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February 24, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, BRUARRY 24,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SNAE UAY4197HI-aN - ATL.

PAGE THIU

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER:
Drishell Displays Dramatic Sensitivity
By ALLAN STILLWAGON

Education Is More Than
Learning From Books'

Dramatic Arts Center actor
Ralph Drishell is not an easy man
to caricature.
The dramatic sensitivity which
has delighted local audiences
through his work here seems to be
attended by a shyness directly con-
tradicting the leading-man's on-
stage vitality.
"Ralph is still young, and waits
to be channeled by his director
before turning on the power," one
of his DAC colleagues suggested.
'r "Perhaps he is less articulate off-
stage because of the loss of outside
direction."
Gisterak Directs
But, fortunately for his career,
direction when needed is supplied
by Joseph Gisterak, DAC director
since its inception three years ago.
Significantly, the most successful
presentation of this season was a
French comedy (usually dangerous
material for even Broadway pro-
duction) in which Drishell as "To-
paze" was timid and overwhelm-
ingly respectful.
But his quiet surface does not
suggest shallowness, for when
Drishell does talk, he reveals a
,carefully considered view of his
ti art.
"I think that in any endeavor,
theater or anything else," he re-
flected, "a person will do his best
in proportion to his personal .in-
sight."
Profound Awareness
We must have profound aware-
ness of ourselves every moment, he
insists. "I try to spend much of the
time growing in the concept of
knowing myself ... thinking about
my thinking."
y He is solidly convinced of the
ability of the individual. "Ulti-
mately what one does is based
purely on himself . no matter
what the circumstances may be."
Drishell took a piece of' straw
from the jar of weeds that towers
behind his living-room davenport.
-Ie broke it several times and con-
tinued:
"What about the people in slave
camps? They still control things,
merely in a different, a more
limited way."
'Self-Control'
This "self-control" seems to have
played a positive part in the actor's
career. Born and raised in Long
Island, Drishell graduated from
high school and chose to join the
Air Force rather than be drafted
into the Army.
After leaving the service he at-
tended Cargenie Tech. in Pitts-
burgh, Pa., studying drama from
a "strictly practical angle, with all
but one academic subject dealing
with the theater."
Between graduation and DAC
affiliation, he spent four summers
(1953 to 1956) working with the
Antioch Shakepearian Festival.
When the snows came, he served

By ROBERTA FINKEL
"There is more to getting an
education that just learning from
books," according to Martin David,I
director of the Institutional Ser-
vice Work Camp,
Learning about ' people with
backgrounds different from our
own is an important aspect of
everyone's education, he main-
tains.
The Institutional Service Work
Camp, sponsored by the American
Friends Service Committee is a
group which is trying to do just
that.
Consisting of University stu-
dents, the group co-operates with
the Sophie Wright Settlement
House in Detroit. They try to pro-
mote better understanding among
members of the community, while
they increase their own under-
standing of their fellow men.
Weekend in Detroit
The students spend a weekend
in Detroit, living at the settlement
house and working at the homes
of needy families in the area.
Painting and cleaning these
homes are among the projects un-
dertaken by the work camp, usu-
ally with the entire family join-
ing in.
Friday evening, when the stu-
dents arrive in Detroit, they meet
with a -member of the settlement
house who tells them about the
particular family they will be
working with the following day.
Work begins on Saturday morn-
ing and is usually completed by

the evening. Saturday night is de-
voted to recreation for the group.
Sunday Evaluation
Evaluation of the previous day's
work is done on Sunday. The stu-
dents discuss what they think can
be done for the community, and
how better understanding of other
people can be brought about. They
also visit one of the churches in
the neighborhood, meeting more
people.I
The work camp has already had
three successful projects this year,
and is planning at least two more,
on March 1-3, and April 22-24.
Any students interested in promot-
ing brotherhood by working with
this group can contact David for
more information.
Ir- summing up the purpose of
the work camp, David commented,
"We feel it is an important part of
education for students to under-
stand their fellow men.
"It is an interesting and re-
warding experience to work and
talk with these people, both at the
settlement house and in the
homes."

r

---

BURTON HOLMES
TRAVELOGUE S

RALPH DRISHELL-"If people would stop and listen to them-
selves, they would be surprised at what they hear. We talk too
much, most of what we say could go better unsaid. My favorite
line is, "I wouldn't mind speaking if it weren't for the words."

11

%;

the World Stage group in Detroit,
where Joseph Gisterak directed be-
fore coming to Ann Arbor.
Suspension of the Center's pro-
fessional program leaves the im-
mediate fiture undefined, but,
couched in idealism, his long range
view is clear.
"I want to work in plays that
have substance. That's one of the
reasons I came here, to speak
through the playsr that say what
I have to say."
C. Lindstrom
To Talk HereI

Organization Notices

February 24, 1957
United Jewish Appeal (Hillel), meet-
ing of all those interested in working
on campaign, Feb. 24 and Feb. 26, 7:30
p.in., Hillel Library.
* * It
Unitarian Student Group, Feb. 24,
7:00 p.m. 1st Unitarian Church, Dr. Ko-
vasci -Hungarian refugee, "Democra-
cy in Action." Transportation, 6:45 at
Stockwell and the Union,
* , ,
Deutscher Verein, meeting, Feb. 25,
7:30 p.m., Union room 3G. Drama by
the faculty.
* * * -

Carl Lindstrom, executive edi- Graduater utingFCleubHng an
tor of The Hartford Times, will Supper, Feb. 24, 2 p.m., Rackham.
speak tomorrow at 3 p.m. in Rack- U * M
ham Amphitheatre in a University University of Michigan Folk Dancers,
Lecture in Journalism. members welcome, Feb. 25, 7:30-10:00
His topic will be "The Scientific p.m., Lane Hall.
Approach in Journalism." *
Lindstrom has served the Times Russian Circle, Feb. 25, 8 pam., In-
in various capacities for the past ternational Center.
38 years. He is director and treas- * * *
urer of the American Society of Young Republicans, "The Hungarian
Revolt," Feb. 26, 7:30 p.m., Union room
Newspaper Editors and has served 3A
as Chairman of the Society's Ad- * * *
visory Committee. Michigan Christian Fellowship, Feb.

r',
1
I

24, 4:00 p.m., Lane Hall. Dr. Brian Mill-
ward, "Facts to Faith."
s * s
Hillel Players, meeting, tryouts to be
held, Feb. 24, 3:30 p.m., Hillel.
Lutheran Student Association. Feb.
24, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Student Center,
supper and Martin Luther film.
* 9 4
Lutheran Student Association, Feb.
25, 8:00 p.m., Lutheran Student Center,
Dr. Mendenhall-Lectures on the Old
Testament.
* . *
Westminster Student Fellowship, Feb.
24, 10:30 a.m., Co-op Lounge, study of
Student Movement Merger. 5:00 p.m.,
W.S.F. supper, Lewis room. 7:00 p.m.,
Vesper Service, Sanctuary. 8:00 p.m.,
Seminar discussion, "Must we say God
Is Three-in-one?"
Red taup0aftt
1204 South University
SPAGHETTI
AND MEALS
OUkt SPECIALTY

FEB. 23
ROBERT MALLETT
Narrates
CRUISE TO RIO
The Andes - Amazon
Jungles - Modern Cities
of Peru and Brazil
MARCH 14

OPENING
THURS. NIGHT
FIVE THURSDAY
EVENINGS - 8:30 P.M.
FILMED ON FOUR CONTINENTS
MOTION PICTURES
IN NATURAL COLOR

MARCH 7
ROBERT MALLETT
Narrates
FLIGHT TO
SWEDEN
Via North Pole to Stockholm
Swedish People
Customs
MARCH 21
THAYER SOULE
Narrates
THE OLD SOUTH
Washington - Smoky
Mountains - Williamsburg
Natchez - New Orleans

ROBERT MALLETT
Narrates
TODAY'S JAPAN
Festivals - Shrines
Gardens - Temples
Fujiyama - Tokyo

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MARCH 28

SUBSCRIPTION 'PRICE

THAYER SOULE
Narrates

SINGLE ADMISSIONS:

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