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January 13, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY,.J IS." l9b"I

ST.Th~DAY. TANTJAkV i~ I~Y
I _______________________________________________________________________________________________ ---------

,,,.
. .

I.

I',

U, MATERIALS:
N Unit Supplies
id to Hungary

Social Research Institute
Uses Science in Studies

. 1

I
I

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11

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D ACT, DL+DT DT. D/"S

Iy ROSE PERLBERG
In a glass-walled office build-
g' high above Manhattan's East
ver, an international team is
rking to keep the state of Hun-
ry on the map.
Through United Nations Head-
arters in New York is channeled
e bulk of aid to the Hungarian
ople.
Since Oct. 28, when the Security
uncil first met to discuss the
bleni men and women from
untries all over the world have
>keg unceasingly to relieve the
ngarian situation.
V7 Duckworth-Barker, Press Of-
er in the UN Office for Relief
_Hungarian People, is one of
ese workers. And his job has
aore than average meaning for
Gained Special Insight.
As visiting Professor of English
Lerature at the University of
apest before World War II, .he
tiried lnsight not only into Hun-
trian language and literature, but
reir wta of life. .
Bec se of this first, hand ex-
rience, Duckworth-Barker was
ke foi his help in the Hungar-
n problem .
The UN hndles relief for Hun-
trians in their country and for
te thousands of refugees tem-
n'arily seeking asylum in Aus-
ia_,he said.
The Englishman explained the
N first started concentrating on
lief Nov. 15, when the General
ssembly called on Secretary Gen-
1 Dag Hammarskjold to raise
tributions from governments of
member-nations.
"rgent pleas were sent to about
Icountries," he continued, "but
le response has been small and
scouraging."
Pledged Money
Suntries have pledged money
d 'material goods, he said, but
>t nearly enough to see the Hun-
rianis through their crisis.
e feels the instability of the
itical 'situation in. Hungary is
-dmg up contributions.
$ YN-purchased supplies are de-
vered through the International
ed Cross, Duckworth-Barker ex-
aned, "because the Red Cross
universally respected and the
N, with no formal agency to
ndle the problem, has no work-
s on the spot."
Relief "in the early stages" has
en effective, he says. Soup kit-
'eas have been set up and cloth-
g dl.stributed. "But industry, the
asis and life-blood of the people,
still flat on its back."
Relief worker Duckworth-Bark-
defines the "big problem" as
"tting factories and coal mines
ging again-reviving manufac
ring, communications, and dis-
ibutions systems."
After Jan. 1, Hungarian work-
s who didn't go back to their
bs, not for personal reasons, but
k of facilities, will be getting
Scompensation. ,
"Their dispair may lead to an-
her uprising," he added grimly.
Face Large Problems
Relief workers face a problem
most as large as technical aid,
id more imminent, in reconstruc-
on.
Gazing sadly out of the window
his comfortably furnished of-
cDuckworth-Barker described
e "wretched conditions" under
hich a majority of Hungarians
:e forced to live-"in damaged
mes with no heat-often exposed
the elements." (Thousands of
mes have been demolished.)
Said the man who once lived
th them: "Such a life must not
ly weaken an already physically
WU ERTH L

exhausted people, but lower their
morale-high as it has been."
Attempts to get Hungary back
on her feet-are not limited to aid
from the UN and the West. (Pri-
vate voluntary organizations and
the general public have been con-
tributing.) Russia is also sending
technical aid and so far has not
interfered with UN work, Duck-
w orth-Barker said.
Tht fact aid has reached only a
part of the people is due to in-
sufficient supplies - "just not
enough to go around." Right now,
"the Hungarians are so desperate
they'll take help from wherever
they can get it," he added. -
Duckworth-Baker's tone is light-
er and his face brightens when he
speaks of the refugee situation.
Constrastingly he finds this prob-
lem "encouraging . . . and with
anything like luck, we should be
able to solve it."
UN Handles Contribution
Contributions and offers to ac-
commodate Hungarians fleeing
their war - torn homeland go
through the UN High Commis-
sioner's Office (headquarters: Ge-
neva, Switzerland), a body estab-
lished specifically to handle ref-
ugee problems.
"We have gotten over and above
what we hoped for in an appeal
to UN member-nations Nov. 29,"
he said happily. "The air lift is
successfully operating and the
United States and1 other countries
have considerably increased ,their
quotas."
"Seldom has any group of refu-
gees been so welcomed and re-.
teived as heroes wherever they
migrated," he declared.
UN aid goes to the approxi-
mately 60,000 Hungarians who
stay in Austria "because they can't
get away or prefer to remain near
Hungary for immediate return in
case the political s ituat io n
changes," Duckworth-Barker re-
marked.
All Refugees Cared For
Refugees who use Austria as a
stepping-stone to other countries
are also cared for.
Funds (a dollar a day supports
one person) pouring in from gov-
ernments and/o, private volun-
tary organizations keep the dis-
placed Hungarians clothed, fed
and sheltered - "although living
conditions are far from the best."
"Unless there is another enor-
mous influx into Austria the prob-
lem should not become desperate,"
Duckworth-Barker feels. But he
added that Operation Relief to
Refugees "still needs as much help
as we can get."
So far workers have put their
energy into coping with only the
present crisis.
Considering Hungary's future,
Duckworth-Ba'rker thinks, frowns,
and shakes his head pessimistic-
ally.
"It will be at least a year until
we can begin to'see the end of the
ruins providing there is no new
uprising," he predicts.
"The most we can ultimately
hope for in that country is a gov-
ernment with a more liberal policy,
and Russian troops withdrawn to
certain specified zones," he sob-
erly concludes.

