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March 29, 1957 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-29

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FRTDA4, MARCH 29,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA GIN SE'VE'N

FRIDAY. MARC!! 29.1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVE~?

WWAWt

Myers

Wins

1500-

Meter in

National Swim

Meet

cede from the
SIDSELINES
by Dick Cramer
Who Plays Michigan ?
1T'S NO accident that Michigan's annual sports schedules include
a wide variety of opponents.
A school with as great and as honorable a sports reputation as
Michigan has no trouble finding a vast number of other schools
eager to meet its teams in athletics.
Our Athletic Department doesn't usually have to look for oppo-
sition. But its job is still sometimes formidable when it must choose
rom the many schools who want to play us. Actually, the individual
coaches do their own scheduling - and they have a lot of latitude
in making decisions - but they are supposed to base their choices on
how well prospective foes satisfy certain unwritten policy require-
ments:
1. Basic Big Ten membership responsibilities must be met.
2. No athletic contest may be scheduled that will cause the
use of any Michigan player to be curtailed; nor may a player be
subjected to any discrimination.
3. Michigan's participation in sports events should be for the
primary purpose of developing both individual and team capabili-
ties .
4. The interests of non-participating students and alumni
should be considered in any scheduling program.
Football is the main concern of the first stipulation. The Confer-
esice has confined its scheduling authority mainly to this sport. It
has ruled that only nine regular-season games may be played and at
least six of these must be within the Big Ten. Moreover, every school
is guaranteed at least two home Conference tilts.
WTITH ITS large number of traditional rivals, Michigan has felt
* obligated in recent years to play seven Conference games in order
to do its share in providing other schools with enough opponents.
This leaves only two openings on the slate. And much delibera-
tion often precedes their being filled. A main consideration here is
the many alumni in far-flung ci-
ties that long to see their college
football team play.
Athletic Director H. O. "Fritz"
Crisler has expressed a partiality
to home-and-home series with
both Eastern' and Far Western
The games with teams from the
West Coast have been a reality
nearly annually in recent years -
with Washington, UCLA and
Southern California.
But there has been some diffi-
culty in getting home-and-home
L w' agreements with Eastern schools.
The Ivy League has withdrawn
MICHIGAN STADIUM pretty much to itself and Army-
who gets to play here a big rival of Michigan switched
its game to Ann Arbor the last
time the Wolverines were scheduled to play in New York in
Yankee Stadium.
When the East and West do not satisfactorily complete Michigan's
schedule, we turn to other areas.
A team like Georgia is scheduled, but only under that second
policy stipulation - with the agreement that Michigan players may
be used and will not suffer discrimination.
1 Until some Southern citizens and politicians curb their prejudice,
our football games with Southern foes will all be played in Ann
Arbor. This is the only way we can assure ourselves that our Negro
athletes are not inconvenienced in housing and in general treatment
when away from home.
Fortunately, Michigan's baseball team has been able to have its
traditional Southern tour without any prejudice problems. This is
probably because baseball isn't as big news on the college level. The
press doesn't make such an issue of interracial baseball over most of
the South and intolerance isn't fanned.
The third scheduling guide applies most directly to our basket-
ball and track teams. It explains why Michigan has often shied away
from early-season basketball tournaments that seem to be quite the
s fad nowadays.
Of Questionable Value .. .
THESE TOURNAMENTS, with their game-per-day schedules, dons
x serve the function that early season games are supposed to do. They
don't give the team time to profit from one game's experience before
the next one comes along.
Michigan's absence from New York's Madison Square Garden
invitational track meets is also explained by the third stipulation.
These meets single out only the stars. The aim of developing teams-
served at such other meets as the Penn Relays where a large contin-
gent can be taken - is neglected in these invitational meets.
That final point of policy - satisfying students and alumni -
has been obviously adhered to, at least as far as the students are
concerned. While New York alumni may see less of their alma mater's
representatives than they might like, we in Ann Arbor have thor-
oughly enjoyed our large share of home athletic events against in-
teresting opponents from the Ivy League's Yale (in basketball) and
the West Coast's UCLA (in football) to Canada's Etobocoke Swim

Club and our great Big Ten rivals.

Yale Leads Michigan, 9-7;
Fries CapturesSixthPlace
A1

Sigma Chi, Phi Delta Theta Share I-M
Social Fraternity Indoor Track Title

Special to The Daily
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.-Fritz My-
ers got the Michigan swimming
contingent off to a good start in
its bid for the NCAA title by cap-
turing the 1500-meter event last
night.
Also swimming an exceptionally
fine race was Pete Fries who
gained a sixth place for the Wol-
verines.
Final Appearance
Myers, who is making his final
appearance for the Maize and
Blue in this meet, trailed Yale's

