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March 12, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, MARCH 12,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 1957 THE MTCHI(~A1~T flAITY - * ,',w ~

YALE FI* zVE

9

Hungarian Woman Relates 'CRIMSON CAROUSEL':
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Reveals A-Ball Theme

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SENIOR NIGHT-when senior coeds get together for a good time.

Senior Night Festivities To Mark
S55th Annual Wornmen's Gathering

By NANCY VERMULLEN
"I love America, but I can't get
used to the bright lights of the
city; they give me a headache!"
Combining old world charm
with American friendliness, Ethel
Csoioss, a Hungarian coed, told
of her experiences since arriving
in Ann Arbor three months ago.
Sponsored by Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Ilich of Ann Arbor, Mrs.
Csomoss came to this country
with her young son, Zoltan, on
Friday, Dec. 14. "I'll never forget
that day," she said. "I hadn't seen
my mother for twelve years."
Lives Wtih Mother
The petite, brown-haired coed
is now living wi7th her mother,
brother, and son on Sybil Street.
Most of her time is spent trying
to learn the English language, so
she spends four hours a day at-
tending classes in the English
Language Institute.
Mrs. Csomoss changed from her
American skirt, sweater, and neck
scarf into a Hungarian square
dance costume. "In Hungary I
studied dancing," she explained..
"Now I am going to dance in a
program here at the Amphi-
theatre on Friday, March 15, and
I'm so excited."
"Of course, I miss my friends in
Hungary," she went on, "but I've
made so many new friends here.
Once a week we get together with
other Hungarian people to play
cards and drink tea."
Loves American Clothes
When asked what intrigued her
most about America, Mrs. Csom-
oss clapped her hands and ex-
claimed, "The clothes! In Hun-
gary we couldn't wear evening
dresses, even to balls."
Smiling, the coed confided that
she would like to become a dance
teacher. "In Hungary I was a
grammar school teacher, but of
course I couldn't do that here be-
cause my English is so poor." Her
mother and she earn money now
by taking in sewing at home.
When asked how she liked Am-

erican food. Mrs. Csomoss smiledj
sheepishly. "I haven't been brave
enough to try it," she said. "I al-
ways eat at home."
SOPH SHOW - A meeting for
all sophomores interested in pe-
titioning for Soph Show will be
held at 7:30 p.m. tonight in the
League.
FROSH WEEKEND - Frosh
Weekend mass meeting will be
held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the
League.
* * *
SCROLL - Petitions for the
scholarship offered by Scroll, se-
nior women's honorary, are due
Monday, March 18. Appointments
for interviews on Tuesday and
Wednesday, March 19 and 20
should be made.
* * *
STUDENTS - The Student Na-
tional Education Association will
hold its third meeting of the se-
mester at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in
the University elementary school
cafeteria.
Two films, "Freedom to Teach"
and "Who Will Teach Your
Child?" will be featured.

Assembly's annual dance will be
held from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Satur-
day, in the League Ballroom.
Decorations for the coed bid
dance, sponsored by the indepen-
dent women on campus, will be
c e n t e r e d around the theme,
"Crimson Carousel."-

N

years, several of the women's
mitories are holding coketail
ties before Assembly Ball.
General chairman of thise
is Elsie Scherer. Diane Cha

dor-
par-
event
adsey

As has been done in previous

1

Providing the dance music will
be Don Kenney and Bob Duprey.
For couples desiring to dance the
faster numbers, there will be spe-
cial music provided in another
room.
The concourse of the second
floor of the League is being trans-
formed into a carousel, complete
with animals and a tent-like top.
Silhouettes of circus animals will
adorn the walls of the ballroom. A
big clown's face will greet coeds
and their dates at the entrance to
the dance.
A "Patron's Parlour" and a
"Kiddie Korner" will be available
for those who tire of dancing and
wish to relax.
It is requested by the patrons
committee that no flowers be
worn to this semi-formal affair.
Assembly Association, organi-
zation of independent women, has
extended an invitation to all af-
filiated women on campus who
may desire to attend the dance.
During the war years, the event
was sponsored jointly by Assem-
bly Association and Panhellenic
Association.

____

JUNIOR CLASS of Dental School
presents
23rd ANNUAL ODONTO BALL
featuring Red Johnson
MICHIGAN UNION BALL ROOM
MARCH 16 . . . 9 TILL 1
- - - - -- - - - -

t

is handling the publicity for the
affair while Mary Lou Anteau
takes charge of ticket sales.
Other chairmen include Fran-
ces Moran, in charge of bands and
finance and Jan O Brien, in
charge of programs and patrons.

ii

IF

By ROSE PERLBERG
In a little more than a week,
senior coeds will gather to partici-
pate in one of the oldest continu-
ous women's traditions on cam-
pus.
For the 55th consecutive time,
annual Senior Night festivities are
scheduled for Thursday evening,
March 21.
Sororities Follow
Contact Measures
Throughout Week
Contact rules have been in ef-
f feet since yesterday and will con-
tinue through Sunday, March 17,
while sororities make their final
decisions for Spring Bid Day,
Sunday, March 17.
Spring Bid Day is an opportu-
nity for sororities to replace unex-
pected losses incurred during the
fall semester due to illness and
transferring of active members.
While contact rules are it ef-
fect, there will be no visiting or
communication between indepen-
dents and affiliated women, other
than a friendly hello, if they
should meet on campus.