To increase understanding of
social behavious through the use
of scientific methods is the aim of
the University's Institute of So-
cial Research
The Social Research Institute
was founded in 1946 as "an agency
Steinhoff,
Crary Plans
Presented
(Continued from Page 1)
4) Travel arrangements at
Christmas would be staggered, with
students leaving as -they finish
their examinations.
5) Students would have an ear-
lier start in securing jobs at the
beginning of the summer.
Three Disadvantages
Prof. Crary also notes these
disadvantages of his plan:
1) Rescheduling of semesters
would put the University's semes-
ters at odds with those of other
schools. Freshmen entering in
January would not have finished
high school semesters by the time
the University's second semester
has begun.
2) Alumni may not like coming
here in May instead of the tradi-
tional June month of reunions.
3) Athletic Department may
object to a disturbance of spring
schedules and classes being held
during September football train-
ing.
The Crary Plan, as outlined, was
presented to the students !n a
referendum instigated by the old
Student Legislature, and received
approximately 4500 votes, twice
that off all other plans voted upon.
This, however, was reportedly
ignored by the 1953-55 calendaring
committee, which found the Crary
Plan too much of a change and
entirely infeasible for the Univer-
sity.
In spite of its popularity, the
plan was then regarded impracti-
cal.
Steinhoff Speaks
Prof. William R. Steinhoff,
chairman of the junior and senior
faculty counselors, also had some
definite suggestions for rearrang-
ing the school calendar.
Under his plan, the fall semester
would begin the week following
Labor Day, allowing students to
work until then, and complete
classes by Christmas. Examina-
tions would follow Christmas vaca-
tion in January.
Both this and the Crary Plan
would leave no time for students
to work prior to Christmas Day,
one of the major student com-
plaints about the present calen-
dar.
Prof Steinhoff explained that
his plan would leave the necessary
interval between semesters and yet
the second semester would begin
in January, again letting the stu-
dent out in May and giving him
the two to three week jump on
summer jobs.
Prof. Steinhoff stressed the im-
portance of getting rid of the
"lame-duk" period of classes and
unifying the first semester, there-
by providing a solid period of in-
struction.
"As long as you think of the
calendar as a series of compro-
mises," Prof. Steinhoff said, "it
has no steady basis to stand on."

for conducting research on prob-
lems concerning human behaviour
in social settings."
Since its founding, the Insti-
tute has attracted the attention
of administrators and the general
public as well as social scientists,
for the scope of its work has been
broad,stressing the utilitarian as-
pects and the obligations of so-
cial science.
Study Diverse Problems
Many diverse problems have
been studied, and all studies were
selected because of basic theoret-
ical significance or immediate so-
cial implications-illustrating: a
philosophy of the Institute that
scientific methods can make a
major contribution to knowledge
about social affairs and human
welfare.
In. generalthese problems have
been broad enough to require teamp
research rather than the work of
separate individuals.
The Social Research' Institute's
program encompasses a variety of
activities, for in order to develop
research skills there must be con-
stant training of personnel both
for the staff in the Institute and
for research in other agencies.
Consultation Program
Also, in order, to have a con-
stant exchange of findings and
methods with other researchers,
there is an active program of con-
sultation, publication, and com-
munication and contact with col-
leagues.
The Institute also conducts re-
search on methods of research in-
volving new and more complex
problems, and develops procedures
for the interpretation and appli-
cation of research findings-thus
leading to the training of leaders
and technicians in the use of re-
search results.
Because of its broad programs,
the Social Research Institute has
become focus and purposeful stim-
ulator of some controversy about
the meaning of research results,
the methods of social science and
the means for enhancing the
methods of social science and the
means for enhancing the creative
output of social scientists.
Conducts Research
The chief purpose of the Insti-
tute is the conduct of significant
research, which includes problems
of research from its inception to
its application.
The intent in establishing the
Institute of Social Research was to
have within the University com-
munity a staff and facilities for
certain kinds of social research
which could not readily be found
within the existing branches of
the University.
The Institute was established as
administratively separate from the
teaching departments and schools,
but closely allied with them
through the sharing of some
teaching and other professional
activities.
The staff of the Institute con-
sists of about 70 research scientists,
a home office clerical and admin-
istrative staff of about 50, and a
staff of part-time supporting re-
search personnel numbering about
200.
The Institute of Social Research
is supported primarily through
contracts with government agen-
cies, private. business firms, and
through grants from research-
supporting foundations.
The Institute also receives com-
pensation for certain services pro-
vided to other parts of the Uni-
versity.

MICHIGAN 'DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
FOR SALE
9 x t12 COTTON RUlGS
$29.95
Many varities of colors to choose from
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERING
207 E. Washington
NO 3-5536
Open Monday evening until 8:30
SALE
100% men's wool flannel trousers.
$10.95
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington
)B178
New Tires- Batteries
With written warranty. Also snow
tires. Long budget terms, no down
payment. Get our price before you
buy!
Hickey's Service Station
300 N. Main, cor Catherine. NO 8-7717
)B190
HI F1 STUDIO
Uuiversity Electrovoice, Viking,
Garrard and the best of the rest.
* "Build it yourself" Kits
" "Installment Plan" to fit your
needs.
" "Audiophile Net" or Catalog Prices
1317 So. University
NO 2-9595' )B194
CAMERA: Contax IIIA (Zeiss Ikon)
plus extras. Sonnar fl.5 lens-maxi-
mum shutter speed: 1/1250. Built-in
exposure meter. Details on request.
William Iveson. '56, 174 North
Scott, Adrian, Michigan. )B193
HI-FlSALE
AUDIO SUPPLY
LABORATORI ES
334 Nickels Arcade
NO 2-7767 and NO 2-9425
)B179
1955 ADMIRAL 17" TV set, new pic-
ture tube. Cost new $160, now $60.
Wisby, University Ext. 725. )B188
DIAMOND RINGS-Complete selection
of wedding rings, bands, birth stone
rings and men's diamond rings. 55%
off. Direct from factory. We can not
be beat. Written guarantee. Money
refunded if not satisfied. At NO 2-
2684. )B191
Aquariums and supplies, tropical
fish, plants, water lizards and baby
cockatiels
UNIVERSITY AQUARIUM
328 E. Liberty NO 3-0224
Open daily except Thursday
)B185
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
Is your house in need of a more
recent set of Encyclopedias? I have
a 1955 edition of Amerciana En-
cyclopedia which I must sell (1956
Annal included), ill sacrifice for
much less than cost. Perfect con-
dition. CalltNO 2-7749.P )B183
42' 1955 TRAVELO mobile home in fine
shape. Large living room, 2 bed-
rooms, full bath, dining areabin
kitchen. Lived in 14 months. Can be
seen between 6 and 8:30 P.M. Locat-
ed on Lot No. 47, Coachville Gardens
Trailer)Court, 3423 Carpenter Rd.
(U.S. 23), )B182

