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February 23, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-23

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5ATUnDAY, FEBRUARY 23,1957

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

'PA!'%V IMMM

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1957 THE MICHIGAN BATTY

£r3mWZ4 WIVE'

5

Michigan Athletic

Squads

To

See

Action

Today

Quintet Attempts To Snap
'Road Jinx' Against OSU

Swimming Team Defends
Undefeated Record Tonight

By DALE CANTOR
The Michigan hardwood war-
riors will attempt to break the
"road jinx" which has hampered
them all season, when they face
second-place Ohio State tonight
at Columbus, O.
The Wolverines, who are cur-
rently tied for sixth place with Il-
linois, will stage a return match
with league-leading Indiana, who
downed the Maize and Blue,
73-68, in the Conference opener,
Monday night at Yost Field
House. The center jump is set for
8 p.m.
Led by All-American candidate
Frank Howard, the Buckeyes
pack a powerful scoring punch
and, although defensively weaker
' than they were last year, have in-
creased. height.
Buckeye Coach Floyd Stahl will
probably start a team consisting

of Howard, 6'6", and Ken Sidle,
a strong rebounder, 6'5", at the
forwards; sophomore Tarry Hus-
ton, 6'6", at center; and at the
guards, Gene Millard, 5'9", and
Jim Laughlin, 6'4", a regular for-
ward last season who has been
shifted back to guard this year.
This quintet averages 6'3 3/5",
the tallest Buckeye team in many.
years.
Play "Spoilers" Role
The Maize and Blue, anxious to
play the role of "spoilers", hope
to regain the services of sopho-
more guard Jack Lewis for Mon-
day night's contest. However,
Coach Bill Perigo plans to use
Lewis tonight only if he needs
him.
Lewis, who is suffering from a
sprained ankle, is still not at full
strength and tires easily.
Perigo will probably go along
with the same starting five he
used against Illino s and Purdue
with M.C. Burton and Pete Til-
lotson at the forwards; Jim
Shearon and George Lee at the
guard slots; and Ron Kramer at
the pivot.
On Monday night. the Woivcr-
ines will have to contend with In-
diana's Archie Dees. who works
for the Hoosiers either from the
corner as a forward or from the
pivot.
D.O. B.
(Daily Official Birth)
The Daily Sports staff boasts
a new fan-even though she
won't be able to read for a
while.
Sandra Baad, weighing in at
7 lbs. 10 oz., made her debut
at University Hospital Thurs-
day. Her seconds were Mr. and
Mrs. James Baad (he's a Daily
Sports Night Editor).

RIVALRY UNLIMITED-One of Illinois' top distance runners,
Karl Jonsson, second place winner in last year's Outdoor Confer-
ence Meet, will match strides with Michigan's Helmar Dolwet in
today's cinder action at Yost Field House.
Wolverines, Illini Renew
Dual Track Meet Rivalry

By SI COLEMAN
Michigan's swimmers will at-
tempt to preserve their unmarred
record when they face Ind'sna at
Bloomington tonight.
Picked as one of the top teams
this year in the Big Ten, the
Wolverines will face no weak con-
tingent in the Hoosiers, as they
try to prove true the preseason
ratings.
Indiana proved itself no easy
foe when it met perennial Big
Ten champion Ohio State three
weeks ago. The Hoosiers were de-
feated by a slim margin of 58-47.
Equally Powerful
If Michigan can get by Indi-
ana. they face two days later an
equally powerful team in Michi-
gan State. A double win for the
Wolverines would do much to in-
crease their claim as the power
in the Big Ten and put them in
excellent position and frame of
mind to face Ohio State next
Saturday.
Leading the Hoosier aggrega-
tion will be two members of the
United States Olympic swimming
team. Bill Woolsey and Sonney
Tanabe. Tanabe holds the Indi-
ana pool record in the 200-yd. in-
dividual medley which he set last
year. Woolsey's specialty is the
220-yd. freestyle for which he
also holds a pool record.
Besides losing to Ohio State,
Indiana has also dropped deci:
sions to Illinois and Michigan
State. But Woolsey and tTanabe
were both out of competition the
first semester and this can possi-
bly be held accountable. The

Hoosiers are considered a much
stronger team than its record in-
dicates.
Good Balance
Good balance is an attribute of
Indiana's, being particularly
adept in the freestyle. In addition
to the two Olympic stars, they
have such performers as Tom
Lord who is considered as one of
the country's most versatile swim-
mers.
Ron Honda will provie strons
competition in the butterfly and
Bill Yap is the top man for Indi-
ana in the breaststroke.

