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March 27, 1957 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-27

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THR

W E N S A , M A C 7195 H I H G A I YPA W 'I U '

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Bruins Beat
Wings, 3-1
In Playoffs
Canadians Win 4-1
In Stanley Cup Tilt
DETROIT, P) - Boston's eager
Bruins, checking fiercely all over
the ice for the full 60 minutes,
came from behind to whip the De-
troit Red Wings, 3-1, last night in
the first game of their best of
seven Stanley Cup preliminary
series.
The Red Wings, champions of
the National Hockey League and
Stanley Cup titlists four times in
the last seven years, were a pic-
ture of frustration after bolting to
a 1-0 lead in the first minute of
play.
They never mounted a serious
offensive after that first flurry
and much of the evening had
trouble getting the puck out of
their own zone.
Jack Caffery, Doug Mohns and
Real Chevrefils did the goal scor-
ing for the third place Bruins, who
were back in the cup playoffs aft-
er an absence of one year.
Montreal Wins
NEW YORK (MP)-Bernie (Boom
Boom) Geoffrion scored two goals
and assisted on two others to lead
the Montreal Canadiens to a 4-1
victory over the New York Rang-
ers in the opener of a best-of-
seven Stanley Cup semifinal series
at Madison Square Garden last
night.
Although Geoffrion figured in
all four 'Montreal goals, it was vet-
eranMaurice (The Rocket) Ri-
chard, who put the Flying French-
men in front for good midway in
the final stanza. The 35-year-old
winger snapped a 1-1 tie when he
deflected Geoffrion's 35-footer
with his glove into the right corner
of the cage.

Gonzales

Upset;'

New Honors

'M' Swimmers Considered
Among NCAA Favorites

Rosewall mWins
Kramer's Professional Tennis Tour
Attracts Large Ann Arbor Crowd

By PAUL BORMAN
When four characters get to-
gether, there is bound to be a spec-
tacle, but when these four char-
acters are also the best tennis
players in the world then there is
a show for all to enjoy.
Such was the case last night at
Ann Arbor High School gymna-
sium, where Jack Kramer pre-
sented Panch Gonzales, Ken Rose-
wall, Pancho Segura and Dinny
Pails in a tennis exhibition.
On the court, the four stars
thrilled an overflowing crowd with
their tennis wizardry for three
hours.
In the big match of the night,
Ken Rosewall downed Pancho
Gonzales, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3.
Battles Back
The underdog, holder of the
U.S. Singles title and an ex-mem-
ber of the Australian Davis Cup
team had the crowd rooting for
him as he battled back to defeat
Gonzales.

Gonzales startled the fans by
shutting out Rosewall in the open-
ing game of their match and then
going on to take the set, 6-1.
Rosewall, however, was not to
be denied and stormed back with a
stronger serve and a more polished
backhand to set back the champ
in the final two sets.
Opening the meet, Pancho Se-
gura easily downed Dinny Pails.
Fully utilizing his powerful two-
hand forehand shots, he never
seemed to completely tire, as did
his older opponent, Dinny Pails,
who is rumored to be 36 years old.
Doubles Match
Ending the evening of tennis the
four stars played a match of dou-
bles. I was the two Panchos
against Pails and Rosewall.
It went three sets and the Aus-
sies finally won, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.
In the locker room after the
game all four stars with their
various accents concluded that the
court was excellent as was the
crowd. Pails jokingly described the
fans as "almost Australian" which
occasioned a playful nudge by
Gonzales.
Refereeing the Gonzales-Rose-
wall match was Michigan's Barry
MacKay who did quite a formid-
able job.
Both Gonzales and Rosewall let
off some steam during the match.
Gonzales' method was slamming
the ball against the back wall,
while Rosewall tried to slam the
ball into the ceiling which had
just interrupted one of his lofts.

By AL WINKELSTEIN
A Michigan swimming team,
that at the start of the season
was given very little chance to fin-
ish anywhere near the top in the
Big Ten, will be one of the three
favorites in the NCAA meet at
Chapel Hill, North Carolina this
weekend.
To win, the Wolverines must
beat out two very formidable op-
ponents, Michigan State, the cur-
rent Big Ten champion, and Yale,
the Eastern champion and peren-
nial power.
Big Advantage
The natators have at least one
very big advantage. Ohio State,
last year's title holder is ineli-
gible to participate in she meet.
Although the Buckeyes are not
in the same class as the other
three, the Wolverines figure to
gain heavily from their absence.
Michigan's divers were rated as1
the second best in the Conference
behind the Olympic trio diving for
theeBuckeyes. But, with these1
three out, the Wolverines figure to
pick up a number of very valuable
points.
Yale must be rated as the fav-
orite on the basis of its record this
year. The Elis have literally
swamped every eastern foe, and
easily won the Eastern Intercolle-
giate Championship.
Tapping List
Topping th list of swimmers
from Yale is a sensational sopho-
more, Tim Jecko. Jecko performed
an amazing feat in the Easterns
with a triple win, taking top hon-
ors in the 100-yard and 200-yard

