100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1956 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE. TLS'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28,1996

PAGE TE?( THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1938

Art School Offers Special Course

To promote a greater awarenessV
of the problems confronting a
prospective house-buyer and of
basic design structure, a course in
interior design is offered for ju-
niors and seniors.
As part of the curriculum of the
College of Architecture and De-
sign, the course is offered once a'

year in the fall semester, specifi-
cally for students who are not ma-
joring in this type of subject.
Aimed at teaching students to
appreciate and recognize good de-
sign in home furnishings, Prof.
Catherine B. Heller, instructor of
the course, emphasized that it is

Q ANNOUNCING NEW LOCATION
of
Ii STAEBLER'S BEAUTY SALON
C
1027 East Ann, near Glen
CLOSE TO WOMEN'S DORMITORIES .
Phone NO 8-8878
- -e oc a <: <-::O C) n<--: ac.-so

. .
_ r .. ...---- j err Y +w j.
_, ;-t .
, i / !~

i

Day School Opens September 10
Night School September 11
Professional training for business positions, at a saving of time
and money. Choose one of these practical courses,,
SPEEDWRITING SECRETARIAL
STENOGRAPH ACCOUNTING
BUSINESS MACHINES STENOGRAPHIC
CLERK TYPIST
FREE PLACEMENT SERVICE. We are receiving many position offers
for each graduate.
AN OFFICE POSITION offers a good salary, opportunities for ad-
vancement, regular hours, paid vacations, and pleasant surroundings.
Early registration is advisable, especially if you are interested in
part-time work or a choice of rooming places.
PRE-MILITARY OFFICE TRAINING for young men who are sub-
ject to military service.
Ask for FREE LITERATURE
LEARN MORE about the opportunities which await you, and how
you can save time by preparing here for a job with a future. Phone,
visit our office, or mail a card today.
Hamilton Business College
Founded 1915 State and William Sts. Ph. NO 8-7831
" tit
WE LCOME
We're Ready with
All Your Needs in
Blazers
Jumpers
Slickers
Trench Coats
Boy Coats
Ann Fogarty Dresses
Dalton matching

not meant to be an interior dec-
oration course.
Textures, the importance of
line, form, and space relationships,
and awareness of color and pro-
portion, and the balanced "dy-
namic design" of today, are some
of the areas of study which are
taught in the course.
During the semester, special at-
tention is called to "the orienta-
tion of the house in relation to its
environment," Miss Heller re-
marked. One must consider such
things as "the lot, space, garden,
windows and amount 'of room
available in planining the interior
furnishings."
"This is especially true today,"
she continued, "when large win-
dow areas are possible, making the
outside seem a part of the in-
terior."
Financial Status Important
The economic situation of the
family is another important as-
pect. "Too often," Miss Heller
commented, "students plan huge
mansions with all sorts of lavish
furnishings, not even considering
that most people cannot afford to
spend that much money!"
To remedy this situation, Miss
Heller requires that the students
work within a specific budget. She
also instructs them in devices to
make houses seem larger than
they are.
Ilustrating this theory, Miss
Heller mentioned that it is neces-
sary to show how correct usage of
light and space can make a small
room appear larger. "Glass walls,
terraces, and garden areas all help
to create the visual illusion of a
larger huose."
Course Stresses Simplicity
"We especially emphasize the
importance of simplicity in design,
color and line," Miss Heller said.
"The course encourages the de-
velopment of sensitivity and ap-
preciation of good design and
brings about a greater awareness
of the furnishing materials used
today."
"Personal attention is empha-
sized," she remarked, "and to ac-
comodate this aim, we have in-
itiated a weekly consultation hour
for students to discuss their ques-
tions or problems concerning
course material or assignments."
Miss Heller stressed the flexibility
of the program, which permits
students to work where their in-
terest lies.
A pertinent fact brought up by
Miss Heller was the indirect in-
fluence of the student's contact
with the School of Architecture
and Design. "This contact in-
creases the student's awareness
of the other activities, such as
models, drawings, and exhibits,
created by students within the art
school," she said.
Work With Art School
"These students will be the fu-
ture professional designers of to-
morrow," Miss Heller continued,
"as contrasted to the students tak-
ing this non-professional course."
As she aptly phrased this influ-
ence, "The school actually be-
comes a part of their lives."
In recent years the final prob-
lem in the course has been one
which "is a specific solution of a
specific home." By selecting an
actual or hypothetical family, liv-
ing in a given home, Miss Heller
said that students learn to realize
and overcome the problems that
arise.
"They must arrange the furni-
ture in a pleasing, functional way,
which would most satisfactorily
meet family needs. "They even se-
lect the specific materials to be
used," Miss Heller added.

Students Put
Language Lab
To Good Use
University Provides
Extensive Facilities
As an Aid to Studying
Were one able to dissect the low,
steady murmer that forms the at-
mosphere of 1415 Mason Hall, he
would find it a composite of 18
different languages.
The language laboratory, equip-
ped with combination record play-
ers and earphones is the mecca for
all beginning foreign language
students who wish to learn correct
pronunciation and gain fluency in
speaking.
The aspiring student enters one
of many small booths, puts on ear-
phones, and listens to recordings
especially prepared for him by fa-
ulty members. Available in a small
library in an adjoining room, the
records are supplements to class-
work.
Study Accent Faults
In order to study his own ac-
cent faults, a language student
may also record his own voice on
tape.
About seven and a half years
ago, Prof. Lawrence Kiddle, Prof.
Charles Staubach and Prof. Ernst
Pulgram of the romance language
department planned the labora-
tory project and obtained permis-
sion to start it.
Project Growing
They initiated the project with
six pieces of machinery. Today
the lab has over 100 pieces of
equipment.
Studentsmay listen to records
in German, Latin, Polish, Italian,
Arabic, Russian, English, Greek,
Japanese, Chinese, French, Span-
ish, Swedish, Portuguese, Persian,
Turkish, Thai and Korean.
The University was one of the
first institutions in the United
States to utilize this method of
foreign language study, now adop-
ted by many other colleges.
Inter-departmental Committee
Administered by an inter-de-
partmental committee with Prof.
Otto Graf of the German depart-
ment as head, the language lab-
oratory serves the needs of all of
the University's language depart-
ments, as well as those of the Eng-
lishLanguage Institute.
The listening booths are used
approximately 3,500 times a week
including sessions. Faculty mem-
bers suggest the lab as an excel-
lent way to review vocabulary.
A section of the laboratory is
reserved from 9 am. every morn-
ing for foreign students studying
English. The lab is also open to
students who are planning trips
to other countries and wish to
familiarize themselves with the
language of that country.
Dance Classes
To Begin Soon
League dance classes for the fall
semester will begin Monday, Oct.
10, and contniue for eight weeks.
They are scheduled as follows
for the fall semester: Monday-
advanced doubles from 7:15 to
8:15 p.m. and exhibition group
from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.; Tuesday-
singles from 7:15 to 8:15 p.m. and
couples from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.;
Wednesday-singles from 7:15 to
8:15 p.m. and intermediate doubles
from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.
There will be a mass meeting
for everyone interested in the
classes on Wednesday, Oct. 5, in
the League Ballroom.

Sophomore Class Will Present Coed Show

By SUE RAUNHEIM
There is a group of students who
who can be seen around campus
waving banners, wearing unusual
hats and playing guitars.
These men and coeds are Enthu-
siastically working on a new pro-
ject, the Soph Show, which will
be held Thursday through Satur-
day, Nov. 15, 16 and 17.
The show, a full length musical
play has main parts, chorus lines
and various committees which
sophomores may work on.
Mass Meeting
The first mass meeting and try-
out will be held at 7:30 p.m. Mon.,
Sept. 24 in the League.
At this time students can sign
up for committees and tryout for
various parts.
This is the first time on the
University campus that the men
and women of the Sophomore
class are combining their time
and talents to produce a musical.
Formerly Soph Scandals
The idea of a coed show grew
out of the former Soph Scandals
which was a production sponsored
by the Women's League and pro-
duced solely by the women of the
sophomore class.
This year, after the completion
of Soph Scandals, the coeds got
together and decided the show
might have more appeal and also
be more fun if it were a coed pro-
ject.
A few males were selected from
the Interfraternity Council and
Inter-House Council to aid in set-
ting up this new project. Using the
profits from last year's show, the
enthusiastic group began formu-
lating plans last January.
First Turnout Good
After they were fully organized,
they publicized a mass meeting
for all prospective sophomores.
This turnout was an excellent one
and the chairmen, Nancy Brecht
and Hank Kerr expressed their
pleasure at seeing so many stu-
dents interested in the project.
At this mass meeting, announce-
ment was made of the shows pro-
gress so far and positions open for
petitioning were explained. Be-
sides general chairmen, the com-
mittees were secretary, treasurer,
directors, p r o d u c t i o n, dance,
script, costumes, makeup, publi-
city, music and programs.
Each of the committees offered
an opportunity for a male and
coed to assume responsibility.
Central Committee Chosen
In May, the new central com-
mittee were chosen with Nancy
Brecht and Hank Kerr as general
co-chairman. Included on the
committee were Sandy Russell,
Jordan Lewis, Lois Curtis, Bruce
Hoffman, Shirley Hutte, Robert
Gantzos, Judy Harbeck, Scott
Florence, Jean Wiloughby, Byron
Gold, Pat Kelley, Robert Arnove,
Liz Erskine and Wayne Townsend.
The new committee decided that
they needed professional aid in
making this new project a suc-
cess. A contract was drawn up and
signed by Ted Heusel, a profes-
sional director who has worked

with many summer stock compa-
nies. The student directors, Gretel
Bailey and Jim Richman, will still
have full authority plus the ad-
vantage of professional advice
when they need it.
Spark Plug
Last spring, the publicity com-
mittee established a representa-
tive system, A member was se-
lected from every housing unit
on campus to be the spark plug
in his house or dorm. It is the
duty of every representative to
make sure that everyone knows
what the show is and what oppor-
tunities it affords interested soph-
omores.
The Central Committee of Soph
Show urges everyone to take some
small part in it. They feel that
this will enable sophomores to
get to know each other.
The planning committee and
the central committee of Soph
Show are both enthusiastic. They
know the possibilities the show
has of becoming not only the first
coed :lass project but a very suc-
cessful venture.
They urge all sophomores to at-
tend the next mass meeting at
7:30 p.m. Mon., Sept. 24 in the
League.

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

. ... ...,..:.4.A.M. li.::.4,:..:iN+Y. 1:.rQ 5.v.wc .. ....,wsA..w...,...... ... . . . . . . . .
Thatetthfac
withreatnameCinmposwearion
LANZ SACONY
PATTY WOODARD LYLE SCOTT SWEATERS
NARDIS OF DALLIS IIOGG OF HA WICK SWEATERS
COLLEGETOWN SPORTSWEAR DAK SKIRTS
r<:WESTHOUSE ROCKLAND SPORTSWEAR
n.GRAFF BLOUSES GABBEY SHIRTS
LOWER LEVEL SPORTSHOP
STORE HouRS: Monday through Saturday 9:30-5:30
InoosoFdor n a omlgatserngs
for gretrsaretainng esc . longrS ea
atinY ates.Lo forDAhandL d CetTiin toEAT
tii K:i":{:" .ARD}IiS+: OF DA i}l l: { ;ir~,..c iX.S£. HOGG OF Hr:'ii'ti" i.i;~i'AWX5'',:iK SWEAryTE"r::':tTS v
a3i"a3","a+ ,".3 ~C"it2.:i : L.1EGv2Y1" xETOW."n^. SPO4:R i d<?JTiiSWEA i3 ." +v44ri DAK SK.i n.{+vvXTS ..: .Y\+r,"
,": r: " ":4i4 + E:S. rn :tP.n"" "Y:Ttq ' .".Y::"THO ROC :K:lAND S"f: RT.^ WEA*
? "}:i;a~x:tiC:. 2,.Fo:: , G+:53,. RA FF BL: OU..: SES GABB :{ ;. 4.:3a:.:.,; ;;},r. .......::":.4.Y:S \iy i.;:c:TS '',""a
4ai n+6 Cr::nii. i."? +~'+". .i.yiOW.i.{:\iE R:."": n~l L E";:i :v E~i}""X}%:.uL:"":v}SPO RTS H OP: .:x. ."$f<r:i:nv:: "i'f~"f+:'r r
J K on: odytrug audy :053
YY
y 1 rcmoi o e wt eag-os
Mt e rm otpla _ atercaeu y 1ttce
fo geaershpereaiin rsiiece. O.loge

lasting smartness. Look for hand detailing to be
found only in the most expensive shoes-fine styling.
Beffer try a pair today.

v ) I

I

-Daily-Vern Soden
ENTHUSIASM-Banners wave as students publicize
new project, Soph Show.

i

Read
Daily

Cl

lassif ieds

''gtT 4 ::fY:i}tr~T t.; }':G;t{.;.. . . . . . . . ...i t iS{4 TF d' -, ";,., .ii

WELCOME STUDENTS
OLD FRIENDS & NEW!

r<
>w?
t
V* :
i
fi
+{tiy
4:":.
r j".
{ti
1f,}
ryA i:

Cashmeres

&

Skirts

and oodles of other skirts,
sweaters, shirts, dresses, coats
and accessories. Come in and
Just show your I.D.
0 i ArmWbya r 1

MAIN SHOP
on Forest
Just off South U.
of
( m
&

CAMPUS TOGS
1111 South U.
2 Blocks from Main Shop

Y

E'RE READY with an exciting collection
Fall Fashions for Back to Campus-Dra.
atically different separates for class, movie
soda dates; afternoon dresses for Rushing

"1 i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan