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February 23, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 23. 1957

Old Colonial
Newspapers
On Exhibit
By JAN WILCZEWSKI
If a person ever feels he doesn't
appreciate the newspapers of to-
day, he might do well to attend
the Colonial Newspaper Exhibit
at Clements Library.
During February, a display of
newspapers dating before the Civil
War and the invention of modern
Roman type is being featured.
The library's copy of the Penn-
sylvania Mercury, dated April 21,
1775, was printed from the first
types cast in commercial quanti-
ties in the United States. Ger-
mantown printers produced type
as early as 1772.
The purpose of the exhibition
is to show the difference in ap-
pearance and make-up of colonial
newspapers from those of current
times.

ISOTOPES TO IMPROVE HEALTH:
Atom Used in Botanical Research

High Literary Content
Typical of the eighteenth cen-
tury newspapers are few head-
lines and high literary content.
Essays 50 and 100 years old are
found on the first and fourth
pages.
Important news is displayed on
the inside pages, contrary to pres-
ent journalistic practice.
Editorials were infrequent;
there was little display advertis-
ing, although numerous classified
ads were scattered throughout the
pages.
Original Prints
The exhibit includes both ori-
ginal prints and copies of the co-
lonial material.
An original print of a 'Virginia
Gazette shows a plan of the battle
a. Culloden. 8 3.1aus no engraver
was available, the plan is com-
posed entirely of figures made
from printer's devices.
A copy of the New Hampshire
Gazette which uses a black border
in an issue protesting the Stamp
Act is also in the collection.
'The libi ary has in its coloiial
newspaper collection over 3,000
bound volumes. The current ex-
hibition is a sample of the total
assemblage.
rgaizaion
[ Notices I

-Daily-David Arnold
HELPFUL HINTS-Rushees receive advice on fraternities and
rushing procedures at the IFC-sponsored counseling service in the
Union.
IFC offers Special Program
Of Rushing Period Counseling

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
eighth in a series of articles concern-
ing the atom, atomic energy, its
utilization and the important scien-
tists who contributed to the ad-
vancement of the Atomic Age.)
By GERALD LUNDY
Scientists in countries the world
over' are now devoting their time
and efforts in research involving
the use of radioisotopes in attempts
to improve and increase health
and welfare in the world.
At the University much of this
work is being carried on in ap-
proximately 40 research projects
involved in the use of radioactive
materials.
In one particularly important
project sponsored by the United
States Atomic Energy Commission,
the Kresge Institute of Medical
Research is contributing much toj
man's struggle against the diseases
that plague him most.
Four-year Contract
The Institute is currently under
a four-year contract with the AEC
to evaluate different types of
atomic radiation which will re-
place the use of costly X-rays in
the treatment of cancerous
growths.
If this project proves success-
ful, it is presumed that the cost
of treating cancer and similar ill-
nesses will be considerably de-
creased.
The main isotope currently being
tested in the radiology department
of the Institute is Cesium 137, an
atomic reactor by-product which
the AEC is easily able to supply.
Plant Research'
Other experiments being con-
ducted in the University are with
the use of radioactive materials in
plant research.
Prof. Felix G. Gustafson of the
botany department has conducted
experiments with several radio-
active isotopes, including those of
cobalt, iron, zinc, and carbon. .
Using these isotopes as radio-
active tracers, Prof. Gustafson has
observed with the aid of the Geiger
counter, the rapidity of plant ab-
sorption and the the distribution
of liquids and minerals.
Absorption of Plant Foods
His research has also demon-
strated that plant-foods can

readily be absorbed through the
leaves of some plants.
He indicated that this method
of feeding plants has' an economic
value if plants may be fed with
liquid foods which can be sprayed1
over wide crop areas in a brief
period of time. He added, however,
the importance of roots in plant
life must not be overlooked.
Prof. Alfred S. Sussman of the
botany department has also work-
ed in a number of experiments in-
volving the use of radioisotopes in
botanical studies.
Operation of Plant Hormones
One of his most important re-
search projects indicates how plant
hormones operate.Hormones serve
to stimulate growth.
In his research, Prof. Sussman
adds radioactivate carbon to the
extracted hormone of a particular
plant. He then returns it to the
plant.
Then he is able to trace the
movements and actions of the hor-
mones in the living tissue of the
plant with the aid of a Geiger
counter.
Prof. Sussman feels that this
knowledge of hormone actions may
be very important economically in
the control of weeds and plant
growth.