butterfly, and the individual med-
ley.
In a dual meet with Harvard
just before the Easterns, he set a
new world's record in the 200-yard
butterfly with the amazing time
of 2:08.7. The Wolverine's top
sophomore, Cy Hopkins, had just
set the world's record the day be-'
fore, at 2:12.1.
Michigan State, the Big Ten
champions, will be hard pressed
to repeat in the NCAA meet. The
Spartans have great depth, but
lack the individual stars that both
Michigan and Yale have.
Few Firsts
State won the Conference meet
on the strength of a number of
second, third and fourth place fin-
ishes. In the NCAA meet, they do
not figure to take as many places,
The Spartans' main hope rests
on their relay teams. If they can
win both relays, they have an ex
cellent chance to take the Nation-
al crown.
The Wolverines are taking elev-~
en swimmers to Chapel Hill, one
of the largest groups they have
entered in an NCAA tournament
in recent years.
As usual, Michigan will pin a
large part of its hopes on the two
sophomores who have been so out-
standing all year, Hopkins and
Dick Hanley.
EXHIBITION GAMES
Brooklyn 8, Philadelphia 3
Washington 8, Kansas City 7
Detroit 8, Cincinnati 4
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 0
Boston 6, L. A. PCL 5

-Daily-John Hirtzei
A REAL PRO - Pancho Segura demonstrates his famous two-
handed forehand in last night's professional tennis match against
Dinny Pails.

OUTDOOR TRACK PREVIEW:
Michigan Uncertain of Regaining Title
4

(This is the first of two articles
previewing the chances of the Michi-
gan track team in the coming out-
door campaign.)
By BOB BOLTON
Is the King dead?
This is the unspoken question
that is floating around Yost Field
House these days in regard to the
Michigan track team's chances ofj
regaining the Big Ten crown they

Five Returning Veterans
Make Golfers Optimistic

By AL JONESv
Michigan's golf squad will soon
initiate a newbseason that could
well prove to be one of the best
in history.
Blessedywith five veterans from
last season and four promising
sophomores, Coach Bert Katzen-
meyer is hoping to improve on last
year's very fruitful season.
The 'M' linksters of 1955-56
compiled a 9-6 overall record and
placed second in the Big Ten meet.
Only Purdue got the best of them,
ending up ahead, 2-i, in dual and
tri-meets, and finishing on top of
the Conference heap.
Two Gbne
Only two men are lost from last
year's squad, Bob McMasters, the
captain, by graduation, and Hank
Loeb, who is attending medical
school at Northwestern.
The five returnees are Captain
Steve Uzelac, John Schubeck, Stan
Kwasiborski, Fred Micklow, and
Skip MacMichael. Schubeck was
the top man in the Big Ten meet
for Michigan last year, with a

fourth place finish, however, all
of the men had more good days
than bad.
Katzenmeyer is extremely
pleased with the showing of his
four sophomore prospects. Ray
Lovell, John Law, Pat Keefe, and1
Arnold Nedelman have all showed
potential and will threaten the
standing of the lettermen as the
season progresses.
Working Indoors
The squad has been working in-
doors most of the time thus far,
although they were out a few'days
last week at Huron Hills Country
Club. Katzenmeyer will be prepar-
ing to select his best seven men
next week for the spring trip
south.
The team will encounter the
University of North Carolina and
Duke, a perenial golf power, dur-
ing spring vacation, on April 11
and 12 respectively.
Then they will return and pre-
pare for the Conference season'
which will begin in late April.

lost earlier this month at Colum-
bus.
The final answer will be decided
after the outdoor finals take place
in Evanston, June 1, when the
Michigan track men will have a
chance to regain the champion-
ship that they lost to Indiana.
Quite frankly Coach Don Can-
ham admits, "I just don't know if
we can win it." However, he is
also quick to add that, "We have
a very good chance."
Canham's pessimistic attitude
and the team's success (four
championships in the last five
tries) makes "a good chance"
sound like "a sure win." However
there are several obstacles that
bar a Wolverine comeback and the
toughest one to overcome will be
spirit'.
It could be very possible that
Michigan, after racking up four
straight titles, was no longer hun-
gry when they ran in the indoor
finals down at Columbus.
Trophies, No Hunger
When a team is hungry for vic-
tory they are inclined to give ev-
erything they have in the way of
talent and drive but when the
trophy cases are full the hunger
passes and without it titles are
hard to come by.
At Columbus the Wolverines
could have scored heavily in the
odd' events (300-yd., 600-yd., and
1 ,000-yd. runs) and the 880-yd.
run, considering the men they had
entered.
The Wolverines did not score
heavily, however. In fact in the
four events they only took two
points. Those points came on Dick
Flodin's fourth place finish in the
300-yd. dash.
In the other events men like
Robin Varian, Don Matheson and

