100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 15, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


VARY 15, 1957

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

f..... -

aUARY 15, 1957a. TH- MI.C .t)l'N.1ATTY

PAGE T

}URS ASIA:
Likert Will Choose Country for Sample Survey

By DIANE FRASER
Investigating possibilities of set-
ting up survey research centers in
underdeveloped countries was the
recent project of the Director of
the Institute for Social Research,
Prof. Rensis Likert.
Prof. Likert returned Dec. 23
from a two month tour of seven
Mid-Eastern and Asiatic countries.
The U.S. International Coopera-
tion Administration asked Prof.
Likert to undertake a study in
Lebanon, India, Iran, Pakistan,
Thailand, Indonesia and the Phil-
ippines to choose a country to set
up a sample survey project.
"The people in these countries
have more desire for changes and
are accomplishing more than at
any other time in centuries. There
is now great enthusiasm and hope
for changes," Prof. Likert said.
Fascinating Changes
} "The people are tackling seem-
ingly insurmountable problems and
mating great results. The changes
are fascinating," he recalled.
When changes in a country pro-
ceed at such a rapid rate, some'
will be more successful than others.
Prof. Likert -pointed out it is im-
portant to have a measurement to
guide the country toward the most
efficient and successful develop-
ments and show where further ef-
forts are needed.
Sample surveys in these lands
would supply this feedback to
help the governments determine
the successful projects, and reasons
for thei success," the director ex-
plained.
ICA plans to set up a sample
survey center in one of these seven
countries to show how surveys can
be used and to act as a guide for
future centers.
Visited ICA Missions
Prof. Likert visited the ICA mis-
sions in these countrys and talked
to government officials to deter
mine their interest in having this
study conducted in their country.
"Every one of the ICA missions
asked us to give their country con-
sideration and all were interested
in having this study conducted in
their country," Prof. Likert said..
The survey project will be fi-
nanced by ICA and in part by the
country in which the survey is set
up.
Prof. Likert and Samuel P.
Hayes, both of the Institute of
Social Research, will attend a
conference in Washington Jan. 18
I to decide upon the country to
receive the sample survey.
Need More Data
According to Prof. Likert, who
received his PhD in Psychology
from Columbia University, the

development and the operation of
producer cooperatives.
The center would be organized
as part of the Ahmedabad Textile
Industry Research Association, an
organization of textile industries
in conjunction with the Indian
Government.
According to Prof. Likert, "This
nation-wide research association
would be established in connection
with Gujarat University at Ah-
medabad. Its director would be Dr.
Kamla Chowdhy, a University
graduate in social psychology."
International.
Students .Plan
State Tour
International Center will soon
be "hitting the road."
Five students from four coun-
tries will illustrate aspects of their
varied cultures to students and
civic groups in six southern Michi-
gan cities. The tour is being spon-
sored by the International Center
and the Office of University Rela-
tions.
Those makihg up this "interna-
tional vaudeville" were selected on
their ability to speak English and
their various talents.
The group will present programs
from Jan. 28 to Feb. 1 st Adrian
Hillsdale, Jackson, Constantine,
White Pigeon, and Vicksburg.
Not only will Michigan residents
see foreign cultures but the mem-
bers of the group will get to know
something about life in small mid-
western and industrial cities.
The groups will be guests of

WHEN THE LUCKIES are gone, you've still got the
memory of some great smoking. You've also got a
Slack Pack. Chin up, though, you can get more down
at the store-and every Lucky tastes like a million
bucks. That's because every Lucky is made of fine to-
bacco-mild, good-tasting tobacco that's TOASTED
to taste even better. Have you tried a Lucky lately?
It's the best-tasting cigarette you ever smoked!

WHEN I u/CKIEFT

-Daily-David Arnold
PROF. LIKERT-Director of the Institute of Social Research
visits seven underdeveloped countries to set up a sample survey
project.

countries need data collected for
economic finance, health condi-
tions, education and agriculture.
"Most countries don't even have
current accurate data on what is
being produced and consumed," he
pointed out.
In one of the countries, Prof.
Likert was informed by agricultural
experts that improvement in pro-
duction was possible by better ag-
ricultural methods. The farmers,
however, have not accepted the
plan.
"A survey would be an efficient
way to find out to what extent the
information is reaching the people
and how to make the program
more effective," Prof. Likert com-
mented.
"The purpose of this demonstra-
tion is to show how surveys can be
used by ICA missions and the
governments of these countries
with the hope that each country
will establish a survey research
center," he said.
Wants Same Pattern
"I hope that the universities in
these countries will pattern survey
research centers after ours at the
University,"' Prof. Likert said, "and

will train graduate students as
well as conduct studies for govern-
ment agencies."
"Such a program should involve'
training in the United States of
personnel from these nations and
assistance in establishing and
operating sample survey organi-
zations in each of these countries."
While in India, Prof. Likert also
discussed a proposed center for