Cage Official Suspected
As New Scandal Looms,

JACK MARCHELLO
. .. tries for 'comeback'

'M'Matmen
To Grapple
With OSU
By DAVE LYON
Michigan and Ohio State, two
wrestling teams which have re-
ceived their share of setbacks this
season, clash today at 3:30 at Yost
Field House.
On the basis of won-lost rec-
ords, it would appear the opposing
squads are fairly evenly matched;
Buckeye coach Casey Fredericks'
invaders sport an unimpressive 3-5
dual meet record, while the im-
proving Wolverine grapplers show
a 2-5 mark.
Michigan coach Cliff Keen, who
comments, "This meet could go
either way," will send the same
lineup against Ohio State that per-
formed against Michigan State
last week.
Going after his third straight
victory since returning to compe-
tition will be Mike Rodriguez,
wrestling at 157 pounds. Last
year's Big Ten 177-pound champ-
ion, Jack Marchello, will try to
get on the victory track again
after being held to a draw against
MSU.
Four men should perform more
than ably for the Buckeyes: Pat
Palumbo at 123 pounds, Bob De-
Felice at either 147 or 157 pounds,
Gene Weiss at 157 or 167, and
heavyweight Ted Talaber.
After today only one more meet
remains on the Wolverines' sched-
ule before the Big Ten meet at
Columbus, March 8 and 9. Minn-
esota comes to Ann Arbor for a

By ART ROSENBAUM
Five key events will be the de-
ciding factor in Michigan's at-
tempt to keep its eighteen straight
dual meet victory streak alive
when it tangles with powerfulIlli-
nois today at 1:00 p.m. in Yost
Field House.
Illinois was the last team to
beat Michigan and close observers
believe that this return match
could go either way with the win-
ning margin being not more than
a couple of points.
Illinois' main strength lies in,

DES MOINES OP) --The Des
Moines Register said Thursday
night a new college basketball
scandal involving an official in-
stead of players could be brewing.
At 'east two Iowa schools have
received recent telephone calls
from a man in Minneapolis ask-
ing whether a certain official was
scheduled to work a game, the
newspaper said.
However. the caller was given
no satisfaction because it is
against the rules of most confer-
ences to divulge such information.
The Iowans learned, the Regis-
ter said, that Minneapolis gamb-
lers and odds makers were ex-
tremely suspicious of games
worked by the official.
"They suspect him of assisting

in betting coups by using his
whistle to control the point
'spread' -- the number of points
by which a game is decided," the
Register said.
"A sudden last-minute splurge
of betting on a game last week
was mentioned -- a splurge in
which the bettors are said to have
made a killing."
The newspaper said a federal
grand jury in Minneapolis recent-
ly indicted five Minneapolis men
and one from Peoria, Ill., in Its
Investigation of analleged mid-
west gambling syndicate.
Among those to testify, the
Register said, was Leo Hirschfield
of Minneapolis, president of Ath-
letic Publications, Inc., publish-
er of a weekly sports dope sheet.

JIM HAYSLETT
... always climbing

'M' piMqde... JIM

By RUDE DiFAZIO
"When I was a boy in Indian-
apolis, I was always climbing trees
and" hanging by my legs."
So begins Jim Hayslett's narra-
tive on how he became interested
in gymnastics.
The serious-minded sophomore
of the Michigan gymnastics team
always wanted to be an acrobat
although he will be the first to
admit that there is a big difference
between acrobatics and the preci-
sion of the gymnast.
His burning desire finally re-
ceived an outlet when on a Satur-
day afternoon a friend invited Jim
to accompany him to the local
YMCA.
r' On His Way
On that particular day the
physical' education instructor at
the 'Y' was ill and a gymnast took
over and devoted the entire session
to tumbling. Jim was on his way.
In grade school, Jim's physical
education instructor told him of
the Turners, a German family
society which makes gymnastics a
family outing.
As Jim tells it, "the whole fame
ily would come down to the Tur-
} ners and exercise together much
as our families go on picnics."
It was in this early setting that
Jim gained his ability on the
parallel bars, side horse and tram-
poline, for the German method of
gymnastics concentrates on this
heavy equipment.
Jim states that tumbling and

free exercise come from the lighter
work of the Swedish system.
What does gymnastics mean to
Jim? When you ask be prepared
to listen intently.
Country in Poor Shape
Jim will tell you very plainly
but forcefully that this country is
in poor shape physically. To prove
this he cites President Eisenhow-
er's report of last z ear.
He believes firmly that a strong
gymnastics program in grade
school instead of the present un-
directed recreation program would
prepare our youth for later life.
"I have seen men in their late
30's and early 40's who are still
active in gymnastics, working out
regularly, who are in better shape
than many professional baseball
players," says Jim.
Work Not Strenuous
"Unlike other sports the work is
not strenuous, once.a person is in
shape," says Jim. "In gymnastics a