Cleveland Worried Over Hip
Injury to Star Pitcher Wynn,

TUCSON, Ariz: (A)-Early Wynrv
can hardly walk, let alone pitch,
and that has the Cleveland In-
dians worried.
The 37-year-old righthander
may not be ready when the season
opens three weeks from yester-
day.
Wynn pulled a hip tendon while
warming up for an exhbiition
against the New York Giants on
March 17. He hasn't been in uni-
form since. Part of the time he
has been unable to walk.
His injury is the most serious

George Gluppe, all proven com-
petitors, failed to place and their
failure dealt a fatal blow to Mich-
igan.
To win the outdoors, among
other things, Michigan needs top
performances from these four men
and top performances will be giv-
en only if these men are at the
proper mental and physical peak.

of a rash of ailments that have
heckled the Indians.
Vic Wertz, a cinch to start at
first base, was ill with a fever.
Herb Score, the aceksouthpaw
pitcher, wrenched a knee. Ray
Narleski, speedy right handed re-
liefer, broke a finger on his pitch-
ing hand. Larry Raines, a top
rookie shortstop prospect, broke a
toe. Jim Hegan, the veteran catch-
er, has a bruised and infected
hand.
But the injury to Wynn really
worries Kerby Farrell, the Indians'
new manager.

ED GAGNIER. was elected cap-
tain of the 1957-58 gymnastics
team yesterday and for the sec-
ond straight year was named the
most valuable member of the
team.
New College
Cage Rulings
KANSAS CITY (A')-The Na-
tional Basketball Committee, tink-
ering with the college and AAU
rules again, has changed the code
on free throws and made a ges-
ture against stalling.
The committee Monday decided
the first six common fouls in each
half shall be one-shot violations.
Free throws on succeeding fouls
will be awarded under the pres-
ent one-and-one bonus basis.
Taking note of "actionless or
farcial games," the committee said
unnecessary stalling by a team
shall bring a warning from the
game officials. A technical foul can
be called if the warning has no
effect.
The new rule is aimed at teams
which refuse to provide action, the
committee explained. Slowdowns
will still be all right.
COEDS:
it's Hairstyling
and Cutting time!
See the latest styles
in our window
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

COLLEGE GRADUATES
(Salary $4,802 to start)
State Government offers Comprehensive
Training Programs in:
ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYSIS
EMPLOYMENT COUNSELING
PERSONNEL (Detroit Only)
ECONOMIC RESEARCH
HIGHWAY PLANNING (Lansing Only)
SEVERAL POSITIONS TO BE FILLED SOON. These positions
involve intensive on-the-job development programs leading to
professional status in a given field. Applicants must be college
graduates by June, 1957. Variations in majors required according
to class.
WRITE for application for examination before April 17 to Michi-
gan Civil Service, Lansing 13.

k-
M
I
i
-1

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1

0

i

BOB MARSHALL'S
has the Books
has the Bargains

I

I

h I U

MICHIGAN CRIB
PRE-LAW SOCIETY
PRESENTS

FFUTURE
LAWYERS

World
famous

PROF. ERIC STEIN

GENERAL
MOTORS
t NTERVIEWING
for',SUMMEFt JOBS
with
GENERAL MOTORS
APRIL 3 AND 4

speaking on
"INTERNATIONAL LAW"
THURSDAY, MARCH 28 ... 8 P.M.
RooM 3511 - STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING

VICKERS
INCORPORATED
(Leader In Oil Hydraulics)
Extends An Invitation To
Students Majoring In Engineering & Science
To Explore Employment Opportunities
In Engineering, Research, Sales
And Manufacturing With
The World's Leading Manufacturer
Of Oil Hydraulic Equipment
Our, Representative Will Be
On Your Campus

Our College Representative will
visit your campus shortly to inter-
view applicants for summer posi-
tions with the many decentralized
divisions of General Motors.
Vacation-time jobs with GM and
its divisions -- besides providing a
source of extra funds--serve as

extremely valuable experience.
Frequently they lead to rewarding
permanent positions with GM.
We cordially invite you to arrange
an interview with the GM College
Representative through your Place-
ment Office on one of the above
listed dates.!,

Refreshing antiseptic action heals
razor nicks. helps keen your skin

AFTER SHAVE
LOTION

in flop condition. 1.00 Olus tax
SHULTON New York . Toronto

IV1 Summer Positions Available! in.
r
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING " MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING " CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING, INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Y1TTT.11kXT0/ *n"tF T1TT'grf4T.4r4

FRIDAY,
MARCH 29. 1957

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