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March 28, 1957 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-28

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THURSDAY, MARCH 28,195'

ral RA
ME MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMIM

THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1957 iliE MIChIGAN DAILY PAGE TflILU

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the 9P-e dle...
WITH DAVE GREY
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H. o. Crisler
IF YOU WERE introduced to him and did not know of him, you might
venture a guess that he was a business executive or, maybe, even the
president of some organization.
You would be impressed by his distinguished, reserved manner,
with a natural smile and a strong handshake. His firm, direct glance
and smooth, deep speaking voice might remind you of a person well
trained in public speaking. His solid build for a man in his late fifties
would make you estimate that at one time he was an athlete.
And you would be right. Michigan Athletic Director Herbert Orin
"Fritz" Crisler is all of these things, and in many respects a lot more.
He is a man of power, influence, drive' and distinction. H. O.;
Crisler not only leads the Michigan athletic family and carries on
the Michigan athletic tradition that we have so often heard about,
but also he is a leader on the national intercollegiate athletic level.
lie is a man with ideas and one with a "genius" in his particular
profession to get things done, and done well. ,
A man in Crisler's position naturally tends to fall into a category
of being known by many but known well by only a few. His job and
his philosophies are sometimes a matter of controversy, but no one in
fairness can argue that Crisler
has not contributed an enormous
amount to Michigan.
He has already left a person- _
alized mark that will carry over
long after the University hasobeitenlmn.
doubled its enrollment.
The late famed Dean of Ameri-
can Sportswriters, Grantland Rice,
tells a football story about his
friend Crisler in his autobiography
"The Tumult and the Shouting."4
It goes back to 1939 when Tom
Harmon was at Michigan under
head coach Crisler. Michigan's still -v
new mentor made the chance
statement a while before the Illi-
nois game that he thought Har-
mon was better than "Red"
Grange, the greatest of all the
Illini.
The reaction in Champaign was>
earthshattering. By game time the
Fighting Illini were at a psycho-
logical point of grim determina-
tion to stop Harmon. They did
upset Michigan, 16-7, in what Rice FRITZ CRISLER
describes as, probably, one of Cris- few mistakes
ler's few mistakes.
The name of Crisler, his incorporation of the two-platoon system,
his single wing offense with buck lateral and fullback spinner varia-
tions, would be enough alone to rank him as one of football history's
outstanding figures. But this part of his story needs a little back-
tracking in time.
Born in Earlville, Ill., on Jan. 12, 1899, Crisler was destined to
pecome one of the University of Chicago's greatest athletes back in
the days when that institution was an athletic power. He won nine
letters in football, basketball and track, plus maintaining a solid B
average and participating in other campus activities.
Carry On ..
UPON GRADUATION in 1922, he stayed at Chicago under Amos
Alonzo Stagg until 1930. He then moved on for head coaching jobs
at Minnesota and Princeton before finally settling in Ann Arbor in
1938. In 1941, Crisler took over the duties of athletic director from
Fielding Yost. The Michigan tradition was to carry on.
Crisler coached the Wolverines for 10 seasons, during which time
his teams never finished below fourth place in the Western Conference.
He guided Michigan to two championships, plus being named "Coach
of the Year" in his last season, 1947. (Present head coach Bennie
Oosterbaan was awarded the same honor the following year.) Crisler's
lifetime record with Minnesota, Princeton and Michigan was 116 wins,
32 losses and nine ties.
The second phase of the Crisler story deals with his now nearly 16
years as an administrator. His record of physical improvement for
the University now offers an outstanding athletic plant. His first love
of football has brought most of the funds for the vast development
from gate receipts. All the building funds have come from within the
athletic department.
At the same time, he has, fought to keep unearned aid to athletes
at a minimum. He has sought a program for the Big Ten of no
approaching high school athletes. In many respects, his philosophies,
and, therefore, the ideals of the University, stand a little apart from
most of the other Big Ten institutions.
Crisler's philosophies for the future see more emphasis on the
intramural program with an attempt to meet the growing needs of
the University. In many respects, this can be a main rationalization!
for the large scale program of athletics here. Plans are constantly being
made toward the future, for new improvements.
So briefly you have been exposed to part of the story of "Fritz"
Crisler, a "man in the know." And I think that Michigan knows that
it is fortunate to have him.

Swim Meet
Opening Set
For Tonight
Special to The Daily
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.-Not since
1948 has a Michigan swimming
team won the NCAA title.
However, the Wolverines are
given a good chance to capture
the 1957 crown in the champion-
ships that start here tonight.
Yale is rated as the pre-meet
choice for top honors, but should
be hard-pressed by both Michigan
State and Michigan, Any one of
the three could take top honors.
Today's action will be limited to
just one event, the 1500-meter
freestyle. The natators will enter
two men in this event, Fritz Myers
and Pete Fries.
Myers finished third in the Big
Ten, while Fries was a surprising
fifth. Big Ten champion Gerry'
McNamee from Ohio State will not
compete as the Buckeyes are ineli-
gible.
Michigan's chances to take top
honors will depend to a large ex-
tent on the performances of the
amazing sophomore duo of Cy
Hopkins and Dick Hanley, and a
quartet of divers.
Hopkins will probably be the fa-
vorite to cop both the 100 and
200-yard breaststroke. His biggest
competition should come from two
other Big Ten swimmers, Paul
Reinke of Michigan State and
Barry Yap of Indiana.
Coach Gus Stager will use Hop-"
kins in one other event, either the
medley relay or the butterfly. If
he swims the latter, he will have
to beat out the East's top swim-
mer, Tim Jecko of Yale, who re-
cently set a world's record in the
butterfly.
Hanley is entered in four events,
but according to NCAA rules can
compete in only three. Almost def-
initely he will go in the 220 yard
freestyle, an event he set a world's
mark in at the Big Ten meet.
If Stager elects to go for the
medley relay, Hanley will probably
swim the anchor leg. In addition
he will either swim in the 100 or
440 yard freestyle.
Dick Kimball, Michigan's top
diver, is rated an excellent chance
to win the three-meter diving, and
captain John Narcy, John Murphy
and Ed Cole round out a strong
Michigan diving contingent.

