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March 20, 1957 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1957-03-20

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PAN six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2A, 1957

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, ~4ARCH 20, 1q57

JAZZ MEDIUM:
'Post-Script' Ballet Performs Tonight

"Post-Script," a ballet in the
jazz medium, will be one of three
ballets to be performed tonight!
by the National Ballet Company of
Canada.
Written by a well-known Cana-
dian jazz composei, Arthur Mur-
row, the ballet had its premier per-'
formance in Montreal, Canada
last year.
The company will present two
other ballets at 8:30 p.m. today in'
the Michigan Theater. They are
. "Les Rendez-Vous" and "Offen-
bach in the Underworld."
. First Premier
"Les Rendez-Vous" was first
premiered with the Sadler Wells:
Ballet group in London in 1933.
Celia Franca, who formerly danced
with Sadler-Wells, made "Les
Rendez-Vous" a part of the Na-
tional Ballet of Canada's repertoire
when she became prima ballerina
and artistic director of the com-
pany six years ago.
A Paris cafe sets the scene for
the ballet, "Offenbach in the Un-
derworld." Here, people from all
walks of life meet and mingle.
There is no story to the ballet-
neither a sad ending nor a happy
one. The ballet just has a closing
time.
The Canadian National Ballet,
directed by Miss Franca, features
Lois Smith and David Adams as
its principal dancers. Carrying a
cast of 78 young people, the com-
pany has its own orchestra under
the direction of George Crum andJ
Concert Master Charles Dobias.
. Performance Sponsor
The Ann Arbor Civic Ballet is
sponsoring the performance. A
non - profit organization, the
group's purpose is to provide an
opportunity for young people to
carry, on their ballet work in aj
civic ballet ballet corps.
This ballet corps presents two
or three free programs annually
for the public.
Prof. Filler
To Give Talk
On Education
Prof. Louis Filler of Antioch
College will speak on "Main Cur-
rents in Progressive American1
Education," at 4:15 p.m. today
in Aud. C.
Prof. Filler believes that the
twentieth century needs very
much to overcome the effects of
"social lag." He say that basic
disciplines cannot be imposed un-i
less society finds ways 'and means
of forcing assimilation and reten-1
tion of skills.
The lecture will be conductedi
under the auspices of the School1
of Education and History Depart-1
ment.
Organization
Notices
Hillel Lecture, March 20 8:00 p.m.,
Hillel. Rabbi Milton Rosenbaum: "Hol-
iday Observance."
* * *
D e u t s c h e r Verein. Kaffeestunde,
March 20, 3:30-5:00 'p.m., So. Cafe.,
Union.
Westminster Student Fellowship,
midweek Lenten service, March 20, 7:15
p.m., First Presbyterian Church. Speak-
er: The Rev. Greenhoe.
w u
American Nuclear Sooiety, Engineer-
ing Progress meeting, March 20, 7:30
p.m., Baer Conference Room, Cooley
Building, North Campus. Speakers will
include: Dr. I. J. Gomberg, Dr. W.
Kerr, and Mr. W.K. Luckow.
Lutheran Student Association, Lenten
service, March 20, 7:15 p.m., Chapel.
Roger Williams Fellowship, midweek
tea, March 20, 4:00-5:00 p.m., Guild
House.

CAN CAN CHORUS--Ballerinas perform In the National Ballet
of Canada's presentation of "Orpheus in the Underworld."
Romney Cites Concern
For Automroile Industry

Old Venetian
Photographs
On Display
One of the most characteristic
sights of the area surrounding
Venice is the abundance of ancient
villas, some over 400 years old.
A photographic exhibition of
these villas is touring the United!
States presently, and can be seen
until Sunday at the University's
Museum of Art. Circulated in this
country by the Smithsonian Insti-
tute of Washington and supported
by the Italian government, the
exhibition has already been dis-
played in Rome, Paris and Lon-
don.
Many Photographs
The display includes 144 photo-
graphs, showing the style trans-
formation of the villa from early
Venetian Gothic in the late 14th
century to Neoclassicism in the
19th century.
Of prime importance in the ex-
hibition are the villas designed by
Andrea- Palladio during the 16th
century, who brought the villa to
its highest point of perfection
It was his work that inspired
Thomas Jefferson in the design of
his home, Monticello, and of the
University of Virginia.
Villa Evolution
The villa, a country home used
for peaceful purposes, evolved
from the warlike castle in the 15th
century when Venice first became
a peace-loving state.
At present, they are in a grave
state of decay. The Italian govern-
ment hopes that the present tour
will arouse enough interest in the
people of the world to prevent their
future demolishment.
Annual Law
Meeting Slated
This Weekend
Approximatelyh500 attorneys
from Michigan, Ohio and Indiana
are expected in Ann Arbor riday
and Saturday for the eighth an-
nual Institute on Advocacy.
"Selling Your Case to The Jury"
is the theme of the meeting, be-
ing sponsored by the University
Law School in cooperation with
the State Bar of Michigan and
the Committee of Continuing Ed-
ucation of the American Law In-
stitute.
The salesmanship pointers will
begin with "Selling Your Case
Through Direct and Cross-Exam-
ination of Medical Witness."
Saturday morning's session will
feature a discussion and demon-
stration of techniques of advo-
cacy by Wilfred R. Lorry, of Phil-
adelphia, attorney and lecturer for
the American Law Institute.
Saturday a f t e r n o o n, Prof.
Charles W. Joiner, of the law
school, will discuss changes in
methods of appealing cases. Wil-
liam Laird, president of the
Washtenaw County Bar Associa-
tion will preside at the session.
VOTE - VOTE - VOTE
Hear Your

