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March 29, 1957 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-29

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N

MTDAX, MARCH' 29, 1957

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

Y

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 19~7 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

ANN ARBOR ELECTIONS:
Candidates Seek City Mayor Position
By JAMES ELSMAN - .r:"; T.p.1.ri":4 . rlibSH ' ' MI K': KM M3;I , .{t';5

City To Vote

PLUS LOCAL ISSUES:
City To Take Part in State Elections

At 17

Polls

Ann Arbor's Charter provides
for a mayor who is the "presiding
officer of the Council," has a vote
and a powerful veto only to be
over-ruled by 8 of the body's 10
councilmen, and who appoints "all
Council Committees."
On April 1, incumbent Republi-
can Mayor William Brown, Demo-
cratic hopeful Prof. Samuel Elder-
sveld of the political science de-
partment, and write-in candidate
Dominic K. DeVarti will seek that
office.
MAYOR BROWN has weathered
successfully six previous mayoralty
elections, which have awarded him
12 consecutive years as Ann Arbor's
top politician His plurality has
always exceeded 10 per cent.
His wife, four children and the
Mayor himself are all University
graduates (as was his father).
Mayor Brown, '18, is a business-
man of considerable extent. He
owns Ann Arbor Agency, Univer-
sity Motor Sales, Huron Accep-
tance, Washington Investment,
and Huron Motor Sales. He put
the first dollar into Argus Camera
which was recently merged with
Sylvania Corp.
The Mayor believes no one else
but a businessman should be
Mayor. He compares his position
to that of a corporation president
and the Council's to the board of
directors.
The World War I veteran says
Council Hopes
City voters will elect ten City
Council members to two year
terms. The Council consists of
ten members in addition to the
Mayor, two from each of Ann
Arbor's five wards. Following is
a list of Council candidates.
Ward I-Democrats Richard
Dennard and M. Alicia Dwyer;
Republicans David G. Dickinson
and Robert J. Wollam.
Ward II-Robert L. Hunter
and Ralph Carr Fletcher (Dem-
ocratic); Florence R. Crane and
Clan Crawford Jr. (Republi-
can).
Ward IIi-James T. Heckman
and Arthur E. Carpenter and
Republicans Charles W. Joiner
and Frank Davis.
Ward IV-Democrats Louis
W. Lewis and Arnold W. Tam-
men; Republicans Ronald E.
Kinterman and George A. Keeb-
ler.
Ward V -- Democrats Neil
Bloomfield and. Wayne P.
Smith;rRepublicans Carl A.
Brauer Jr. and Russell T. Burns.

Ont Monday
Ann Arbor citizens will go to
the polls Monday.
Seventeen precinct voting sta-
tions distributed through the
City's five wards will be open from
7 a.m. to 8 p.m. to register votes
on the City's voting machines.
The precincts are required by
state law, which states that citi-
zens must vote in precincts of not
more than 1,400 registered voters.
Each voting station is manned
by four or six election inspectors,
half Democrats and half Republi-
cans.
At the end of the voting day
machines are tabulated and results
recorded on a statement of votes
sheet which is the official tally.
The tabulations are phoned to
City Clerk Fred Looker's office
where an unofficial count is made.
The count is not official until the
Board of Canvassers checks the
ballots.
Under the City Charter, Ann
Arbor is divided into five wards,
each of which elects two council-
men to the City Council.

Ann Arbor citizens will parti-
cipate in state-wide elections in
addition to voting on local issues,
which include proposals for a city
owned and operated transporta-
tion system and the annexation of
land from Pittsfield Village.
There are seven positions open
on various levels on the statewide
ballot, including the election Uni-
versity Regent posts and State Su-
preme Court seats.
Contesting for two University
Regent posts are Democrats Carl
Brablee and Irene E. Murphy and
Republicans Alfred B. Connable
and Ethel Jocelyn Watt.
Democrat Lynn M. Bartlett will
compete with Republican Edgar
L. Harden for Superintendent of
Public Instruction.
Chris H. Magnusson is running
on the Democratic ticket for the
one available membership on the
State Board of Education. His op-
ponent is Republican Frank Merri-
man.
Two Democrats, Don Stevens and
Jan B. Vanderploeg will run for
two open memberships on the
State Board of Agriculture. Frank
Merriman and Frederick H. Muel-
ler are running for the same post
on the Republican ticket.

John C. Mackie, Democrat, is vy-
ing for the job of State Highway
Commissioner against Republican
candidate George M. Foster.
On a non-partisan ballot Robert
E. Childs, Thomas M. Kavanagh'
and Michael D. O'Hara are seeking
election to two Supreme Court po-
sitions against incumbent Talbot
Smith.
Contesting for a Court vacancy,
which will expire in December,+
1959, are Joseph A. Moynihan and
John D. Voelker.
A proposal to raise the legal
limitation on Washtenaw County
property taxes by one-half mill on
each dollar of the assessed valua-
tion will be considered by Wash-
tenaw County voters only. Proceeds
of the increased levy would be used
to assist the financing of an addi-
tion to the Washtenaw County
Jail.

if they want the city to own and
operate a public transportation
system. In addition it asks the
voters to decide whether or not to
increase the limit on real and
personal property taxes by one-
fourth mill.
The increased funds would be
used to defray operating expenses
of the system.
The other ballot directly con-
cerned with the proposed city
transportation system will ask citi-
zens to vote yes or no on a pro-
posal which would entitle the city
to borrow up to $150,000 and issue
its general obligation bonds on
the sum for the purpose of acquir-
ing buses, a garage and other
equipment.
Final ballot given to voters will
ask them to consider the annexa-
tion of certain land from Pitts-
field Village to the City of Ana

BROWN
. . Republican Incumbent

ELDERSVELD DEVARTI
... Democratic Candidate .. . Write-in Aspirant

his record is his platform. First,
the Mayor has been "amused and
alarmed" of late by statements of
his opponents as they define the
office of mayor. He praised the
Council and remarked "no one
man does it alone."
What has he done? The Mayor
commented the City has "the
finest water and sewerage system
in the State, and it has been con-
firmed recently by the State Board
of Health."
He intends to "keep traffic and
parking up to date," possibly re-
duce taxes and "take other things
as they come up."
The Mayor thinks the City
would well afford to pay a full-
time mayor.
* * *
PROF. ELDERSVELD is also a
University graduate and a life-
long Michigan resident. He has two
children. The Navy called him
from 1942-46. In 1954 he was a
Fulbright teacher at the University
of Amsterdam.
The Democratic platform which
the political science professor
stands behind declares it is "time
for a change" from the "obviously
poorly planned and inadequate
leadership" of the Republican
party.
Prof. Eldersveld has promised to
"establish a Human Relations
Commission" which would "ex-
plore, investigate, hold public hear-
ings and negotiate questions of
discrimination in any form."
Fair Employment Practices
He wants to establish fair em-
ployment practices in the City.
The Democrats, led by Prof. El-
dersveld, favor a "workable" Urban
Renewal Program which respects

"the interests, desires, and prob-
lems of the residents of the area."
He thinks the Police and Fire
departments can be unified into a
Department of Public Safety "with
resulting improved efficiency and
economy."
A long-range "practical working
plan for capital improvements,"
Prof. Eldersveld holds, is a neces-
sity for a fast-growing city.
His party is making no promises
to reduce taxes.

which would be beneficial to the
City should be set up." He listed a
Human Relations Commission as
such a one.
DeVarti has a plan whereby re-
lations could be improved between
the Police Department and local
motorists.
He advocates "re-evaluation" of
the present tax structure. He
wishes more "equitable assessment"
between City and county taxes.
To "maintain contact with the
people," DeVarti has drafted a
plan whereby non-partisan voter
leagues could advise the City gov-
ernment.
Coller To Lecture

I

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