Crowns
W restlers
Start Action
Tomorrow
By PETE MARUDAS

BOB MARSHALL'S

has the Books
has the Bargains

!e
it

m

BRIEF AT THE KNEE

JOHN NARCY MIKE RODRIGUEZ
.'M' diving threat . .. stiff competition ahead
Gomberg Captures -M
*1 Pr

iestaence i
By FRED KATZ
As true to form as the New York
Yankees, Gomberg, the perennial
champ of Michigan's residence
halls, successfully defended its in-
door track title last night at Yost
Field House.
Point totals were closely bunch-
ed, with Gomberg's 19 leading the
field. Van Tyne claimed the run-
ner-up spot with 12, followed by
Hayden's 10. Hayden made the
greatest jump in the final stand-
ings from last year, when it failed
to enter a squad.
Gomberg gained its title pri-
marily through its depth, captur-
ing only one first. That cham-
pionship was garnered by miler
Pete Marudas, the only success-
ful defending champ. Marudas
knocked 4.5' seconds off his last
year's time by finishing his special-
ty in 5:01.9. Marudas holds the
residence hall record in that event.
Jim Foley of Hayden became the
meet's most prolific scorer by tak-
ing first. in the 65-yard high
hurdles with a time of :08.9, and
BASEBALL SCORES
Cleveland 6, Chicago (N) 0
New York (N) 5, Boston 2
Milwaukee 12, Cincinnati 6
St. Louis 1, New York (A) 0
Philadelphia 1, Kansas City 0
Chicago (A) 9, Washington 4
Detroit 18, Brooklyn 1

race miet
another championship in the high
jump. His leap of 5'10" tied the
record set by Milt Mead in 1950.
Foley, scoring all his team's
points, single-handedly led Hay-
den to third place.
Farris Wins High Jump
Other men doing yeoman's du-
ties were Lovell Farris of Win-
chell and John Greene of Scott.
Farris, one of the top varsity bas-
ketball prospects from the fresh-
man squad, leaped 11'3%" in grab-
bing the broad jump, and man-
aged a heave good for third place
in the shot put.
Greene tied for first in the 440
with Clarence Peterson of Adams,
both men going the distance in
:58.5. Greene also took third in the
60-yard dash, which was won by
Jon Krueger of Allen-Rumsey.
Sisinyak Takes Shot
In, the shot put, defending
champ Gene Sisinyak of Gomberg
was barely edged by Kelsey's Sam
Sandeweiss, who threw the weight
42'6".
Van Tyne's Gene Thrailkill
brought home that house's only
first by going 10'6" in the pole
vault. Thrailkil's personal high is
11'0". accomplished when he was
a high school senior.
The final event of the evening
saw Bob Cook of Adams speed past'
past a field of 20 in capturing they
,880 in 2:13.0.

Michigan's w r e st 1i n g team
leaves today for the NCAA cham-
pionships which open toniorrow
at Pittsburgh, with the University
of Pittsburgh as host school.
It's been three weeks since the
Big Ten wrestling meet in which
the Wolverines, under the expert
tutelage of Coach Cliff Keen, fin-
ished second to Minnesota by only
one point.
Working Hard
During these three weeks the
Wolverines have been working al-
most day and night getting into
the best possible mental and phy-
sical shape attainable.
* Five men will make the trip to
the Steel City in hopes of bringing
back a coveted trophy. Foremost
among the Michigan entries is
captain Mike Rodriguez, who al-
most literally pinned his way to
the Big Ten 157-lb. championship.
Rodriguez will probably face his
roughest competition from Okla-
homa A & M's Doug Blubaugh and
Pittsburgh's Dave Johnson.
Other strong entries are con-
ference champion Max Pearson at
130 and Jack Marchello, runner-
up in the Conference 167-1b. divi-
sion. Pearson looked quite impres-
sive in regaining his lightweight
championship.
Only One Defeat
Marchello, undefeated in dual
meet competition and beaten only
once all year, holds a victory over
Johnson, the Eastern Collegiate
Champion, who has dropped down
to Rodriguez's weight.
Completing the Michigan en-
tries are the rapidly improving
Karl Lutomski and heavyweight
Steve Zervas. Lutomski, who fin-
ished a surprise third in the Big
Ten Meet, will compete in the
174-1b. class, and Zervas will drop
down from his usual heavyweight
slot to wrestle in the 191-lb. divi-
sion.
MAN! That U. of M.
Hair Styling is
Sharp!
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TRAVELOGUE
"Sunny Portugal"
MOTION PICTURES in NATURAL COLOR
TONIGHT at 8:30
Tickets: 90c (main floor, reserved)
50c (balcony, unreserved)
On Sale Today 10 A.M. Phone NO 3-151 1, Ext. 479
Oratorical Association - Hill Auditorium

ALL JUNE GRADUATES

Cash orders taken for:
Graduation Announcements
Graduation Booklets
Name Cards
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING . . . Window 8

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