way up
from the bottom. Now, within a
few years, she feels confident that
CANOE TRIPS
Total cost $5.75 per diem for v
thrilling vacation in the Quetico-
Superior wikrerness.j
For information write.
CANOE COUNTRY OUTFITTERS
Bill Rom, Box 717 C, Ely, Minn.
tk- _ _ _

{"

see "The Desk Set," starring Shir-
ley Booth and attend a concert by
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
In addition, they will visit such
customary tourist attractions as
the Museum of Science and the
Chicago Art Institute.
Barbara Snoek, office manager
of the Center and director of the
tour, reported that the group has
a flexible schedule so that the 23
members will be able to visit the
places that are of special interest
to them.
Visiting industries, schools,
homes'and farms in four Michigan
cities from Wednesday, April to
Sunday, April 12 is the itinerary,
for the friendship tour.
Tour Industries
Special places'to be visited are
Western Michigan University's de-
partment of paper technology and
Upjohn Pharmaceutical Co. in
Kalamazoo and Gilbert Chocolate
Co. and Goodyear Tire and Rub-
ber Co. in Jackson.
Tour members will speak at Ro-
tary Club luncheons in Kalama-
zoo, Coopersville and Muskegon.
Russell Hanson, assistant coun-
selor at the Center, is in charge
of the tour. Applicants are still
being accepted.

she will be devoting most of her
time to writing.
Small Town Paper
Presenting another side, Miss
Kyker admits that the weekly's
removal of hectic daily deadlines
"takes some pressure off." She
adds that when papers like hers
are printed by an independent
shop, a new kind of deadline har-
ries the staff.
Evert though the paper comes
out weekly, you still "work like a
dog," Miss Kyker laughs. But, she
continues, the variety of things
you cover, "everything from so-
ciety through city beats," makes
the experience "invaluable."
Both metropolitan and small
town papers "keep you at ahectic
pace," representatiyes declare,
mainly because they're under-
staffed. Both women consider work
days until 9 p.m. "a regular occur-
rence."

cations, news bulletins covering
faculty alumni, information, and
reports to high schools, parents of
University students, or prospective
studlents; 3) Field Services, ar-
rangement of University band or
Glee Club tours and 4) the Ad-
ministration Building guide serv-
ice.
Radio and Television jobs are
handed through the University's
own networks. Miss Be'eman also
remarked that editorial jobs in the
various graduate school research
departments are open to prospec-
tive journalists.

FOR AN EXCEPTIONAL TOUR INCLUDING
MANY UNUSUAL FEATURES
Join a university group for a
EUROPEA HOLIDAY
ENGLAND, FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, ITALY,
AUSTRIA, GERMANY, HOLLAND
Opera in Rome Dine at world famed
Follies in Paris restaurants
Theatre in London Dance at old
Festival in Salzburg Heidelberg
FIRST CLASS HOTELS WITH BATH
Sail from Montreal July 9 on new Empress of
Britain; Return Empress of Scotland, Aug. 20
A few spaces still available
$129500
hBoersma Travel Service
Phone NO 3-8597; NO .3-1813: NO 2-4673

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Union Plans Theater Trip, Travel Aid

Teaching Advantages
Good hours, says Teacher Cully,
are one of the main attractions
to her profession. Miss Cully points
out that she works a full day
and "still gets home before my
children." And, she smiles, teach-
ing is a "good insurance policy; at
least you know you're going to eat
regularly."
She cites a need for teachers in
specialized fields like journalism,
and remarks that she "works with
the top students in the school."
A different type of journalism is
offered prospective career women
in public relations. Special Editor
Beeman discussed the combination
of education and public relations,
'I' Public Relations
She outlined the University's
public relations services as 1) news
and information; 2) special publi-
STEVE'S

With spring vacation approach-
ing, the Union is planning theater
trips, announcing the results of
their bridge tournament and of-
fering a transportation bureau.
Damn Yankee
Tickets go on sale today for a
Union sponsored trip to Detroit on
Tuesday, April 23 to see "Damn
Yankee". Tickets may be pur-
chased between 3 and 5 p.m. in
the Union Student Offices. On the
evening of the performance the
bus will leave at 6:30 p.m. from
behind the Administration Bldg.
Bridge Tournament Results
Howard Ringel and Robert Se-
gar placed fifth in the Inter-Col-
legiate Bridge Tournament, Mrs.
Walter McLean, local tournament
director, announced today.
Ringel and Segar competed as a
team against nearly 2,000 bridge
enthusiasts. A total of 103 colleges
and universities were entered in
the final series.
Mrs. McLean added that Ringel
and Segar took first place in zone

6 - Indiana, Illinois, Michigan,
and Wisconsin.
John Penquit and Clifton Fay,
another University team, placed
tenth in the final tournament and
third in the zone finals.
Transportation Bureau
Students desiring a ride or pas-
sengers to a certain destination
may submit their names in the
appropriately marked box in the
Union lobby.
PARTY FAVORS
for
ALL OCCASIONS
Ball Office Supply
213 E. Washington Ph. 3-1161

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