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March 20, 1957 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-20

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,mvv DNESDAY, MARCH 20,1957

I. BE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAG N TMI

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 1957 THE MICHiGAN DAILY PAEW .PUUw

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0

Phi

Gums

Win Second Place

B' Basketball Title

x

Delta Upsilon Gains Third
Place 'B' Crown by Forfeit
41

FRESHMAN CAGE SQUAD:
Strack Considers Miller Top Prospect

By SI COLEMAN
Final games are starting to take
place in I-M basketball.
Last night in fraternity action,
Phi Gamma Delta nearly doubled
the score on Sigma Nu, 43-24, as
it clinched the 'B' league second
place championship.
Third and fourth place cham-
pions in the same league were al-
so determined as intramural bas-
ketball reached its climactic stage.
Delta Upsilon captured third
place when Tau Kappa Epsilon
forfeited.
In the first game of the evening,
Phi Sigma Delta claimed the
fourth place championship when
it defeated Pi Lambda Phi, 15-10.
Highest Score
The highest scoring game of the
evening saw the Phi Gams, using
a well-balanced attack, get off to
1=M lTO Hold
Open House
Plans have just about been
completed for this year's I-M
Open House, according to Sports
Building Supervisor Earl Riskey.
All- that remains to be done in
the way of preparation for Thurs-
day night's 26th annual spectacu-
lar is to line up teams for a co-ed
volleyball game.
Admission to the affair is free.
The first events on the 16-sport
program are scheduled to start at
6:30 p.m.

a 7-0 lead before Sigma Nu broke
its own ice.
Phi Gamma Delta opened its
lead to 10 points, mainly on the
accurate shooting of Jim Ellis
and the hard driving of Dave Hal-
ler, and led at the half, 21-12.
SigmaNu never seriouslychal-
lenged and Phi Gain continued
to apply pressure throughout the
last half to win going away.
Haller topped the scorers with
12 points, followed by Ellis' nine
and Walt Scherer's identical total.
Contrast
In contrast to this high point
total game, Pi Lambda Phi and
Phi Sigma Delta both had trouble
finding the range and as a re-
sult, they pumped in a combina-
tion of only 25 points.
Only one game occurred in 'A'
ileague action and this was a
fourth place final. This game saw
Trigon top Zeta Psi, 15-14. At
the final buzzer a foul was called
and Zeta .Psi's Don Way could
have tied the count had he made
the shot.
In the only other game of the
night, the Independent AFROTC
nosed out the Bermaids, 36-33.
OTHER I-M SCORES
I-M VOLLEYBALL
Psych "A"5, Sociology 1
English 5, Biochemistry 1
Geology 5, Zoo Grads 1
Air Science 4, Economics "A" 2
I-M WATER POLO
Chi Phi over Pi Lambda Phi,.
(forfeit)
Delta Chi 1, Phi Kappa Tau 0
Phi Delta Theta 1, Delta Upsilon 0

By JOHN HILLYER
Who will be shouldering the re-
sponsibility of replacing Ronj
Kramer and Jim Shearon on next
year's Michigan basketball team?
How much can the squad ex-
pect to be improved as a result of1
the moving up of this year's f resh-4
man prospects?
Freshman coach Dave Strack
may not Ie able to give definite
answers to these questions, but he1
has some definite ideas.7
High up on Strack's list of hope-
fuls is a solid young man from
South Side Nigh in Fort Wayne,
Ind., named Terry Miller. Of allI
the freshmen, Miller is the only
one given a better-than-even
chance of cracking the starting
five next season.
Can Do Anythingt
M Iler, a guard, can do almost1
anything expected of a player, and
possesses good speed
Tallest among the first-year men
is lanky Bob Bolton. from Battley
Creek Lakeview, who stands 6'9".
Bolton is cited as a "good prospect
and a hard worker."
Dick LeMay, a 671" forward
from Cincinnati, O., was said by
Lakers Edge
Pistons; Gain
Division Finals
FORT WAYNE, Ind. )-Clyde
Lovellette connected on a rebound
with four seconds left and Min-
neapolis beat Fort Wayne last
night, 110-108, to take the first
round playoff series in the Western
Division of the National Basketball
Association.
The Lakers made a clean sweep
of the best of two out of three
game series and will now face the
St. Louis Hawks in the final round
of the Western Division Playoffs.
Syracuse playsBoston tomorrow
night in the Eastern Division
finals.
NATIONAL INVITATIONAL
Quarterfinals
Temple 77, Dayton 66
Bradley 116, Xavier (Ohio) 81
CANOE TRIPS
Total cost $5.75 per diem for a
thrilling vacation in the Quetico-
Super ^-'-4erness.
Four information write:
CANOE COUNTRY OUTFITTERS
Bill Rom, Box 717 C, Ely, Minn.