FOR SALE
CANON CAMERA, 1:8 lens $175. No 3-
4145, Room B-33. )B189
RARE VIOLINS
AND BOWS
ALL ACCESSORIES, STRINGS,
REPAIRS
MADDY MUSIC
508 E. Williams
NO 3-3223
)B74
TOPCOAT-Cambridge Grey. Size 38.
Call Dick Miller; NO 3-6374. )B177
FURNITURE for sale. Moving west;
must sell. Reasonable. NO 2-6474.
- )B181
PARTI ES or SNACKS
Cakes, Cookies, and Pastries.
Nothing satisfies so well
as baked goods from Campbells.
Campbell and Son Bakery
219 N. Main
Call NO 8-9880
We deliver until 1:00 P.M.
)B174
TUXEDO, size 40, excellent condition,
$30. Call NO 3-5173. )B195
BUSINESS SERVICES
FINE PHOTOGRAPHY
since 1890
Rentschler Studio
319 E. Huron
Ann Arbor's only Master Photographer
)J10
SIAMESE--Stud Service. Call Mrs. Pe-
terson, NO 2-9020. ) B136
WASHINGS - Also ironing separately.
Specialize In cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and deli-
very. Phone NO. 2-9020. )J23
EXPERIENCED Operators in Beauty
work of all kinds. Ritz Beauty Salon,
605 E. William, NO 8-7068. )J3
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
2007 South State NO 2-3350
Bumping and Painting
)J8
EXPERIENCED TYPIST in thesis, term
papers, etc. Work done on electric
typewriter. NO 2-7605. )J41
FOR RENT
FURNISHED large 3 bedroom home 3
miles northwest of courthouse. Avail-
able now until Nov. 1st. Shown by
appointment. Phone NO 3-5776. )C57
LOWER APARTMENT three years old,
unfurnished. West side, near school.
Separate utilities. Two bedrooms, tile
bath, laundry facilities. Children
welcome, but no pets. Rent $130.
Phone NO 8-7002. )C58
PARKING SPACE for rent. 603 E. Ann,
NO 2-7274 beforer12:00. ' )C55
NEWLY FURNISHE large room for
2 men, one block from campus. Also.
apartment for 3 or 4. NO 2-1443. ) C54
ACROSS FROM FERRY FIELD 2 rooms,
private bath, main floor. Inquire 1315
S. State after 6 P.M. or weekend. )C60
NEED ONE or two girls to share apart-
ment. Phone NO 8-8396. )C61

LOST AND FOUND
1 DIAMOND RING-Solitaire Diamond
in a rather simple gold setting. If
you find it would you please contact
Mary Lease, 1414 Washtenaw, NO 2-
2547. )A74
ROOMS FOR RENT'
LARGE DOUBLE for 2 men available
now. Single available 2nd semester.
1227 S. State, NO 3-1650. )D35
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-One or two-man apartment.
Furnished, with private bath. Reply
box no. 34A Michigan Daily or phone
Detroit Tulsa 3-0074. )L 9
WANTED: single room with kitchen
for 2nd semester close to Law School.
Call NO 3-0521, ext. 665. )L9
PERSONAL
WHAT ARE you .reading the personals
for? Oh, you remember - to see
when UNION MADNESS is - Febru-
ary 4, 5, 6. )F120
MAN, dig that crazy dance-- 1958 J-
Hop. )F110
GIRL WANTED to share apartment
with 2 students near campus. $40
each available for spring semester.
Call NO 5-5305. )F116
WANTED-Woman to share apartment
near campus with 2 others. Call NO
3-1416 evenings and weekends; NO
2-5517. )F117
WISH FELLOW STUDENTS to travel
in Europe. Perhaps live in Paris study-
ing 2 summer months. Plans adjust-
able. Write Box 33A, Michigan Daily.
)F104
VARIETY'S SAKE. For that occasion
reserve a fur wrap. Fur sale and
rental. Alterations and expert fitting.
Margaret Shop. NO 5-5729. )F102
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted tuxedos converted to
single breasted, $18, or new silk shawl
collar, $25. Overcoats $18. Write to
Michaels Tailoring Co., 1425 Broad-
way, Detroit, Michigan, for free de-
tails or phone WOodward 3-5776. )F1
HELP WANTED
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT, $5616 per year,
beginning salary. To head central
accounting and payroll unit for
Washtenaw County, Government.
Regular salary advancement to qual-
ified person; paid vacations, sick
leave and other employee benefits.
College degree or certificate with spe-
cialization in accounting and 3 years
experience in accounting required.
Public administration training desir-
able. Obtain applications from Coun-
ty Administration Office, Room 126,
Washtenaw County Building, Ann
Arbor, Mich. )H77
PHOTOGRAPHIC and DUPLICATING
equipment operator. Beginning salary
$3,456 per year. Female with consid-
erable office experience and mechan-
ical ability to operate duplicating,
micro-filming, a n d photographic
equipment, and central mailing unit.
Excellent opportunity to learn a re-
sponsible and satisfying job. Regular
salary advancement to qualified em-
ployee, steady work, paid vacation
and sick leave and other benefits.
Obtain application from: County Ad-
ministrator, Room 126 - Washtenaw
County Building, Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan. NOrmandy 3-2461, extension 59.
) H75
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part-
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company.
Phone NO 8-9382. ) H2O

REAL ESTATE
THE BUTTS & SWISHER CO.
REALTORS
FOR ANN ARBOR WOODS
(Washtenaw at Stadium)
Models Open -Daily -10-8f
Office 214 E. Washington - NO 3-0800
)BI
MISCELLANEOUS
Fox MOTEL
(Formerly Boyd's)
2805 E. Michigan HU 2-2204
)84
ROOMS FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE single and double rooms
in clean house, good locktion, linen
furnished. Call Jim Goldberg at NO
2-6310. )D33
SUITE OF ROOMS for four men. No
Cooking. Near campus. Call NO 8-7683
TRANSPORTATION
ATTENTION PLAYBOYS
For details of the Playboy college
tour to Mexico City during spring
vacation. Listen too "Strictly Con-
tinental" over W HRV - 1600 on your
dial Sunday, Jan. 13, 1-3 P.M. )G19
USED CARS
1948 MERCURY sedan, deluxe acces-
sories, good rubber, fenders whole,
no rust. $189. Phone NO 3-5519. )N52
1956 FORD, V-8, Ford-O-Matic, fully
equipped. $1850. Call NO 2-2783" af-
ter 6 p.m. )N32
1948 CADILLAC convertible $325
DON PRINGLE
Dodge Plymouth
331 S. Fourth Ave. )K84
USED CARS
GOOD WI LL
USED CARS
1954 CHEVROLET Del Ray two door,
radio & heater, excellent condi-
tion.
1953 FORD two door mainline, 'ra-
dio & heater, overdrive.
TRANSPORTATION SPECIAL-1952
Plymouth fordoor, radio & heater,
$265.
KLI NGLER
PONTIAC, INC.
2500 Jackson
at Stadium Blvd.
Phone NO 2-3221
Open 8:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.
)N77
SHOP AT
DOUG'S PLACE
3106 WASHTENAW AVE.
(at the sign of Speedway 79)
30 - ONE OWNER CARS
mostly low mileage
All Priced Right
from $75 up
DOUG GREGORY,
FORD SALES - World's Smallest
Large Volume Dealer
Deal with Doug - Doug'11 Deal
)N41

1

4

It

Read
Daily
Class ifieds

"I

TODAY NO____1D 6

'i

Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
M~RR

-d-"
LL'S

HELD OVER
DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER:

I

Pagno's To paze'
.brilliant Comedy
from The Michigan Daily Review

I

Gin e~n a' udld
Tonight 8:00 only
"SUSAN SLEPT HERE"
(COLOR)
With
DEBBIE REYNOLDS
DICK POWELL
Architecture Auditorium 50c

ALTHOUGH CHRISTMAS VACATION was a joyful event, the
absence from Ann Arbor sounds at least one sad note: Marcel
Pagnol's "Topaze," a theatre "must," expires this Sunday. At this
writing only three performances remain and all who enjoy a fast-
paced, brilliantly directed and tremendously funny production are

I

314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone NO 3-2481

urged to attend.
In the past, DAC's talents have shone particularly bright in
comedies and "Topaze" approaches their zenith. The cast, headed

mom "M
EAUDIEMURPHY
-ALSO-
"STAR IN THE DUST"
FRIDAY --
"MOBY DICK"
-AND-
DISNEY'S
"LITTLEST OUTLAW"
ORPH EUM
ENDING TODAY
"An icy chiller" -- Tribune
j"Last , .
word in
mnvie

STEVENS'
PRODUCTION
FROM r~_
NOVEL BY
EDNA
FERBER
~PRESENTED m WARNER "OS
iN WARNERCOLOR STARRING
F! I7ARFTH ROnCK JAMES

by Ralph Drischell as Topaze, is
magnificent; David Metcalf, the
director, milks every possible
laugh from the script and throws
in several hilarious innovations
and Hermon Baker's settings
supply near-perfect background.
"Topaze" is a story of extrava-
gant extremes, an old and tested
comedy formula, and concerns
an astonishing truthful and
naive schoolteacher at a boy's
school suddenly transported into
the corrupt mileau of French
politics and business. His trans-
formation into this new environ-
ment is the rough outline of the
action and DAC exploits this far-
cical situation to the hilt.
Good theatre can only be
achieved when details are con-
sidered.important and then mas-
tered and "Topaze" is a case in
nointh A st ca e"1InC7Co ha.

t,

x ;

LAST
PERFORMANCE
TONIEHT R 15

i

I

I1

I ~.i1~i~*'* ~ P~""..ff' 1 1.) U U?) £ 1 U I N~ ;~

01

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