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March 12, 1957 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-12

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k
'VUESDAY, MARCH 12,1957

THE 1111CHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIREE

TUESDAY, MARCH 12,1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DREAM AUTOMOBILE:
Experimental Car Used by Engineers

City News Roundup

II

By RONALD SCHELKOPF
A gift of a $100,000 experimental
automobile to the University will
be used in providing incentive for
future Automotive Engineers, Prof.
William H. Graves, director of the
Automotive Engineering Labora-
tories explained. r ?
The XM 800, a dream car de-
signed by the Mercury division of
Ford Motor Company in 1954, was
recently presented to the North
Campus auto engineers.
Low-slung, 55/2-inch-high car
has toured the Auto Shows
throughout the country since 1954,
in personifying future trends of
the industry. The XM 800 sits one
inch lower than present-day mod-
els of the same manufacturer.
Same Wheelbase
The 1954 car's wheelbase is
about the same as 1957 models,
Prof. Graves pointed out, but has
a slightly smaller overall length
of 207 inches.
The creme-colored, sleek, hard
top coupe has a ground clearance
of seven inches.
The director of the Automotive
Laboratories describes the car as
"rather severe in its treatment of
things."
Hegoes on to explain that the
car achieves its beauty through
simplicity of lines and without
benefit of chrome on its sides.
The car's distinctive front has
its parking light built into and
on the under side of the front
bumper. Its thin, sweeping fin
styling on the rear fenders pre-
empted today's huge, flaring fins.
Perhaps the most futuristic of
Police Search
Theaters
For Escapee
Ann Arbor Police and Wash-
tenaw County Sheriff's Deputies
checked the State and Michigan
Theaters Sunday night looking for
Carl Sattler, a walk-away escapee
from the county jail.
Sattler left the jail Sunday eve-
ning with a group of prisoners
serving weekend sentences. He was
apprehended late Sunday night by
Ann Arbor Police Officers Walter
Hawkins and Donald Ing.
The theaters were searched
about 9:45 p.m. after a cab driver
and a woman selling candy at the
State reported having seen Sattler
enter the theater.
The State theater manager, Ger-
ald Hoag, reported that there was
no disturbance and the officers
were in the theater only a few
minutes.
Sattler went to his parents'
home after walking out of the jail.
His brother, Emil Sattler, told
police that his parents were appar-
ently afraid of Carl and that was
why they had not called to
police.
After checking the theaters, Offi-
cers Hawkins and Ing searched the
neighborhood and noticed a car
in the driveway of Sattler's home.
They waited until Sattler and his
brother got into the car and stop-
ped them a few blocks from his
house.
Sattler had been in county jail
on a drunk and disorderly charge
and for violating probation when
he escaped.
After talking to his brother,
Sattler decided to give himself up.
He and his brother were on the
way back to the county jail when
they were picked up by the Ann
Arbor Police.
French Film
To Be Shown
"Rendez-vous de Juillet," a
French film directed by Jacques

Becker will be shown 8 p.m. to-
morrow at the Kellogg Auditorium.
The movie, which has English
subtitles, is one of the thi'ee French
films being sponsored by Le Cercle
Francais.
Admission is free for members
and membership can be obtained
at the door.

Samuel J. Eldersveld, Democ-I
ratic mayorality candidate, today!
criticized the "propaganda" usedl
by Republican Mayor William E.
Brown, jr. in recent campaign
comments.
"Ann Arbor's government isl
built on the old American conceptI
of government by a citizen-mayorl
and a citizen-council," Eldersveld!
declared. "Mayor Brown had mis-
construed this principle and our
practice, and suggests that only a
rich man can be an effective may-
or for Ann Arbor."
The mayor remarked that he
has spent thousands of dollars of
his own money in serving as may-
or as well as devoting 80 per cent
of his time to city affairs.
Eldersveld said that "nomina-
tions for mayor and for City
Council have never been made on!
a basis of wealth, but on ability
and willingness to serve."
Eldersveld feels that Ann Arbor
does not expect its mayor or coun-
cilmen to give up their normal oc-
cupations or will not elect only
someone who is independently
wealthy.
"I am convinced that the voters
do not believe this 'rich man may-
or' propaganda," he remarked.

Flu Attack
Slauson Junior High is still feel-
ing the attack of an apparent flu-
type virus that has affected more
than 300 students since last
Thursday, school authorities re-
ported today.
Slauson principal, Harold M. Lo-
gan, said 294 students have been
reported absent from classes to-
day. The normal absenteeism for
Slauson is somewhat less*than 80.
Dr. Otto K. Engelke, director of
the City-County Health Depart-
ment, said that limited throat
cultures have been taken and are
being put through laboratory
studies at the University. From all
reports, the outbreak appears to
be a mild flu-type virus, Dr. En-
gelke said.
School authorities became aware
of the outbreak Thursday when
130 pupils remained home. Dur-
ing the day, at least 120 more were
sent home while at least 80 more
were affected Friday.
The general symptoms consisted
of high temperatures, sore throats
and body weakness. About one-
third of the school's 988 students
experiencd these symptoms.

I

U

-Daily-David Arnold
X800-A "candid back" accentuates the rear of this experimental car. The car radio aerial is mounted
atop the button-operated trunk "deck." The simulated license plate covers the opening to the gas tank.

the car's lines form the square,
simple "candid" back of the car.
The steel and fiberglass-con-
structed body houses a 312 cubic
inch engine capable of 255 h.p.
Eighteen Months To Design
The car, styled by William
Schmidt of Mercury, was 18
months in designing. Other of its
features, now commonplace, are
power steering and brakes, padded
dash, safety belts, and door locks.
As one opens the car's doors, he,
grasps thin door handles contoured
to fit the fingers. Inside, the viewer
is greeted by a "bucket seat" styl-
ing which is not yet incorporated
in present-day models. Both back'
and front seats are split in half
to make four individual seats
rather than the traditional two.
The interior is fitted in leather,
copper and white colored uphol-
stery.
Between both the front and back
sectioned seats are compact control
boxes of switches that activate the
power windows. Other buttons
control "fore" and "aft" seat
movements. The front sections, in
addition have a button which en-
ables the seat to assume a reclin-
ing position.
New Pushbutton
Another innovation in push-but-
ton features finds the hood and
"deck," or trunk, being raised by
"automatic lifts" at the flick of a
switch on the dash board.
The car is equipped with a 130
m.p.h. speedometer, and Prof.
Graves estimates that speeds of

120 m.p.h. are at least possible.
Another feature on the dash board
is a "tachometer," an instrument
that tells the driver how fast his
engine is going in revolutions per
minute.
Prof. Graves sees the dream
automobile's chief value as a work-
ing model of the problems involved
in automotive engineering. Stu-
dents will be able to criticize the
styling as well as to praise its good
points, he surmised.
Build Enthusiasm
The $100,000 experiment will also
serve "to build up the enthusiasm
of engineers and show them what
they will be faced with" in indus-
try, %he silvery-haired engineer
says.
The Automobile. Laboratories
director points out that it is "al-
ways a real problem between en-
gineers and stylists to give the
public what it wants."
Music Forum
Will Be Held
A composer's forum, featuring
works by four University students
and a contemporary German com-
poser, will be held at 8:30 p.m.
Friday in Auditorium A of Angell
Hall.
Following the musical program,
which is open to the general pub-
lic, will be a discussion of the com-
positions.

Another problem which Prof.
Graves would like to solve is that
of acquainting students with his
new North Campus $1,850,000 Au-
tomotive Engineering Laboratory
Building.
The engineer "wants to get stu-
dents to know what equipment we
have over here." He hopes to bring
the XM 800 on the campus in the
spring so that students may per-
haps become interested enough to
come to the North Campus to see
for themselves.
The experimental car will then
serve the double purpose of edu-
cating engineers in their field and
educating the public in the many
interesting pieces of equipment
housed in the Automotive Labora-
tories.

I

mI

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WIT H T HE E LECT RONICS DIVISION OF . :
Please contact your Placement Director
today to arrange for interviews with
General Motors recruiting representative
who will be on the campus
MARCH 12

Mak 6ds owAwwtk!
VOW
smommm Pliallow T o N mm Im
q§smmw I

is the word - for flavor I

IN

nd l

STUDENT BIKE SHOP is entirely
owned and operated by students.
(fat ones, tall ones, skinny ones, small ones)
ESPECIALLY FOR STUDENTS
Our service is as good as the quality
of niirhiL r %/ - , v- nv

I

1I



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