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March 20, 1957 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-20

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. MARCH 20.1 F

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAVI MAIWW CO.. 11I'~Y

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GOP Candidates To Appear
At Political 'Town Meeting'

Republican candidates for stateI
office will appear in a "town meet-
ing" political rally at Tappan
Junior High School, March 25 at
8 p.m.
Each candidate will speak brief-
ly and then answer questions from
the audience.
Planning to attend the rally are
George M. Foster, candidate for
Highway Commissioner; Mrs.
Ethel Watt and Alfred B. Con-
nable, University Board of Regents
candidates; Frederick H. Muellez
and Frank Merriman, candidates
for State Board of Agriculture,
governing body of Michigan State
University, and George W. Dean,
State Board of Education candi-
date.
Dr. Edgar Harden, candidate for
State Superintendent of Public
Instruction, will be unable to at-

tend because of commitments in!
the Upper Peninsula on that eve-
ning.
Joseph Hooper, Ann Arbor, sec-
ond district chairman, and Larry
Lindemer, state GOP chairman,
will act as masters of ceremony.1

Local'Republicans, who are host-
ing the second Congressional dis-
trict's Republican candidates, urge'
Democrats and independent voters
to attend the rally.
Refreshments have been planned'
by the Women's City Republican
Club of Ann Arbor and the Ypsi-
lanti City Women's Republican
Club.
Mrs. Dorothy Crisler, president
of the Ann Arbor group, and Mrs.
Betty Weismer, chairman of the
Ypsilanti group, are co-chairmen
of the refreshments committee.

CONTROVERSIAL LAND-Above is the territory Poland may
press the Russiant to give back.
New-Independent Poles
May Ask for Old Lands

DON'T MISS
A THE MERCHANT
OF VENICE
by Shakespeare
Directed by Ted Heusel
March 28-29-30
Dramatic Arts Auditorium
Masonic Temple
Admission $1.50
BOX OFFICE OPENS MARCH 25
Hours: 10-5:30
Phone: 2-5915
presented by
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE

0 LAST DAY *
FSCINATING ADVENTURE
INTO THE UNKNOWNI
THE INCREDIIR
SHRINKING MAN
PLUS e "KELLY AND ME"

By BRACK CURRY
BONN, Germany (P)- Will Po-
land's new "independent" course
change its attitude on the thorny
problem of Germany's eastern
frontier?
There is speculation that the
newly-independent Poles, with
their foot on the ladder to free-
dom, may now press the Russians
to give back some of the Polish
lands absorbed after World War II.
If Moscow agreed, it would bring
about the seventh change in
Poland's geographic position since
its great power days of the 14th to
the 17th centuries.
Three changes came in the 18th
century when Poland, its days of
glory over, was absorbed in 1772,
1793 and 1795 by Prussia, Austria
and Russia.
Retains Name
Poland retained its name, al-
though it was held by Russia from
1795 until after World War I. In
1918 Poland declared its indepen-
dence and this was recognized by
the Treaty of Versailles in Ji;ne.
1919.
As a result of the Treaty, the
Polish borders were expanded
north, east and west, giving the
country almost as much territory
as it held before the 18th century
partitions.
After World War II the Soviet
annexed 69.860 square miles of
sparsely-settled farming land in
eastern Poland and in return some
40,000 square miles of what wask
then Germany was turned over to
Poland-thus moving the Polish
western border to the line formed
by the Oder and Neise Rivers.
Moscow Agreement
Moscow's agreement on return
of some of the eastern land to
Poland might make easier a border
settlement in the west with Ger-
many once this divided nation is
re-united.
But the Polish foreign ministry
evidently is not interested, at the
moment, in any deal with Ger-
many.
The Polish foreign cffice as re-
cently as Feb. 8 assailed West Ger-
many for what it called a "revi-

sionist policy" aimed at getting
back its former eastern provinces.
"The frontier of the Oder-Neisse
is and will remain . . . the inviol-
able frontier of peace in Europe,"
the foreign office said.
But West Germany is committed
to plead for a return of its prov-
inces. And some sources are said
to be campaigning for a thorough
realignment of the Polish frontiers,
east and west.
The present German-Polish
frontier, based on the Oder and
Neisse Rivers, constitutes a major
stumbling block to the framers
of a future German peace treaty.
The West has never accepted the
new Polish boundaries as perman-
ent, pending a final German peace
treaty.
German Provinces
The land gained by Poland's ex-
pansion to the Oder-Neisse line
contained the German provinces
of East Prussia, Pomerania and
Silesia. Upper Silesia was-and is
-one of Europe's richest industrial
centers.
Heavy industry, coal and steel
had made of Silesia a key segment
of German economy before World
War II.
West German leaders are care-
fully encouraging liberal tenden-
cies in Poland to facilitate a peace-
ful settlement of this frontier dis-
pute. There is talk of establishing
diplomatic relations with the
Gomulka regime.
To re-assure the Poles, Foreign
Minister Heinrich von Brentano
has stated publicly that the fron-
tier question "can only be solved
by way of negotiation without the
use, or even the threat, of force."
Brentano stressed that the final
settlement of Germany's frontiers
must be deferred until there is a
freely negotiated peace treaty for
all Germany.
Little Hope
Thus he and other West German
leaders appear to have little hope
of an early change of Poland's
attitude toward the Oder-Neisse
line or of Polish pressure on the
Russians for a revision of their
frontier.
The Poles, for one thing, are
still closely linked to the Soviet
bloc. And Poland is surrounded by
Communist-ruled territory - East
Germany, Czechoslovakia and the
Soviet Union itself.
Clearly reflecting Moscow opin-
ion, Communist East Germany has
just announced that its attitude
on the Oder-Neisse border has not
changed. It called this line the
"lasting and unchangeable peace
border" between Germany and
Poland.

IHC Gives
Recognition
To Scholars
By DONALD KURTZ
Interest in scholarship at the
University is by no means con-
fined to classes or the University
Administration.
In the men's residence halls
scholarship is recognized by a
great variety of awards.
The Inter-House Council's
Scholarship Committee presents
the Roger G. Kidston Scholar-
ship Award. Kidston was the first
president of IHC.
$50 Prize
A prize of $50 goes to the house
in the men's residence halls hav-
ing the highest academic average.
The house then confers the honor
on its most outstanding member.
Awards presented in the men's
residence halls are given for the
most part, on several bases: schol-
arship, activities, citizenship, and
an active interest in the house.
All money from judiciary fines
goes toward an academic fund.
The individual who is to receive
the award is decided upon by the
House Council or a committee of
faculty and students.
Oldest Award
The oldest award in the men's
residence halls, the Donald Joel
Brown Memorial Award, is given
out at West Quad's Honors Din-
ner. The presentation of $100 goes
to the most outstanding student
in Lloyd House.
The fund was established by
parents, family and friends in
memory of the freshman who was
killed while hitch-hiking home
during spring vacation.
Allen Rumsey house in West
Quad gives the Thomas Novak
Memorial Award of $100 for the
"best citizen in the house."
This year an anonymous donor
has given Jack Hale, West Quad's
resident director, $100 for Win-
chell House Citizen's Award.
Freshman Award
In the sprirg of 1956 South
Quad gave each of its houses $50
for a Freshman Scholarship
Award to be awarded to freshmen
who are outstanding in grades,
citizenship, character and partici-
pation. Each house will perpetu-
ate the fund.
The house with the highest
scholastic average receives $50
from the IHC each year.
Slater's Book Store awards $25
in books to the house in South
Quad with the highest scholastic
average. Kelsey House won the
award this year.
Since 1952, Huber House has
given the Vena Haller Memorial
Award to the student most out-
standing in scholarship and citi-
zenship.
Kelsey Award
Each year Gomberg House gives
the Jack Kelsey Memorial Award
of $50 to its most outstanding citi-
zen.
Reeves House gives the W. Wi-
ley Helms Citizenship Award of
$50. It also awards the Charles S.
Clark Scholarship Award plaque,
in memory of the house mother's
husband, to the student with the
highest scholastic average.
Taylor House gives the Fred
Laing award plaque for citizen-
ship, character and activity and
the Jim Davies Award of $50 to
the two outstanding men of Tay-
lor House.
Drake Award
Kelsey House's Robert L. Drake
Award of $50 is based on need and
scholarship. To be eligible for the

award, a boy must be employed
during the school year.
Scholarship funds are raised by
house activities, house dues, fines
and receipts from vending ma-
chines.
Strauss House's five scholar-
ships are the greatest number of-{
fered by any house.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 ,90 2.25 333
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED
STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our busi-
ness. Atlas tires, batteries
and accessories. Warranteed
& guaranteed. See us for
the best price on new tires
-also used tires. Road serv-
ice - mechanic on duty.
Open Mon. through Sat.
7:30 A.M. - 10 P.M.
Sunday 9 A.M. - 8 P.M.
220 So. University NO 8-9168
)S59
For the Best in
Tires, Batteries, and Service
see
"HOB" GAINSLEY
SERVICE
So. University & Forest
)S49
TIRE SALE
Prices slashed
Big trade-in for used tires
Fully Guaranteed
GOLDEN'S SERVICE
featuring STANDARD Products
601 Packard - NO 8-9429
)S52
PERSONAL
SAT. EVE. POST is now available at
a new reduced rate. Student Periodi-
cal-NO 2-3061. )F182.
STEVE SCHWARTZ
for J-Hop" )F167
Elect
JIM GOLD '
Union Student Director
Experience -
Staff man
Information Manager
Spring Parley
)F11
ATTENTION SOPHOMORES: Vote
JOEL KOENIG for J-Hop. )F166
NEW LOCATION MARGARET SHOP-
Uniforms and furs, up to 50% off.
Fur tricks for spring styling. 56 E.
Liberty NO 5-5729. )F142
HELP WANTED
OPENING for 3 well dressed U. of M.
men. Average $50 per week working
evenings and weekends. Car necessary.
See Mr. Hollowell-Room 3K at Un-
ion, Wed., March 20-4 P.M. sharp.
)H104
WANTED-Tutor for Chem. 3. Prefer
teaching fellow. Call after 5 P.M. NO
5-6667. )H102
WANTED-Girl for general office work.
See Miss Walsh. Herb Estes, Ford
Dealer, 505 E. Huron. )H103
BABY SITTER wanted to care for one
child on Tuesdays and Thursdays
from April 1st to June lt. Call NO
8-8995 on Mon.,' Wed., and Fri. be-
fore 5:30. )H101
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part-
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company.
Phone NO 8-9382. )H20
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Women's gold Gruen watch with

{ brown band. Call 205 Prescott, E.Q.
NO 2-4591. )A113

RARE VIOLINS
AND BOWS
ALL ACCESSORIES, STRINGS,
REPAIRS
MADDY MUSIC
508 E. Williams
NO 3-3223

MUSICAL MERCHANDISE,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI FI
BOVAC SPEAKERS
(exclusive dealer of complete line)
AUDIO SUPPLY
LABORATORI ES
334 Nickels Arcade

)X5I etc,

ALTERATIONS
Dressmaking
Tailoring, restyling. Will do fitting in
your home or mine. Experienced,
minimum charges. NO 5-6370.
Pick-up and Delivery
)Ps
DRESSMAKER
Mending - Alterations. Ph. NO 2-9541.
)P1
OONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15
Double-breasted, $18, or new sil
shawl collar, $25. Write to Michaels
Tailoring Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit,
Michigan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. P
PETS & SUPPLIES
BABY TURTLES, hamsters, guinea
pigs, water lizards, parakeets, a.
naries, tropical fish, aquariums and
supplies; plants. Kitty litter, catnip,

MUSIC CENTER has the largest collec-
tion of phono-needles in this area.
Diamond needles $9.95 up.
Bring your Hi Fi problems to us.
MUSIC CENTER
300 S. Thayer
)X9
Hi Fi Studio
Largest inventory of HI FI components
in the area.

UNIVERSITY AQUARIUMI
328 E. Liberty NO 3-02
Open Daily Except Thursday
)TT
ALL COLORS -- baby parakeets and
breeders. Canaries. Baby cockatiel
cages. 305 W. Hoover. NO 2-2403. )T3
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride for 2. Buffalo or vicin-
ity. Leaving March 22, return: March
24. Call Emmie Lou Dias, NO 8-6922.
)032
RENT A CLEAN NEW CAR
Daily, Weekly or Hourly Rates
Reservations made anywhere
Rent A Car
514 E. Washington at.
Phone NO 3-4156

NO 2-7767

IEISW

Authorized
Dyna-Kit
Electro-Voice
Rek-O-Kit
AR-1
Colloro
Pickering
Jim Lansing
Wharfdale

dealer for:.
David Bogen
University
Janzen
Garrard
Fairchild
Fisher
McIntosh
and others

Ask about our payment plans and
package specials.
1217 & 1317 So. University
NO 2-9595 )X3
USED CARS
48 NASH under 50,000 miles. Clean for
its age, overhauled motor, good trans-
portation at $125. 2008 Day St. or
call NO 2-8576. )N106
USED CAR
SPEC IALS
1952 Buick fordor, radio and heater,
Dyna-flow, wonderful condition.
$595
1955 Mercury tudor, black with white
wals, radio and heater. Exception-
ally nice.................$1695
1948 Pontiac convertible, radio and
heater ........................$175
JIM WHITE, Inc.
Your Chevrolet Dealer
Open 'til 9 P.M. Daily, Sat. 'til 1 P.M.
2 Big Lots - Cor. Washington and First
Sts. and Cor. Ashley and Liberty Sts.
Phones NO 2-5000, NO 3-6495, NO 3-3321
)N113
PHOTO SUPPLIES
ARGUS C3
35 mm. Color Slide Camera,
new, regularly $69.50
Now $49.95
with case and flash gun
PURCHASE

TRANSPORTATION: MIAMI - ply
round trip. Leaving April 5, 6 p.m.
plus tax. Will leave on April 5 and
return Sunday, April 14. Call RICHi-
ARD'S TRAVEL AGENCY, NO 2-7414.
FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOMS or single rooms for
girls, twin beds, two closets, com-
munity kitchen. 517 E. Ann St. Phone
NO 2-2826. )C 98
ONE BLOCK from campus. Large 3
room apartment. Also one man to
share apartment with three, same
location. Phone NO 2-1443. )074
REAL ESTATE
THE
BUTTS & SWISHER CO.
REALTORS
FOR ANN ARBOR WOODS
(Washtenaw at Stadium)
Models Open Daily 10-8 }R1
FOR SALE
PIPE SMOKERS
Nature's sweetest Missouri Meer-
schaum pipes. Selected cobs, rub-
ber bits, aluminum cleaners expert-
ly crafted. Regularly $1.00 each.
Three for $2.50 ppd. Mail check to
Ed. Locke, Lac du Flambeau, Wis-
consin. }8)271
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords - $7.25:
socks, 39c; shorts. 69c. military sup-
plies.
SAM'S STORE

NO 2-8425
)Xlo

,.

* Starting

THURSDAY

AN UNBEATABLE COMBINATION !
Director: JOHN FORD
Star: JOHN WAYNE
M-G-M_ __ _¬ęT..wA METROCOLOR
JO0HN WAYNE- DAN DAILEY+ MAUREEN O'HARA
..WARD BOND ,76%

Phone NO 3.0800
122 East Washington

)3206

)3202

CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University

)D75

""",

Single lens reflex
35mm. ASAHIFLEX
f3.5 lensI
speeds %z to 1/1000 $99.50
THE QUARRY, INC.
320 S. State St. NO 3-1991
more than just a camera shop
)D72
WANTED TO RENT
FRESHMAN med student desires apart-
ment for summer session and next
fall. Call NO 3-0521, Ext. 222 after 7
P.M. )L11
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHINGS-Also ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and deli-
very. Phone NO 2-9020. )J23

Read
Daily

/

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""

. ..

41 I Wi
DIAL NO 8-6416
I Evenings at 7 and 9 P.M.

NOMINATED FOR
4 ACADEMY AWARDS

*

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Thursday 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.

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