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February 21, 1957 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

..TWR I AY, FEBRUARY 21,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAOR FM

THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 21,1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAOE 7!VZ

Union Plans
Art Contest,
U' Day Tour
Other Spring Events
Will Include Dances,
Photo Competition
By NANCY STAMM
Weekend here - nothing to
do?
With this in mind, the Union is
ready to fill the gap with a di-
verse selection of activities.
Tomorrow evening and every
Friday, duplicate bridge can be
played by anyone. Weekly prizes
are awarded each evening and at
the end of the month to the per-
son with ,the highest master total.
At the end of the year the Union
will have a tournament between
the weekly winners.
At present, University under-
graduates are competing with
undergraduates from more than
100 U.S. colleges for the 1957 Na-
tional Intercollegiate Bridge Tour-
nament.
* Little Club
Friday night the Union pro-
vides the gay-hearted with a free
dance - the Little Club.
Its characteristic candle-lighted
red-checkered tables add atmos-
phere to the music provided by
the bands of John Harbor, Al
Pake, and Ray Lewis.
The end of the week-end and
no money? Sunday evening from
8 to 10:30 p.m. free record dancing
is held in the Terrace Room.
Art Contest
For those with a talented brush,
an art contest is the Union's an-
3wer. Different classes, including
paintings, etchings, sculpture,
will be judged on March 23 and
24.
Ins conjunction with the IFC
and Panhellenic Association, the
Union is helping sponsor the
Louis Armstrong, concert which
is a Greek Week highlight to be
given on Friday, March 29.
Junior college students will be
given a hearty welcome to the
University on March 29. Assem-
blies, tours, and consultation from
personnel from the fields of con-
centration and Dean's office will
be present to answer all their
questions.
Photography Contest
April plans for the Union are
highlighted by a photography
contest on the week-end of April
26.
University Day, April 27, will
give high school juniors and se-
niors from Ohio and Mich. a
chance to hear the University
Glee Club, attend mock lectures,
and attend open houses at the
various schools of the University.
Guides for this day will be alumni
from the visiting students schools.

PRODUCTIONS IN RETROSPECT:
Co-ed Shows Prove Success on Campus

By SUE RAUNHEIM
What makes a good co-ed
show?
This past semester has been
one of successful innovations such
as Soph Show and Musket, both
co-ed presentataions.
These organizations had differ-
ent objectives in mind and feel
that they achieved their goals.
According to publicity manager
Robert Arnove, "Soph Show was
a success even before the initial
performance." The sophomores
had many objectives when they
attempted the first co-ed class
production,
They wanted to rouse class
spirit, offer students a chance to
hold responsible positions and to
achieve successful co-educational
cooperation on a class project.
Spirit Evident
Throughout the rehearsals, the
sophomores' spirit was always evi-
dent. Even the students who were
just working behind the foot-
lights were anxious to do all they
could to help make the show a
success. The coeds and men put
long hours and hard work into
their show.
Hank Kerr, general co-chair-
man, felt that he ''enjoyed work-
ing on the show because everyone
was so willing to contribute."
One of the purposes of Soph
Show was to provide a back-i
ground of experience and respon-;
sibility for the students so they;
could go on to other projects.
Large Cast+
Many comments were made
I concerning the large numbers in
the cast, but the sophomores felt
that by limiting the show to a
select few, they would be limiting3
the opportunities for many other
interested students who wished tol
participate.,
According to Arnove, "Director
Ted Heusel was more than a di-+
rector - he was a friend." Heus-+
el put in more time and effort
than was required of him and he
was always enthusiastic and will-
ing to give useful suggestions.
The sophomores felt that Heus-
el was truly interested in the suc-
cess of their show and immedi-
ately after the production was;
held, they voted to obtain his
services for next year's show.
Financially Successful
Financially the show was a suc-
cess. It played to two full houses
so that all overhead expenses were
paid.
Soph Show was also successful
in the sense of audience enjoy-
ment. The songs from "Good
News" were given hearty applause.
The first co-ed show to be pre-
sented on the University campus
was Soph Show. There was no
pre-existing core of people to
work with, no previous co-educa-
tional show to follow - no glory
involved. The students accom-

.".
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'GOOD NEWS'--Male and female alike were seen in this year's Soph Show production. 'Brigadoon,'
another new co-ed show, was also presented on campus last semester.