An example of controlling plant1
growth is the use of a compound'
which effects the growth of grass
in such a way that it needs little
mowing and still retains its green-
ness.
Prof. Sussman said that the use
of radioisotopes in plant research
has "accelerated the acquisition
of knowledge" of the nature of
plant life. He added, however, that
this is no indication that such
knowledge could not have been
obtained eventually by other
means.
The importance of the radioiso-
tope in botany and medicine is
self-evident.
Thanks to the radioisotope man
is able for the first time to devise
cures for once incurable diseases,

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ISA Meeting
International Student Associa-
tion will hold a reception to wel-
come international students new
to campus at 7:30 p.m. today in
Rackham Amphitheatre.
James Davis, director of the In-
ternational Center will speak. De-
cade of Achievement, a movie on
the progress of the University
since 1945 will be shown.

One Act Plays
The Department of Speech will
present premieres of three student-
written one-act plays in a.single
performance at 8 p.m. today ire
Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Included on this third experi-
mental playbill will be "Tea." by
William Hawes, Grad., "A Hero's
Welcome," by Donald Kaul, '57E
and "Quarters," by John Szucs,
'57.

I .

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and his knowledge of the plant
and how it operates has been made
clearer through the use of the
radioisotope, thus enabling him to
collect an abundant harvest more
economically.

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By DALE McGHEE
Special counseling services are
available to rushees who may
either find rushing a hectic and
confusing process or have ques-
tions on the fraternity system.
The counseling is offered
throughout the rushing period by
men appointed from each frater-
nity on campus.j
These men wear Inter-Fraternity
Council badges and do not identify
themselves with their respective
fraternities during the rushing
period, according to Stewart Gor-
ron, '58BAd, IFC rushing com-
mittee chairman.
Such in'formation as financial
reports, social activities,, accom-
modations, meals and athletics is
available on all fraternities.
The counselors also have the
latest information concerning fra-
ternity scholarship ratings.
Helpful hints on rushing tech-
nique and general evaluations of
fraternities are other advantages
rushees may receive through the
counseling service, Gordon said.
The counseling system has been
successful in the past, he added.
More than 575 men were coun-
seled last fall.
Counseling sessions are confi-
dential.
Meetings are kept informal. Al-
though the conferences are nor-
mally held in Rm. 3-B of the
Union, rushees may, if they wish,
meet their counselors for coffee.
"The rise in the number of men
taking advantage of rush counsel-

ing facilities has proven the in-
creasing value of this part of our
rushing program," Gordon said.
Interested rushees may receive
counseling by contacting either
a rushing counselor of the IFC
office in the Student Activities
Building.
Television Hour
Medical and social health prob-
lems of elderly people will be dis-
cusses on "Gift of Life" at 10 p.m.
tomorrow on the University's Tele-
vision Hour.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Ad., or Hospital Ad. for Management
Training Program in the field of Men-
tal Health, {
U.S. Information Agency - men and
women, under 31 years of age, citizens
of the U.S. for at least ten years, must
have M.A. or equivalent or two years
work experience in Radio, TV, Jour-
nalism, Public Relations, Area and
Language Study, Political Science,
Communication Techniques, at least
one foreign language is desirable, for
Junior Officer Program.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin Bldg. ext
3371.