Senior women will meet at the
steps of the general library, and
march to the League, where din-
nef in the ballroom and a series
of pranks and traditions await
them.
Typical of the rites that have
stood through the years is the
marriage status ceremony. Coeds
are divided 'into four categories:
married women carry candles, en-
gaged suck on lemons, pinned co-
eds replace fraternity emblems
with a safety pin while the unat-
tached carry pennies, one for each
year of their age, to toss into a
wishing well.
Traditionally, s e n i o r s also
watch the first performance of
Junior Girls Play, as honored
guests. The performance is opened
to the rest of the campus on fol-
lowing days.
Senior Night, formerly called
Senior Supper, and JGP have
been established as "just fun"
campus institutions since the turn
of the century, remarks League
Social Director Ethel A. McCor-
mick.
A faithful frequenter of Senior
Night functions, Miss "Mac" nev-
er misses a dinner and play. Os-
tensibly she goes "to see if JGP is
as good as before," but she admits
that she enjoys as much "the

friendly spirit and just plain
good time" the coeds have.
When asked which JGP play
she thinks was best the spry di-
rector's eyes twinkle and she in-
variably quips: "It might be as
good and it isn't any better."
Before 1936 when the League
started to house Senior Night ac-
tivities, senior women met at Bet-
sy Barbour for a Senior Supper. It
became Senior Night in 1949 and
the name has stuck ever since.
Senior Night attendance has
swelled with the increasing years;
Miss Mac adds. The affair, she
continues, is much less formal
than the days when black garbed
seniors marched solemnly from
Betsy Barbour to Waterman Gym.
The cap and gown custom was
discontinued in 1952.

Fashion News
tha goes to
your head ....
Choose from Brettons, ClochesDomes,
Sailors, Clip-ons, Tailored, Beribboned
and Beflowered
Budget from $3.95 hats
BETTER HATS to $16.95
soe vewith bags to match.
Fe S U e
on forest Off South University =
::V{.:"'::4": :': :"::"':":'4:?.4 : ?t,,"tT..""::t.N.4... :" ".1..:.4"::"

LOW COST ATC TOURS
BeContinental..
GO "A'EUROPEAN
1. DRIVE YOURSELF, Plan own 50 day trip. Car, ho-
tels, meals, ship passage. Price each if 4 in party.
$800
2. 11 COUNTRIES-60 DAYS. Holland, Belgium, Ger-
many, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, England, France,
etc. $898$
3. 9 COUNTRIES--71 DAYS. The Hague, Bonn, Lu-
cerne, Milan, Rome, Venice, Naples, Cannes, Paris,
London. $1085*
4. NORDIC TOUR-55 DAYS. 10 countries including
the Arctic Circle Region, Lapland, France, England.
$1160*
5. 14 COUNTRIES-71 DAYS, London, Oslo, Bonn, Vi-
enna, Venice, Rome, Grace Kelly Land, Bourges,
Paris, etc. $1185*
6. 8 COUNTRIES-73 DAYS. Holland, Germany, Aus-
tria, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, France, England.
$1090
7. BIKE TOUR-73 DAYS. 8 Countries, trains & buses
in mountains. $1065*
*Transportation (Ship, train, etc.) hotel, meals, tips, etc.
Call: Marna Heizelman, Delta Gammna
NO 2-2543 after 7:00 P.M.

_I

"Collelate Hospitalit"
YOUR 1957 SUMMER TOUR OF
Have fun in England, Holland, Germany, Austria, Italy, France,
Switzerland, Belgium. 59-day co-ed tour for college people only.
$973, complete cost. Escorted by Mr. and Mrs. Jean M. Leblon.
Sail on student ship "Groote Beer" June 19. Ask now for full details!

Discover now how your abilities will lit
into the ever-expanding communica-
tions industry when you're ready to start
your business career.
For a personal appraisal of your future
prospects in this vital industry, call or
visit your Placement Counselor now
and arrange an interview with our repre-
sentatives. They'll be on campus soon
to talk with-
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SENIOR MEN
interested in

11

1

I

Public Contact Work
Personnel
Writing

Management
Technical Fields
Accounting

USED BOOKS-

MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY

-Bob Marshall's

-
F, ----__

I f -

t'
6 tI
6- °
1: y .u

WHAT IS DISCOUNT DISCUSSION#
EDWIN JOYCE, JR., Bargain Jargon
BUTLER U.
WHAT IS A NAIL-STREWN CROSSROADS #
DAN LOPEZ. Puncture
RYAN PREPARATORY COLL. Juncture
WHAT IS AN AMBULANCE ATTENDANTI
VRENE ALLEN. Stretcher Fetcher
BRADLEY

WIAT
TRY THIS: put a pack of Luckies on a pedestal-under glass.
Observe closely for several days. What happens? Not a
thing. You've just learned the hard way that an unsmoked
Lucky is simply Waste Taste! Light it, and it's simply
wonderful. You see, a Lucky is made better to taste better.
It's packed end to end with fine tobacco...
mild, good-tasting tobacco that's TOASTED
to taste even better. Don't just wait around-
light up a Lucky. You'll say it's the best-
tasting cigarette you ever smoked! R TK't'

WHAT IS A WEALTHY BIRD?
SANDRA BERNSTEIN. Plush luzh
WHAT IS A PNT-SIZED GHOST9
ROSE DE WoVF. Bantam Phantom
TEMPLE U
WHAT IS A RADIO THAT RUNS ALL NIGHTS
Tireless Wireless
EMORY DUNTO.
GEORGIA TECH.

DON'T JUST STAND THERE ...
STICKLE!'
MAKE $25
Sticklers are simple riddles with
two-word rhyming answers. Both
words must have the same number
of syllables. (No drawings, please!)
We'll shell out $25 for all we use-
and for hundreds that never see
print. So send stacks of 'em with
your name, address, college and
class to Happy-Joe-Lucky, Box
67A, Mount Vernon, N. Y.

C I G A R E T T E S

WHAT IS AN ABSENT.MINDED MOTORIST#

WHAT MAKES SHEEP RUNE
; , 1 -- .1

I

I s

I

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