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
ROUAULT'S REALM-Simple in form and with broad black
strokework, this print, entitled "Lord it is You, I recognize You"
typifies Rouault's religious work.
Religious Prints on Display
During Lent at 'U' Museum.

(Continued front Page 4)
George Hein will speak on "Some 1, 3-
Shifts."
Physical-Analytical-Inorganic Semin-
ar. 7:30 p.m., Thurs.. March 21, Room
3005, Chemistry Building. Robert Ma-
chol will speak on "Chemical Documen-
tation with Emphasis on Mechanical
Retrieval."
Placement Notices
Personnel Interviews:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engrg. School:
Thurs., March 21
Air Reduction Co., Inc., Murray Hill,
N. J. - all levels in Ch.E., Aero., Elect.,
Ind., Instr., Mech., Engrg. Mech., Metal,
Physics and Science for Research, De-
velopment, Design and Sales
Burroughs Corp.; Detroit, Mich. -
all levels in Mech., Elect., Physics and
Math., B.S. and M.S. in Che. E., Ind..
for Design, Development, Research,
Production of Electronics Computing
and Data Handling, Electro-Mechanical
Business Machines and other Electron-
ics Equipment.
Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, De-
troit, Mich. - all levels in Civil, Const.,
Elect., and Mech., B.S. in Naval & Ma-
rine for Summer, Coop, and Regular
Development, Design, and Construction.
King-Seeley Corp., Ann Arbor, Mich.
-all levels in Aero., Ch.E., Civil, Constr.
Mech., Metal., Municipal, Naval & Ma-
rine, Nuclear, Sanit., & Science for De-
velopment, Design, Standards, Plant
Layout, Estimating, and Quality Con-
trol.
Louisiana Dept. of Highways, Baton
Rouge, La. - all degrees in Civil for
Research, Design, Construction, Test-
ing, Planning, Traffic.
Northern Illinois Gas Co., Bellwood,
11. - B.S.. or M.S. in Ch.E., Civil,
Elect., Ind.; B.S in Mech for various
locations and activities
Fri, March 22
Koppers Co, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa. -
all levels in Ch.E., Civil, Constr., Elect.,
Sid., Inst., Mech., Engrg. Mech., Metal.,
Nuclear, and Science for Summer and
Regular Research, Development, Design,
Production, Const., and Sales.

Illinois Poser Co., Decatur, Ill -- all
levels in Civil, Elect., and Mech. for
Development, Design. Production and
Gas Distribution.
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W.E., ext. 2182.
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
The Kroger Company, Detroit, Mich.
-Location of work: Detroit and Mid-
west, South. Men with A.B., B.S., M.A.,
M.B.S. or L.L.B. in Marketing, Econ-
omics, Personnel, Accounting, Trans-
portation, Retailing and Advertising
for Management Training Program in
Merchandising, Warehouse & Trans-
portation, Accounting, Real Estate,
Personnel, Advertising and Sales Pro-
motion.
The College Life Insurance Company
of America, Indianapolis, Ind. - Loca-
tion of work: Openings in most states.
Men with any degree for Sales and
Sales Management.
King-Seeley Corporation. Ann Arbor,
Mich. - Men with B.A. or'B.S. in Lib-
eral Arts or Business Administration
for Accounting, Production Control,
Standards, Plant Layout and Estimat-
ing.
Fri., March 22
The Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo,
Michigan. - Men with B.A., B.S., in
Biological Sciences, Physiology and
Chemistry; Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental
for Pharmaceutical Sales. Detailing and
selling to Doctors, Hospitals and Drug
Stores. Location of work: Michigan
and Northwestern Ohio.
Standard Oil Company (Indiana),
Grand Rapids, Mich. - Location of
work: Grand .Rapids and Western part
of Michigan. Men with A.B. In any
field for Sales.
Additional information can be ob-
tained from the Bureau by ooming into
the office or calling extension 3371, at
the University. Material is also avail-
able on many of the companies inter-
viewing during the week of March 18,
1957.
Summer Placement: The weekly Sum-
mer Placement Meeting will be held
Wednesday, March 20, 1957 in Roam 3-G
of the Michigan Union. Positions are
available for Resorts and Camps, Indus-
try, both technical and non-technical
positions. Hours: 9-4:45 p.m,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

CHICAGO (R) - George Rom-
ney, president of American Mo-
tors Corp. said yesterday that due
to a conflict between price "dis-
cipline" and "inflationary wage
increases" the long range "outlook
for the automobile industry has
"become the major economic and
political concern of our day."
He added:
"Through laws that protect the
competitive process, prices are
subject to needed discipline.
Romney, addressing the Nation-
al Installment Credit Conference
of the American Bankers Assn.,
continued:
Beclouded Outlook
"Until this problem is solved, the
long range outlook for the auto-
mobile business is beclouded."
The problem ''has become the
major economic and political con-
cern of our day," Romney said.
Romney further stated:
"A basic cause of our national
economic problems, in my view, is
that the country is trying to dq
too much in too short a time. For
example, our federal government
is making huge miiltary and for-
eign aid expenditures, thereby re-
ducing the goods and services
available to the civilian economy.
Standard of Living
Too many private citizens, too,
are trying to increase their stan-
dards of living too rapidly. Too
many businesses are trying to
build new production facilities
now, thus competing with other
industries for materials and
skilled labor.
"I am not opposing foreign aid,
necessary military expenditures,
industrial expansion, or other de-
sirable programs. I just believe it
is time we paused for some sober
examination to answer this ques-
tion:
Aren't we trying to do too much

in too short a time? And in stifling
profits, aren't we starving the
goose that laid the golden egg?"
Production Increase
Referring to wage and fringe
benefit advances within the auto
industry, Romney said the rate of
productivity increase has not kept
pace and it now "takes more man-
hours to build a car than was re-
quired in 1950."
"It is questionable whether
Walter Reuther, president of the
United Automobile Workers, is do-
ing his members a real service if
his current efforts and his pro-
jected program for 'walloping' the
automobile companies result in
still further inflation," he said.
"The illusion of getting more
money may be a heady experience
now, but the severe headaches
would confront today's workers,
just as they already have come to
the aged, the pensioners, the wi-
dows, and other members of our
society who have been depending
on savings to tide them over."
Orientation
Registration
0 to Men
Open ft
Men students who wish to be
orientation leaders next fall may
sign up from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
starting today in the Union Stu-
dent Offices.
The Union Administration
Committee announced that inter-
views will be held at a later date
for those who sign up without
previous experience as orientation
leaders.

By EDYTHE HABER
During this Lent season, the
University's Museum of Art is pre-
senting an exhibition entitled "Re-
ligious Prints From Durer to Rou-
ault."
The exhibition contains 40
prints, some from the museum's
own collection and the others
from the collection of George
Binet, a print dealer.
The display serves to show how
a single theme can vary in style
of presentation from era to era.
For example, as the title indicates,
the exhibition shows prints by Al-
brecht Durer and Georges Rou-
ault.
Durer Prints
Durer, the greatest early Print-
maker, lived in Nuremburg in the
late 15th and 16th centuries. His
prints are entitled Christ Shown
to the People and Christ Taking
Leave From His Mother. They are
both filled with a wealth of de-
tails, backgrounds and characters
carefully delineated.
Rouault, a contemporary French
paimter has a very different style.
His prints are starkly simple,
characterized by broad black
strokes. His figures approximate
man but don't show every -har-
acteristic of man.
Of course not all the modern
prins follow Rouault's form. There
are some, such as Charles Bou-
leau's Christ Shown to The People,
that follow an older stylistic tra-
dition.
Most of the contemporaries fol-

low a generally more modern,
slightly more abstract form,
though different from Rouault's.
An example is This Beginning of
Miracles, a color print by Sister
Mary Corita, IHM, a contempor-
ary American.
It resembles the reflection of
stained glass on a wall, colored by
soft olive green, violet, pink and
yellow, with touches of brighter
green scattered throughout. Line
figures are an intrinsic part of
the pattern.
Among the somewhat older
prints shown are two illustra-
tions from Gustave Flaubert's
The Tempt9tion of Saint-Antoine,
published in 1896.
Rembrandt Prints
Two Rembrandt prints are in-
cluded in the exhibition. They are
both of Christ at Emmaus, one
larger than the other, but both
fairly small. Both are simple, little
prints showing a glowing Christ
dining among humble, poverty-
stricken mortals.
Of the prints before Rembrandt,
Durer's are far from being the
most detailed. Many of the early
French and German printsmakers
seemed to have considered accur-
ate and minute details as the most
important components of their
works.
Thus, in a variety of styles, from
the detailed work of the old mas-
ters to the stark simplicity and
power of Rouault, religion has
been an important theme for
printmakers.

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Congratulations, Michigan 1957 Graduating Class
From KING-SEELEY CORP., Ann Arbor, Michigan
What are your plans for Future Employment?
# We have opportunities for graduates of electrical and mechanical engi-
neers, engineering physics graduates, and graduates with B.S. in physics
in our engineering laboratories.
II WA ncIv n nI riicfr rAitc wt n

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This growth combination means many
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If you are a chemical, civil, electrical,
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