Fawn Suede

'U' Political Scientists To Talk
On 'Eisenhower's Second Term'

by

I-

University political scientists
will discuss major problems facing
the Eisenhower Administration in
a new six-week lecture series, the
University Extension Service has
announced.
The lectures, entitled "Eisen-
hower's Second Term," will pertain
to "Personnel and Policies of the
Second Eisenhower Administra-
tion."
Edward W. Hughes, lecturer in
political science, will discuss
"Changes in the Atlantic Alliance:
A British View," Feb. 28. Topic1
for March 7 is "The Middle East-
ern Dilemma," with the speaker
to be announced.
Prof. Russell H. Fifield will speak

on "The Next Four Years in the
Far East" March 14. Political
science instructor John R. Owens
will discuss "Domestic Policies and
Divided Government" for the
March 21 lecture.
Prof. George A. Peek will con-
clude the series with "The Future
of 'New Republicanism'."
All lect'ures will be given at 7:30
p.m. in. 131 Business Administra-
tion School. A $6 registration fee
may be paid before the opening
session in 164 Business Adminis-
tration School or in advance from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. any day at the
Extension Service Office, 4501 Ad-
ministration Building.

EVERY PAIR WITH HAND-SEWN VAMPS
EVERY PAIR WITH NEOLITE SOLES
Imagine it . . . a fascinatingly PLEATED
casual, fashioned of Armour's Shewan Buck,
exciting new continental leather. Neolite soles
for rugged wear.

&.

$795

CAMPUS BOOTERY
304 South State St.

'

Use of this column is restricted to
OFFICIALLY REGISTERED student or-
ganizations. Registration forms are
available in the Office of Student Af-
fairs, . 1020 Administration Building.
Registration for the current semester
should be completed not later than
March 2.
Unitarian Student Group,- Feb. 24,
7:00 p.m., 1st Unitarian Church, Dr.
Kovasci, Hungarian refugee: "Democ-
racy in Action."
Deutscher Verein, meeting, Feb. 25,
71:30 p.m., Union room 3 G. Drama by
the faculty.
Graduate Outing Club, hiking and
supper, Feb. 24, 2 p.m., Rackham.
University of Michigan Folk lancers,
a program of basic round dances, new
members welcome, Feb. 25, 7:30-10:00
p.m., Lane Hall.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Feb.
24, 4:00 p.m., Lane Hall. Dr. Brian
Miliward, "Facts to Faith."
The Hillel Players, meeting, tryouts
to be held, Feb. 24, 3:30 p.m., Hillel.
s s
The Congregational and Disciples
Student Guild, swimming party, Feb.
23, 7:15 p.m., Women's Pool.
The Congregational and Disciples
Student Guild, discussion group, Feb.
24, 9:20 a.m., Guild House, topic "Phil-
osophy of Religion."

Restaurants

You

Will

Enjoy

This

Weekend

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Use this restaurant guide to make your weekend more enjoyable.

Two couples needed
as supervisors for younger boys.
If you desire year around security, like beautiful sur-
roundings, and want a position of love and respect where
you really feel needed this may be your opportunity.
A liberal salary plus board and room, regular raises and
paid vacations, await right parties. For full information
write or call Rev. Gordon C. Blossom, Director of Home
Life, Starr Commonwealth, Route No. 2, Albion, Michi-
gan. Those sending age and phone number will receive
earliest consideration.

.I

Y

The Home of
FINE FOOD
and Michigan Traditions

_-___ -_______-____________--______-- - - - -,<1

Dine at WEBER'S
this weekend for

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. 120 East Liberty
Hours-Mon.-Fri. 11:00, Sat. and Sun. 12:00

a,. -
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DON'T THROW AWAY

5-"

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'Ensian one dollar down.
Subscription balance
of $5.00 must be paid
MONDAY
or deposits will be forfeited

C
.,-

/ien' 4
CHUCK WAGON
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
2045 PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall Henry Turner, Prop.

Delicious
STEAK, CHICKEN,
SEAFOOD
DINNERS

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and
CHAMPAGNE

Try Our

Tempting Homemade Pastries

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Make Your weekend
more enjoyable!
Our chefs are ready to prepare the most delicious food
for your enjoyment.
'Yostwill be served the inest i
Cantonese and American food
TAKE-OUT ORDERS ANY TIME

'l'

3713
Jackson Rd.

A~

Op.. Doty
12 to 9:30 P.M.

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Closed Mondy

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