Strack to be "one of the better
freshman prospects and very like-
ly to make a major contribution"I
next year.
A pleasant surprise was Dale
Kingsbury, a 6'1" guard from Flint
Central, who teamed with Miller
as the top freshman back-court
man. Kingsbury, says Strack,'
"looked exceptionally good at
times and has a good chance of
helping us out."
Helpful Height
Jim Green, from Terre Haute,
Ind., could supply some "-elpful
height (6'6"). A Herrin, Ill., per-
former, Green is a good rebound-
er and can play forward or cen-
ter.
Another big man, Gordon Rog-
ers from Utica, stands 61". Rogers
played at Western Michigan as a
sophomore and had to spend this
past season with the freshmen in
order to comply with the residence
regulations.

Rogers is "a good pivot man, and
it is hoped that he will help to fill
Kramer's shoes" to some extent.
Speed could be supplied by Lov-
ell Farris, a six-footer from Cleve-
land. Some improvement in his
outside shooting could make Far-
ris, a forward, a top-flight player.
Chuck Teuscher, an East Au-
rora, Ill., athlete, could figure in
Varsity Coach Bill Perigo's plans.
A 6'1" man who can play either
forward or guard, Teuscher is "a
very good shooter," according to
Strack, but is also an outstanding
football end prospect, and it is
uncertain whether he can make
the switch from one sport to the
other effectively.
John Wylie, who comes from
Shearon's high school in Toledo,
O.,, was one of the strongest re-
bounders the freshmen had. A 6'3"
player, Wylie is also a tennis hope-
ful. Strack says he could develop
into a top performer.

PROFESSIONAL TENNIS-Jack Kramer will bring the world's four outstanding tennis players to
Ann Arbor March 26 in his professional tennis tour. The matches will be held in the Ann Arbor High
School gym. Heading the tour are Poncho Gonzales, Australian Davis Cup stars Ken Rosewall and
Dinny Pails, and Pancho Segura. Since Kramer defeated Australia's Frank Sedgman, 54-41 matches
in his last tennis debut in 1953, Gonzales has been the tour's top player. Gonzales beat Tony Trabert
in 1955, 74-27, and is presently carrying a wide edge over his nearest opponent, Rosewall. The matches

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will pit Gonzales against Rosewall,
and Pails in doubles.

Segura against Pails, and Gonzales and Segura against Rosewall

HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING:
Records Fall in Ann Arbor Title min

If

By FRANK MABLEY
Enthusiastic high school stu-
dents jammed their way into Jeni-
son Pool at East Lansing Saturday
night, to watch Ann Arbor win the
Class A Michigan High School
State Swimming Meet for the sec-
ond straight year.
This 34th annual meet, in which
31 Michigan high schools parti-
cipated, saw some of the most out-
standing high school swimmers in
the country. A total of six State
records and one national high
school record were broken.
Ann Arbor by Point
Victory for Ann Arbor was by
a mere one point over Battle Creek
and just two points over Jackson.
Had Battle Creek won the final
-event, the 200-yd. freestyle relay,
they would have outclassed Ann
Arbor. The Battle Creek four-
some, who had won the event in
the preliminaries by recording a
new State mark, were edged out
by Jackson in a very close race.
Jackson's time of 1:36.3 rebroke
MAJOR LEAGUE
EXHIBITION SCORES
Philadelphia 6, Detroit 5
New York (N) 9, Chicago (N) 4
Baltimore 8, Cleveland 4
Washington 6, Cincinnati 4
Boston 7, St. Louis 6
New York (A) 6, Milwaukee 5
Pittsburgh 9, Chicago (A) 3
Kansas City 6, Brooklyn 5
ENGINEERING
SENIORS

the State record and enabled Ann
Arbor, whose relay took a close
fifth, to become champions.
Three men proved to be most
instrumental in the Pioneers' win.
Ron Clark swam the 100-yd. or-
thodox breaststroke in a record
time of 1:07.0.
Francis Outstanding
Tee Francis was outstanding as
he took first in the diving event,
and Alex Gaxiola placed second
in the 100-yd. backstroke with a

very respectable time. Alex is the
brother of Wolverines' freshman
diving star, Alvaro Gaxiola, who
placed first in the diving last year
in this high school meet.
Dave Gillanders from Royal Oak
broke the national and State rec-
ords in the 100-yd. breaststroke
by swimming the distance in 57.5
seconds. His teammate, Ralph
Nutter, lowered the state mark in
the 100-yd. backstroke with a time
of 58.8, which placed the Royal
Oak team fourth.

Operation for Burton
An operation will be performed on M. C. Burton's hand to-
day at University hospital.1
The Michigan cage star injured the tendon in the index
finger of his left hand. His condition is not serious and he is
expected to leave the hospital by the end of the week.
Burton injured his hand while going up fora rebound in the
Purdue game. He evidently slammed his hand against the back-
board.
The injury didn't bother Burton's scoring since he got the
majority of his points in the last games of the season.
CONSERVATION- TRAINEES
($4802 to start)
FORESTERS
GEOLOGISTS
WATER CONSERVATIONISTS
GAME BIOLOGISTS
FISH AREA BIOLOGISTS
FISHERIES BIOLOGISTS
Must have graduated by June. File applications by
March 27 listing jobs in which you are interested.
Write to Michigan Civil Service, Lansing 13.

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