Raymond Ellison for over half
the race.
But at the 30-length mark,
Myers began to close the gap, fin-
ally succeeding by the 44-length
mark. Ellison spurted ahead once
more six lengths later, but the
Michigan senior kept pressing him.
Close Finish
Myers caught the Yale swimmer
once again at the 62-length mark
and from this point it was a race
to the wire with Myers finishing
ahead in 19:04.8.
Ellison was checked in at 10:09.5.
Another Yale swimmer finished
third, and this 2-3 finish gave the
Bulldogs a 9-7 edge over second-
place Michigan at the end of the
first day of the meet.
"In There Digging"
Myers commented immediately
after the race that "down the wire
I couldn't remember what hap-
pened. All I know is that my arms
were in there digging."
His time tied a pool record at
North Carolina which was set in
last year's finals.
With this excellent moral as well
as physical start, the Wolverines
now stand a better chance than
ever of upsetting the pre-tourney
favorite, Yale.
Job Well Done
1500-METER EVENT: 1 Myers
(M) 19:04:8; 2 Ellison (Yale)
19:09.5; 3 Robinson (Yale) 19.32.5;
4 Johnson (Texas) 19:33.6; 5 Bell-
she (Denver) 19:42.4; 6 Fries (M)
19:52.1.

By DAVE LYON
Terry Miller took a first in the
high jump and a second in the
60-yd. dash to help Phi Delta
Theta tie Sigma Chi for first place
honors in the I-M social fraternity
track meet last night.
Both squads showed strength
and depth in piling up 15 points
each. Phi Delta Theta scored,
points in six of the nine events
and Sigma Chi placed in five.'
Alpha Tau Omega finished third
with 13.
Maentz Edged
In the final event, Theta Xi

pole-vaulter Ken Fowler prevent-
ed Sigma Chi from winning out-
right when he cleared 11'4" to edge
Sigma Chi's Tom Maentz. As much
as a first-place tie in the pole
Gymnast Hurt
Jim Hayslett, an outstanding
sophomore star on the gym
squad, suffered what appeared
to be a dislocated forearm dur-
ing the social fraternity I-M
track championships last night.

vault for Maentz would have
meant victory for Sigma Chi.
Miller scraped across the high-
jump bar at 5'9" and finished a
close second to ATO's Charles
Gunn in the 60-yd. dash to account
for more than half of Phi Delta
Theta's points. Gunn ran the
course in :6.7.
Other winners included Terry
Barr, :56.7 in the quarter-mile;
Leigh Corby, :09. in the 65-yard
high hurdles; Bill Green, 40'5" in
the shot put; and Dick Friedmar,
19'7%" in the broad jump.

I-M WINNER - Leigh Corby of
Beta Theta Pi strains in his
winning effort in the 65-yd. high
hurdles of the social fraternity
meet last night.

I U

PRO FRATERNITY:
IJSD Wains Swim Meet

Not everyone con have one!

The water was just right in the
I-M pool last night for Delta Sig-
ma Delta to win the professional
fraternity swimming meet.
The Delta Sigma Delta's
splashed past last year's winners,
Nu Sigma Nu, 24-18 , after the
latter got off to a good start.
Nu Sigma Nu won the 200-yd.
freestyle relay and their man Bur-
well "Bumpy" Jones won the 200-
yd. freestyle. Jones also came in
a close second in the 50-yd. breast
stroke.
The Delta Sigma Delta men won

the 50-yd. breast stroke and the
100-yd. freestyle. Mike Delaney
and Jack Beattie took the honors.
The 150-yd. medley team of Jim
Oosting, Delaney, and Bob Knox
copped another first for the Del-
tas.
The new diving event proved to
be the most interesting and by
far the most humorous of the eve-
ning. The best diver was Jones of
Delta Sigma Delta. His 113.1
points almost doubled that of his
nearest rival.

The MICHIGANENSIAN Record
Only 75c with your 'ENSIAN
Subscription

" the supply

is limited 9

ai

FRITZ MYERS
. 1500-meter champ

RANGERS WIN, 4-3:
Wings Rout Bruins,

7-2

41

DETROIT OP)-The Detroit Red
Wings squared their Stanley Cup
hockey series last night with Bos-
ton at one game apiece, battering
the Bruins, 7-2, in a viciously
played contest in which 22 penal-
ties were called.
Aroused by the stinging criti-
cism that followed~ their loss Tues-
day night ani by the first period
injury to their goalie Glenn Hall,
the Red Wings skated furiously
in their most aggressive play of
the season.
Howe Top Scorer
Gordie Howe, the National Hock-
ey League's leading scorer, scored
one goal and assisted on two oth-
ers as the Wings rammed shot af-
ter shot past rookie goalie Don

Simmons who had held them to
one goal in the opener.
With Hall-despite a first per-
iod -ut across his upper lip that
required 18 stitches to close-
turning back one Bruin rush af-
ter another' with catlike move-
ments in the net, the Detroit club
beat Boston at its own hard-charg-
ing style of play.
* * *
Rangers Win
NEW YORK (A)-In the other
NHL playoff at New York, Andy
Hebenton's dramatic goal at 13:88
of a sudden death overtime period
gave the New York Rangers a 4-3
victory over the Montreal Cana-
diens to even their series at one
game apiece.

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