participant does not push himself
to exhaustion as a football player
or trackman might.
"The biggest pressure in gym-
nastics is the tension of the com-
petition. Once you start your stunt
you can't stop or you are dis-
qualified, which of course does
not help your team," declares Jim.
"I have heard football, basket-
ball, and baseball players say that
once they took the field and start
the game they relax. The gymnast
does not have time to relax.
"This, and the muscle control
that is required, is what makes
gymnastics tough," concludes Jim.
Jim is a graduate of Indianapolis
Tech High School.
He is 20 years old and in the
School of Education. He intends to
major in Physical Education and
minor in General Science. And
there is a little thing of a U.S.
Olympic Gymnastics Team which'
he is ultimately pointing to in

their distance runners. They have
exceptional performers in their
miler, Capt. Bob Dintelmann and
two-miler Karl Jonsson. Both fin-
ished second in their specialties in
the outdoor Conference meet.
'M' Counter
Michigan will counter with Geert
Keilstrup and Helmar Dollwet,
running Keilstrup in the mile and
Dollwet in both the mile and two
mile. A Michigan victory in these
events would deprive Illinois of
some of their "sure" points.
Football halfbacks Jim Pace of
Michigan and Bobby Mitchell of
Illinois should stage a close duel
in the 60-yd. dash. Mitchell is also
favored in the broadjump where
he has jumped 24 ft.
Illini Al Urbanckus and Brendan
O'Reilly of Michigan, who tied
each other in the outdoor Con-
ference championship, will meet
in a crucial high jump rematch.
Captain Dave Owen will take
one or two puts and then board a
New York plane flight to partici-
pate in the National AAU Champ-
ionships.
This meet may be a preview of
the Big Ten Indoor Conference
Meet next week, and the winning
team will have to be considered a
serious challenge for the title.
The field events start at 1:00
p.m. and the running events at
1:30. Admission will be free to all
those showing their student I-D
cards.
Distinctive Hairstyling
To Please!
* NO WAITING
* 11 BARBERS
Try Us
The Daseola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theater

r

" +

for those who love JAZZ
by TED HEATH
-At Carnegie Hall,
-At the London Palladium
-Rogers for Moderns
ALSO
-The Misty Miss Christy
-After the Lights Go
Down Low (Hibbler)

Take a
2-minute
preview of
your path
to RCA
engineering

I

dua enageen net Sturay

The lT d TI Cehte
300 SOUTH THAYER

F

-7

- -- - - mmwftd

i'

for your eating pleasure.

0sO

PIZZA at the Del Rio
BEER - WI NE - also takeout

122 W. Washington

Closed Tuesday

I

1 1

0

0.-0
*

0

IKORESKY --
f SIKORSI AIRCRAFT REPRESENIVE
IS COMINGBIN PERSOR 0 TELL YOU Now
TO HlICli YOUR ENGINEERING FU TURE
10 A RELICOPTER-
AAIJ

.y.
?z:E
i.
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7-,
.9e
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9

"
"
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"
"

Will be on campus
February 26 and 27

Specialized training program
Earn a regular professional engineering salary as you
work on carefully rotated assignments giving you a
comprehensive view of RCA engineering. Your indi-
vidual interests are considered and you have every
chance for permanent assignment in the area you
prefer. Your work gets careful review under RCA's
advancement plan and you benefit from guidance of
experienced engineers and interested management.
Following training, you will enter development and de-
sign engineering in such fields as Radar, Airborne Elec-
tronics, Computers, Missile Electronics. For manu-
facturing engineers, there are positions in quality;
material or production control, test equipment design,
methods. You may also enter development, design or
manufacture of electron tubes, semiconductor com-
ponents or television.
Direct hire
If you are qualified by experience or advancededuca-
tion, your interests may point to a direct assignment.
The RCA management representative will be glad to
help you. Many fields are open ... from research, sys-
tems, design and development to manufacturing engi-
neering ... in aviation and missile electronics, as well
as radar, electron tubes, computers, and many other
challenging fields.
. , , and you advance.
Small engineering groups mean recognition for initi-
ative and ability, leading on to advancement that's
professional as well as financial. RCA further helps
your development through reimbursement for gradu-
ate study under a liberal tuition refund plan.
Now.., for a longer look at RCA

i

or placement interviews in the following areas:

+
f

AIRCRAFT ENGINE CONTROLS
GUIDED MISSILES-COMPLETE DEVELOPMENT

AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR
AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS

MECHANICAL,
ELECTRONIC
AEftONAUTICAL

ENGINEERS

See your placement director about an appointment
with an RCA engineering management representative
who will be on campus...
Monday, March 4 and Tuesday, March 5, 1957

I

I

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