WHAT IS A GERMAN CHEERLEADER#
Rootin' Teuton
ROTH NAFER.
FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL
""IT'S
TOASTED"
to taste
betterCK
STRIK
..s tif..
4 ~
C 1 G A R E T T E S
------------ -- =23

WHAT IS A FRESH FRUIT#
Brazen Raisin
JAMES HALL.
HARVARD
WHAT IS A MEDIEVAL LAND-GRABBERI
Fief Thief
PETER GRAM.
STANFORD

WHAT IS A SORCERESS' COZY NOOK?
Witch Niche
LUCILLE SUTTMIIIR.
CORNELL
WHAT IS A SAD ANTELOPEI
Blue Gnu
EDWARD PRICE. Ill.
i. OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

WHAT IS BUG BUSS?
I
Flea Ghee
HAROLD LINK.
U. OF NORTH DAKOTA
WHAT IS AN UNWASHED HOBO0
Fragraxnt Vagrant
ROBERTA MARGOLIN.
G C.N.Y.

group dynamics to conduct re- residents in the communitiesj
search on leadership, community visited.
DO YOU WEAR GLASSES?
See the New Type, Tiny,
Plastic, Invisible, Fluidless
CONTACT LENSES
Safe and practical for work and play. Write or phone for a free
booklet about contact lenses or drop in for a free demonstration.
BETTER VISION CENTER
706 Wolverine Bldg.-4th and Washington Sts.
Ann Arbor Phone NO 8-6019

_k

S~m BetteI
CLEANER, FRESHERS SMOOTHEF

STUCK FOR DOUGH?
-ASTART STICKLINGI
MAKE $25
We'll pay $25 for every Stickler we
print-and for hundreds more that
never get used! So start Stickling-
they're so easy you can think of dozens
inseconds! Sticklers are simple riddles
with two-word rhyming answers. Both
words must have the same number of
syllables. (Don't do drawings.) Send
'em all with your name, address,
R college and class to Happy-Joe-Lucky,
'Box 67A, Mount Vernon, N. Y.

QA.T.Co. PRODUCT OF

v'Ai c1CAMZRICA's LEADING MANUFACTURER OF CIGARETTES

I

_,

I

U

7

"What's it like to be
A PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
ENGINEER AT IBM?"
(hree years ago, college senior Gerald Maley asked himself this question.
Today, an Associate Engineer and leader of a nine-man team, Jerry re-
views his experience at IBM and gives some pointers that may be helpful
to you in taking the first, most important step in your engineering career.

"What really sold me," says Jerry,
"was the way they conducted engi-
neering. I'd expected rooms full of
engineers at desks. Instead, I found
all the informal friendliness of my
college lab."
Gerald, an E.E., came directly to
IBM from the University of Buffalo,
in 1953. Starting as a Technical En-
gineer, he was immediately assigned
to work, with two others, on design-,
ing a small calculator. The supervisor
of this project was Dr. R. K. Richards,
author of "Arithmetic Operation in
Digital Computers." Jerry learned a
great deal about computers in a very
short time. Incidentally, his partic-
ular machine is now going into pro-

(his brother is a mathematician) and
is fascinated by these mathematical
marvels which are revolutionizing
man's ways of doing things in so many
fields. He enjoys' working on large
equipment ...' and on "pulses." "It's
more logical," he says. "In computer

plays. The latter is his own interest,
which is why he is in advanced ma-
chine design. He points out that IBM-
is careful to take these factors into
consideration-another reason, per-
haps, why turnover at IBM is less
than one-sixth the national average.
What about promotions?
When asked about advancement
opportunities at IBM, Jerry says,
"You can hardly miss in this field and
in this company. They tell me sales
about double every five years-which
in itself makes promotion almost axi-
omatic." He endorses the IBM policy
of promoting from within, with merit
the sole criterion. The salary factor,
he remembers, was not his first con-
sideration. While excellent, the tre-
mendous advancement potential was
of far greater importance.

i

la

This field is so new

work, you can actually see things
happening, which is not the case with
all electronic equipment today. And
it's not all solid math, either. What's
more, this field is so new, that pretty
soon you're up with everybody else."
Gerald has done recruiting work
himself for IBM and believes he un-
derstands some of the college senior's
problems. "I usually begin an inter-
view by determining a man's inter-

Assigns problems to his group
duction. As Jerry says, "It makes an
engineer feel good to see his project
reach the production stage-and to
be able to follow it through."
Promoted to Associate Engineer
after 16 months, Jerry is now the
leader of a nine-man team. He as-
signs problems to his group for solu-
tion, approves their block diagrams
and the models they build. Perhaps
an hour a day goes into paper work
such as requisitioning equipment for
his group and reviewing technical
publications, in counseling members

Promotion almost axiomatic
IBM hopes this message will give you
some idea of what it's like to be an E.E.
in Product Development at IBM. There
are equal opportunities for I.E.'s, M.E.'s,
physicists, mathematicians, and liberal
arts majors in IBM's many divisions-
Research, Manufacturing Engineering,
Sales and Technical Service.Why not drop

4 l.1 i

E

'0

Uf

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan