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March 17, 1957 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, MARCH 17,1957

THE MICHIGAN" DAILY

rAGL SEVEN

SUNDY, ARC 17,957T~l MICIGA DALY PGE EVE

TODAY BELONGS TO THE IRISH:
Kelly Green Shines

Perkins
TJ( Li1L bL

Through American

Hi nlQfnjVT

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Can an Irishman<"
write objectively about the impact
of the Irish on America? Hugh Mulli-
gan, AP writer and direct descendant
of a County Mayo sheepherder, twice
removed, makes the. attempt. As a
s piece of objective journalism, this is
one of the most amusing, informa-
tive and suspect efforts to come down
the St. Pat's Pike since 1866, when
800 Irishmen tried to capture Canada.)
By HUGH A. MULLIGAN
Associated Press Writer
When Christopher Columbus
sailed home after discovering
America, he put an Irishman,
William Ayres of Galway, ashore
at San Domingo to keep an eye
on things until he got back.
Hibernian legen has it that
Bucko Billy pranced up and down
the beach the following March 17,
whistling a bit of a tune to him-
self, and thereby held the first
St. Patrick's Day parade in the
new world.
The early chronicles mention
him-"Guillermo Ihres de Gal-
way in Irlanda"-but fail to sus-
tain the claim that he was both
grand marshal and the entire line
of march in that auspicious but
unidoeumented procession.
"Wisha now, how could he be
first?" A true son of Erin will
dispute the point. "Didn't St.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)

1 - - - -- - - - - - - -

Brendan of Clonfert plant his 1911, all power underground was
brogans here in the sixth century, shut off while his casket mounted
400 years before Leif Erickson and the steps of Manhattan's impres-
more than 1,000 before that there sive St. Patrick's Cathedral, "built
High-talian fellow?" with the pennies of Irish servant
Irish Discovery girls." It is not known in which
Whether the Irish discovered direction the stranded commuters
America or just captured it by prayed his soul's flight.
sheer weight of numbers, there is The Irish-dominated Centra
no denying that they came early Labor Union threatened to dyna-
and often stayed late and long, mite the Brooklyn Bridge -caus
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like ballads around which Irish'
tenors like John McCormack 1
wrapped a fond tonsil.I
Most of all, the Irish loved the I
Catholic Church, a main reason
for their flight to America. Every-
where they went, from the Erie
Canal t the --olfields af (Cal-

never want roast beef for claret" Excavations
to "May the enemies of Ireland
never eat bread nor drink whis- John Ward Perkins, director of
key, but be tormented with itching the British School at Rome, will
without benefit of scratching," and give a public lecture at 4:15 p.m.
one final toast "to our noble Wednesday, in Auditorium B, An-
selves." gell Hall.
By 1803 New York was imposing He will speak on "Excavations
a $10 fine for ridiculing St. Pat- under the Church of St. Peter at
rick "or any other titular saint" Rome."
on his feast day, but in 1888 Mayor His talk will be sponsored by
Abram Hewitt created a political the Department of Fine Arts.
sensation by refusing to review the Ward Perkins has been Director
St. Patrick's Day parade, of the British School at Rome
New York now atones for Hew- since 1947 and Commander, Order

MAY FESTIVAL
SIX CONCERTS MAY 2, 3, 4, 5
Tickets for
SINGLE CONCERTS
now

fornia, they dotted the land with
- church steeples, built schools, hos-
e pitals and orphanages and gladly
contributed thousands of their sons
to the flourishing native clergy
and the far mission fields. Of the
12 Americans named cardinal, 10
have been Irish or born of Irish
parents.
St. Pat's Parade
Boston had a St. Patrick's Day
parade as early as 1737, Philadel-
phia in 1771, Baltimore in 1795,
St Louis in 1810 and San Fran-

ON

SALE

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Academic Notices
English 150 (Playwriting) will meet9
Tuesday, March 19, at 6:55 p.m. ina
Room 1429 Mason Hall.
Mathematics Colloquium: Tues, Mar.1
19, at 4:10 p.m. in Room 3011 AngellR
Hall. Prof. Lars Garding of Lund Uni-
versity, Sweden and the University of
Chicago, will speak on "Hyperbolic Dif-
ferential Equations."
Refreshments will be served at 3:45 int
Room 3212 A.H.S
Placement Notices o
Beginning with Monday, March 18,
the following schools will be at theP
Bureau of Appointments to interview C
for teachers for the 1957-58 school year.t
M on., M arch 1 8r E
Garden City, Michigan-All Elemen-
tary Grades; Science; Commercial; Girls
Physical Education; Elementary Physi-
cal Education Supervisor (man); Visit- C
ing Teacher; Teacher of the EducableC
Mentally Handicapped; Teacher of theC
Blind.b
Tues., March 19 /
Hazel Park, Michigan-All Elemen-
tary Grades; Elementary Art; Music;S
Mentally Handicapped; Visiting Teach-C
er; High School Girls Physical Educa-a
tion; Commercial; Math; Art; Home
Economics; English; Social Studies;
Mentally Handicapped.
Dowagiac, Michigan - Elementary;
English; Social Studies; Science; Math;
Shop; Drawing; Speech Correction.
Hastings, Michigan - Elem. Music;
Home Ec.; Girls Phys. Ed.; Math/Sci-
ence; Social Studies/Eng.; Speech/Eng.
St. Clair Shores, Michigan (Lakeview
School)-Elemetary; Special Education;
Physically Handicapped; Deaf.
Wed., March 20
Battle Creek, Michigan (Harper Creek
Schools)- All Elementary; Librarian;
Biol. Math; Ind Arts; Gen. Sci./Math;
Eng./Social Studies.
Walled Lake, Michigan-Commercial;
Social Studies; Jr. High Math/Eng.;
Girls Physical Education; Social Studies.
Thurs., March 21
Lincoln Park, Michigan-All Fields.
Centerline, Michigan-Kindergarten;
6th grade; Elem. Art; Mentally Re-
tarded; Speech Correction; Junior High
General Studies.
Battle Creek, Michigan-All Fields.
For additional information and ap-
pointments, contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528. Administration Build-
ing, NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
Summer Employmen: Opportunities
for summer employment in work camps
are available with the American Friends
Service Committee. For information and
appointments with Ralph A. Cooper,
College Secretary of the AFCS, please
contact Miss Elden at Lane Hall.
Summer Placement: The following
will be present in Room 3G of the
Michigan Union on Wed., March 20th:
Mr. Hunsilser of Camp Arbitus will
interview for tennis, nature, riflery,
sailing counselors and a nurse.
Rev. Bob Crosby of the Detroi Meth-
odist Church will interview for a nurse,
program director, general counselors,,
waterfront director, nature craft leader,
kitchen help and a maintenance staff
for eight Michigan camps.
Miss Elizabeth Steenssens of Camp
House of the Hill,-in Brighton, will be
present from 1:30 to 4:45 to interview
waterfront and general counselors (fe-
male).
The Ann Arbor YMCA will be present
in the afternoon only.
Miss Janet Hayes of the Jackson
County GirlhScouts will interview
throughout the day.
Mr. Morton Kaufer of Pinecrest
Ranch in Brighton will interview for
general counselors, waterfront director,
and an assistant director.
A representative of Camp Sea Gull
will be present in the afternoon to
interview prospective counselorsa na-
ture specialist in particular is needed.

and made vast and varied contri-
butions to the mainstream of
American culture.
From hod carriers and ditch dig-
gers and simple country school
masters, they and their progeny
rose to become presidents and
generals, cardinals and poets, base-
ball greats and boxing champions,
composers and educators, giants
of industry, journalism, science
and the stage.
"The wheelbarrow was a marvel-
ous invention," said their detrac-
tors. "It taught the Irish how to
walk on their hind legs." But the
path of the wheelbarrow often
led to City Hall, the state house,
and in distant generations to the
White House, as was the case with
Andrew Jackson, James Polk,
James Buchanan, Chester Arthur
and Woodrow Wilson.
The Irish gave a generous green
hue to the stamp of the American
character. The lilt of their lan-
guage brought verve and individu-
ality to the American idiom, their
wit and impudence took the
chill off colonial puritanism, their
love of freedom accounted for
whole sections of the Declaration
of Independence, the Constitution
and the Bill of Rights.
Nearly half a million Irish fled
to America during Cromwell's per-
secutions of the 17th century, an
exodus that continued at the rate
of 20,000 a year until it was esti-
mated that of the three million
people living in the original 13
colonies in 1770, more than one-
third were Irish born or of Irish
descent.
Potato Failure
The failure of successive potato
crops in the 1840s, which Disraeli
called "the single root that
changed the history of the world,"
brought 1,600,000 Irish to Ameri-
ca's shore in a decade, making New
York the largest city in the
country, with twice as many Irish
as Dublin.
When Irish-born subway con-
tractor John B. McDonald died in

its 1883 opening inadvertently was cisco in 1850.
scheduled on Queen Victoria's New York got into
birthday. 1766, when, as the Gaz
An Irish American named Fran-7 ed, the day "was ush
cis Scott Key wrote the "Star dawn with fifes and d
Spangled Banner" while watching wound up late at nigh
an attack on Ft. McHenry, named downing of 20 'toast;
for John McHenry, Washington's from "May the sons
aide-de-camp and later his secre-_from _Maythesns
tary of war.
The Fighting 69th, perhaps the
most famous Irish outfit, was
formed in 1851 as a peacetime mi-
litia company and nearly dis-
banded on the eve of the Civil War
when Michael Corcoran, its dash-
ing young colonel, refused to par-
ade his men in honor of the vis-
iting Prince of Wales.

w. -" - as i

itt's indifference by painting the
road stripe along 5th Avenue a
vivid Kelly green on the night be-
fore the big parade. The police are
still instructed to keep anti-En-
glish banners out of the line of
march, but officers O'Hara, Mo-
naghan and others of like names
always have difficulty laying their
billy sticks on the fellow with the
sign that says "British Murder-
ers," "Make Ireland One" or "En-
gland is called the mother coun-
try because she is always expect-1
ing . . . American dollars."

of the British Empire, since 1955.
Educated at Oxford, he was a
Croven Traveling Fellow from 1934
to 1936, and assistent in the Lon-
don Museum from 1936 to 1938.
A lieutenant colonel in the Royal
Artillery during World War II, he
organized military government an-
tiques department in Tripoli and
Cyrenaica.
He has served as dii ector of
museums and fine arts sub-com-
mission in Italy, and directed arch-
aeological excavations at Welwyn
in 1937; Ightham, Kent,

p.

offices

l

O

MAIN OFFICE
101-107 S. Main St.
NICKELS ARCADE
330 S. State Street
NEAR 'ENGINE ARCH'
1108 South University
PACKARD-BROCKMAN
1923 Packard
WHITMORE LAKE
9571 N. Man St.

serve

DR. KENNETH PIKE
of the Anthropology Department
lectures on

you

Fighting 69 Wins
Nicknamed by Robert E. Lee, the,
Fighting 69th has since fought in
every major American war, win-
ning 23 battle streamers, seven
medals of honor and a permanent
place in history for names like
Corcoran and Thomas Meagher,
Father Duffy and Joyce Kilmer.

"IS SINCERITY ENOUGH?"

SUNDAY, MARCH 17

41: 00P.MN.

at LANE HALL

At sea in America's wars have
been Commodore John Barry, fa- Sponsored by Michigan Christian Fellowship
ther of the U.S. Navy; Stephen
Decatur; Oliver Perry; the Civil
War gunboat USS Shramrock, Ad--- --- --_ -_----
mirals Alfred Mahan and William
Leahy; the five Sullivans; and
among many others, John Philip POST PARTY FREE TRANSPORTATION
Holland, who invented the sub-T
marine in hopes of finding a
British fleet.
quick way to blow up the entire! To Complete Your Spring Social ualendar
William Mooney, a New York
upholsterer, founded Tammany l See
Hall in 179, two weeks after the
establishment of the national gov-
ernment. NIE Z P PIL
Dublin-born James Hoban de-
signed the White House, modeling (SPECIAL 10th ANNIVERSARY SHOW)
it after the Duke of Leinster's
home in his native city.
Besides sports and politics, the Saturday, March 23 8:00 P.M.
Irish loved a song, and the sadder
the better. But, alas, no Irishment at Ann Arbor High School
ever wrote "When Irish Eyes Are
Smiling," "I'll take You Home TICKETS $1 .75 ON SALE in MASON HALL
Again Kathleen," "Mother Ma-
chree," "Kathleen Mavoureen" and

$1.50, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Memorial Tower

CAR FINANCING
You can finance at the lowe
_ krates you'll find anywhere
L Ann Arbor Bank. You'll fin
too, that there's a minimum
red tape and delay. Why n
drop in - today.
....:
....:B N K "
: t".~iv,::3L":'.. :...: +R nB ' L. -.,. .r..Gi'&

st
at
d,
of
lot.

A

en in the kn ow
know true from false ,

I-

i Y

LOVE THAT BOOKSHOP

NORTH AMERICAN HAS BUILT MORE AIRPLANES THAN ANY OTHER COMPANY IN THE WORLD

-Bob Marshall s

T-28 Worthy successor to the world famous AT-6

r
iG ' n-.;per
E x
}y
B-45 America's first four engine jet bomber

,yh

More than 50% of college men
earn at least half their way
through school
TRUE ZFALSE
False. While 71% earn part or all of
their expenses, the breakdown is:
17% earn nothing; 25% earn less
than 1; 20% earn 4 to /2; 14%
earn 1/2 to 34; 24% earn to all.

G

____________________________________________________________________ C.

F-86 The Sabre Jet that turned the tide in the Korean War

F-86D America's first all-weather, one-man interceptor

.*N
-P

College men usually marry
college women
1TRUE L FALSE
False. They might like to, but there
are just so many more college men
than college women that they can't.
However, it is true that college girls
usually marry college men.

Ii

____________________________________________________________________ ~1

F-100 America's first operational supersonic fighter

'. 'C

The vital part of Jockey
underwear lasts longer than
the rest of the garment
E12 TRUE [ FALSE
True. The waistband is usually the
weak point of most underwear, but
Jockey developed a special, long-
wearing, heat-resistant elastic (with
U.S. Rubber and the American In-
stitute of Laundering) that actually
outwears the garment itself.

Engineers, scientists, physicists, mathematicians...
LIKE TO HELP WITH THE NEXT ONE?
The North American airplanes of the engineers and to specialists in other sci-
future will come from the creative poten- ences. If you want to work on advanced
tial of today's young men. Possibly you- projects right from the start ...enjoy rec-
or members of your graduating class- ognition and personal rewards...live
will help to engineer them. One thing is and work in Southern California...then
certain. They will have to be the best to join North American's outstanding engi-
merit the space reserved alongside the neering team.
famous North American planes pictured See your Placement Officer today to
in tbic qd- arranae for an annointment witih North

Men on the go
go for Jockelunderwear
BRAN D
made only by

f

7l_.

(te
BROWN
2e~taupri

JUG

oft

i

C

I

I

4

11

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