plished what they did because of
hard work and enthusiasm.
Old "Union Opera"
Musket show was also a new
production which grew out of the
annual Union Opera. The Union
and last year's executive commit-
tee of Union Opera voted to add
coeds to the show in order to bet-I
ter satisfy the student audiences.
Musket was planned with threeI
objectives. Most important, the,
organization wanted to present
good entertainment and let the
audience have a good time. Mus-
ket offered an opportunity to stu-I
dents majoring in music, dance
and theater to present their tal-
ent in a challenging way.
The co-ed production plans to'
have road shows in the near fu-
ture which they hope will add to
the presige of the University.
Want Original Script
The executive committee ac-
cording to Fred Steingold, iro-
motions, tried to use student per-
sonnel in all aspects of the show.
They would like to present an ori-
ginal script next year written by
students if a good one is offered.
Since this was the first Musket

opened and reviews were printed,1
the executive committee and ac-
tors could be seen grinning from
ear to ear."
Steingold commented that the
co-ed show had the advantage of
dealing with more serious prob-
lems, love scenes could be per-
formed effectively and the show
did not have to be farcial as in
the days when the show was com-
pletely male.
Dropped Into Office
For a month and a half after
the show closed, actors and direc-
tors of Musket dropped into the
Musket office to "hang around."
"Everyone felt so close to the
show that it actually became a
part of them. Some students even
suggested putting on another
show in the spring," remarked
Steingold.

During opening night intermis-
sion, two members of last year's
Union Opera could be heard com-
menting to each other, "It's a
good show but it's too profession-
al." The Musket core regarded
this as a backhand compliment.
They feel they satisfied the stu-
dents and offered good enter-
tainment.
League Petitioning
Petitioning for junior positions
in the League will close Thursday,
Feb. 28 at 5 p.m. at which time
all petitions are due.
Senior petitioning has been ex-
tended from tomorrow to Friday
at 5 p.m. in the League. Any ques-
tions concerning specific positions
can be answered by calling the
League undergraduate office.

Daily Classifieds Bring Quick Results

I m

I

production, the directors and ac-
tors had no idea of what the
audience reaction w o u 1d be.
"There seemed to be many loose
ends during the last rehearsals,"
said Steingold, but after the show
GUADALAJARA
SUMMER SCHOOL
The accredited bilingual school
sponsored by the Universidad Auto-
noma de Guadalajara and mem-
bers of Stanford University faculty
will offer in Guadalajara, Mexico,
July 1-Aug. 10, courses in art,
folklore, 'geography, history, lan-
guage and literature. $225 covers
tuition, board and room. Write
Prof. Juan B. Rael, Box K, Stan-
ford University, Calif.

UNION THEATER TRIP
"MY FAIR LADY"
Starring:
BRIAN AHERNE
and
ANN RODGERS
MARCH 26 and APRIL 2
$5.25 includes transportation
to Detroit
Tickets on sale at:

SALE

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HERE ARE THIS WEEK'S TIE-BREAKERS IN
OLD GOLD'S
SCAMOOLS
PUZZLES

4<,
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TIE-BREAKING PUZZLE NO. 4
s-_N A
NBE
CLUE: Benjamin Franklin participated in the
founding of this school. Later, the first uni-
versity medical school in the country was
established here.
CLUE: This New England university was
chartered in 1869. A theological seminary,
founded in 1839, was its forerunner, and
was absorbed as the university's first de-
partment.
ANSWER 1
ANSWER 2
Name
Address
City State
College

TIE-BREAKING PUZZLE NO. 5
~WA J
C ICN
5
CLUE: This Catholic university for men,
conducted by Jesuit Fathers, is located in a
town founded as a mission in 1777. The
university was opened in 1851.
CLUE: This women's college, founded in
1879, is affiliated with a famous university
for men. It is named to honor an early
benefactor of the men's university.
ANSWER 1
ANSWER 2
Name
Address
City State
College

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HOLD UNTIL YOU HAVE COMPLETED ALL EIGHT TIE-BREAKERS

All participants who completed the initial set
of twenty-four puzzles correctly are required
to solve a series of eight tie-breakers, in order
to compete for the prizes in the tie. Tie-breakers
four and five are published herein and the
remaining three puzzles will appear in
successive issues.
Remember-first prize is a TOUR FOR TWO
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