100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 20, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY; -MARCH 20,1857

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACn Vwel

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rnAIr rVr

i

ADC To Vote Officers'
For Assembly Monday

Jazz ConcertI

Queer Face in Familiar Place

DECADES OF CHANGE:
Rushing Takes Informal Twist

To

Highlight

--Dauy-Ed raz
BETSY ALEXANDER
Betsy Alexander and Ginny Mc-
Bride are running for the office
of Assembly Association President.y
Members of the Assembly Dor-
mitory Council will vote on the
two candidates Monday.
Miss Alexander is now first vice-
president of Assembly. A junior in,
the literary college, she has served
on the committee for the Confer-
ence of Leadership Training and
worked on the central committee,
forCampus Religious Emphasis
Week.a
A sophomore in the literary col-
lege, Miss McBride has been ac-
tive in Angell House affairs. She
has served as the athletics chair-
man and chairman of the dormi-
tory formal.
Both candidates presented their
platforms at the last ADC meet-
ing.
Miss Alexander advocates: 1) an
ADC human relations committee
to work with the League and
SGC; 2) more extensive pre-plan-
ning of the big-sister program andj
the ADO booklet for freshmen, 3)
regular meetings of the house
scholarship chairmen.
4) an undergraduate counseling
program; 5) required representa-
tion at ADO meetings and 6)
member's time at ADC meetings
to consider the problems and ideas'
of the dorms.
In outlining her platform, Miss,
McBride favors: 1) a rigid train-
ing for big sisters to acquaint1
them with the working of ADC,
Senate, Rackham Counseling,
0Cs, the League and Health Ser-
vice counseling.
2) Integration of undergraduate
counseling to suplement and com-1

-Daily-Ed Graff
GINNY McBRIDE

Greek Week
'Satchmo' Armstrong
To Play for Campus
Next Friday Evening
Greek Week will bring Louis
(Satch) Armstrong and his All-
Stars to Ann Arbor in a jazz con-
cert at 7:15 and 9:30 p.m. Fri-
day, March 29, in Hill Auditorium.
Completing the bill for the
Armstrong Concert are clarinetist
Edmond Hall, trombonist Squire
Gersh, vocalist Velma Middleton
and Billy Kyle.
Wednesday is the last day that
block and single tickets can be
ordered in the League undergrad-
uate office. All tickets go on sale
Monday, March 25, in Hill Audi-
torium.
Armstrong, who has gained the
reputation of an "Ambassador of
American Goodwill" according to
critics, recently presented 175
shows all over Europe and sever-
al in Africa during his 90-day trip.
Beforeperformingin Russia Satch
said he hoped to "bruise them
with happy music."
Leaving behind him what critics
call a trail of goodwill, trumpetist
Satch began his tour of the States.
A spokesman from the U.S. Em-
bassy in London, commenting on
Armstrong, said, "He's very use-
ful and very helpful." For a dip-
lomat it's tantamount to saying
in jazz, "That cat's terrific."
New York City's Basin Street
was the scene of Armstrong's first
appearance. He followed this with
a concert at the Newport (R.I.)
Jazz Festival. Now appearing at
New York's Radio City Music Hall,
Satch is playing the music from
the movie "High Society."
Chairman of the Armstrong
Concert is Mike Jackson. Assist-
ing him are Tom Calcaterra, Art
Gaudi, Lynn Laviolette, Sally Mil-
ler, Fred Trost and Rob Trost.

By SALLY LEASE
In the more than half-century
that sororities have been on cam-
pus, the trend in the Greek sys-
tem has been toward increased
informality.
The casual Bermuda parties in-
cluded in today's rushing schedule
are far from reminiscent of the
former teas, where hats and heels
were the required dress.
As far back as 1890, the rules
prohibiting rushee-sorority con-
tact in conversation during rushj
period began. The sororities de-
cided that when all the upper-
classmen went down to meet the
train that brought the freshmen
to the University, only two coeds
from each sorority could be pres-
ent.
No Campus Panhel
National Panhellenic originated
in 1906, but campus Panhellenic
groups did not function on this
campus until later. In the early
1912's, the sororities still were
banded together as the Inter-
Sorority Association.
At first, rushees were required

to wear hats and heels to the teas,
but as the campus became more
casual the sororities followed the
general trend.
It was agreed among the loose
bond of sororities that if any sor-
ority did not wish to follow the
standard procedure, they were at,
complete freedom to do as they
wished. Even now the rules are
adapted to the needs of the time
and are constantly changing.
Democratic Changes
All of the changes are made by
a democratic body composed of
the rushing chairmen from each
house. They meet as a group and
decide on a general policy that is
to be followed by every sorority.
Panhellenic officials say that
"Each set of parties is necessary,
for it is unusual for a girl to know
which house she prefers at the

very beginning." All the parties
are to narrow down both the sor-
orities' and rushee's choices.
Each rushee is required to go to
mixers (the first set of parties)
because it is "hoped that she will
decide as she goes through rush
that several houses are suitable
for her needs."
Tabulating Service
1956 was the second year that
the tabulating service had been
used in clerical work for rushing.
It facilitated and speeded up de-
termining choices of rushees and
sororities.
Officials add that the sorority
system has progressed since its
beginning years of loose organi-
zation. "A more compact and in-
fluential body has been developed
to work cooperatively with the
other campus organizations."

t

i

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
SNOOTRAC VOTES-Snootrac, mysterious campus figure seen
poking his unshapely snout into various activities during the last
few weeks, turned up again yesterday at a polling table. Close

pliment the present graduate
counseling; 3) more personal com-
munications between ADOand in-
dependent women.
Junior Coeds
To Entertain
At 'Live ItUp
The curtain is ready to rise on
"Live It Up," this year's Junior
Girl's Play.
Its plot, traditionally kept se-
cret until opening night, will be
revealed to coeds at Senior Night
festivities tomorrow evening.
Other students may attend the
8 p.m. Friday and Saturday night
shows or the 2:30 p.m. matinee on
Saturday at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
Ethel A. McCormick, social di-
rector of the League, is a faith-
ful JGP attendee. When she talks
of past performances, the director
always chuckles over the follow-
ing incident in a play several
years ago:
A coed was on stage playing the
part of a dead soldier. Another
character, miscued, asked the dead
soldier, "What's your name so I
can write your mother?"
After several unanswered
queries the questionerand audi-
ence both began to see the mis-
take. Before the embarrassed coed
could run off the stage in confu-
sion, the dead soldier "saved" the
day and play with a speedy reju-
venation and even faster thinking.
She said matter-of-factly, "My
mother, knows my name."

associates of the creature say that
soon be revealed.

his identity and function will

Theta Sigma Phi
Pledges 7 Women
Theta Sigma Phi, professional
and honorary fraternity for wo-
men in journalism, initiated seven
coeds Sunday.
Taking the pledge were Penny
Adams, Joan Foster, Gloria Head,
Imogene Jividen, Rose Perlberg
and Susan Raunheim.
Theta Sigs plan a jobs panel
at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 28, in
the League. Women from various
branches in journalism will make
up the panel and discuss oppor-
tunities for new graduates in the
field.

9 P.M. WEDNESDAY Channel 2
h e mo:{:,:i:?$.:{.}.:.:::w:}}{"t.":Tv.:".:.:.: heii k" :vh{i?:":..T ;
m o...v.;a...niflom ntv:,:

LAST DAY TO ENTER!
ART DEPT.-UNION ART
contest and exhibit
Paintings, Drawings, and Sculptors
accepted today only
Union Stu dent OffiCes
2 to 5:30 P.M.
Looking
for GOOD
ADRYCLEAN ING?

i

.

I

x*. ... . . .. ?t : .Y i"
Second in the great new TV
Science Series that began with
"Our Mr. Sun." The fascinat-
ing story of blood and circula-
tion. Produced and directed by
FRANK CAPRA.

Open till 10
Every Hite but Sunday
BOB MARSHALL'S

{I

r

Starring RICHARD CARL
and DR. FRANK BAXTER
In full color and
black and white
Sponsored by the
BELL
TELEPHONE
SYSTEM

wRe
R .

All This Is Part Of Our Regular Service
FAST SERVICE ON REQUEST
GOLD BOND CLEANERS
515 East William . . . Mon.-Fri.7-6 . . . Sat.7-5

Phones
NO 8-6335
NO 8-7017

1rug a enion gv-
en to each garment, trouser cuffs
brushed and tacked, seam rips re-
paired, buttons replaced, and linings
sewed.

Let FOLLETT'S
buy your text books
Sell them for CASH
at
BE SLY! State at N. University

f.

Ii

SANDLEP
OF BOSTON
Are Famous for Their
Pumps with the Little feels

Marlboro

._.

lmm

k

S

The

TILLETTO

In

I

BLACK PATENT
or
NAVY BLUE
KID
T109
The PATENTS

to Size 10

l
J am'
t ^ :,

I '41"'

..:::-..

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan