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September 20, 1956 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-20

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1956

THE MICUIGAN DAILY

University Radio Programs
To Teach Children Music
An estimated 25,000 elementaryl
school children will participate WFUM Flint, then immediately

PAGE NI"
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this year in the annual Festival
of Song, produced by the Univer-
sity radio stations, WUOM -and
WFUM.
The Festival of Song is a com-
plete course in vocal music, taught
by radio for elementary school
children in their classrooms.
Beginning her third year as
teacher of the course is Miss
Edythe M. Albert, an instructor in
music education at the University
music school.
Miss Albert, who holds a master's
degree in music education from
the University of Colorado, was for
11 years supervisor of school music
in the Iowa public schools, and
then an instructor in music edu-
cation and supervisor of music in
the Laboratory School of the State
Teacher's College at Bemidji, Mich.
She joined the University facultyE
in 1954.
The half-hour, twice-weekly
Festival broadcasts are produced
and aired by the University's radiot
stations, WUOM Ann Arbor and

tape recorded and distributed to
some 20 commercial stations in
Michigan for rebroadcast in their
[areas.
Originally developed as a service
to rural schools, the Festival has
since been expanded to a number
of city areas. It last year reached
about 13,000 children, a figure
which is expected to be nearly
doubled in the coming series,
scheduled to begin on October 3.
To aid in the instruction, teach-
ers in the participating schools
are supplied' with a manual and
pupils with a songbook, both pro-
duced here and distributed at cost.
Architect School
To Celebrate Start
Some 350 architects and design-
ers from throughout the United
States will convene here October
24 and 25 to commemorate the 50th
anniversary of the University's
College of Architecture and De-
sign.

-Daily-Larry Carbonelli
SUSPENDED MOBILES-Wire and plane surfaces form modern
work now hanging from the ceiling of an Alumni Memorial Exhibit
Hall.

---Daily-Larry Carbonelli
SQUAT STRUCTURES-Calder designed the immobile "stabile"
as well as the more popular "mobile."

Museum Exhibit of Calder 'Epitome' of Mobile Art

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By JOHN WEICHSEL
Everyone has seen the colorful
advertisements hanging in the
corner grocery store, plugging
beer, or gracing an airlines ticket
office or automobile show room,
decoratively urging one to fly
or buy.
WUOM To Use
New System
In Stadium
WUOM,' the University radio
station, will open its ninth year
of Michigan sports coverage this
fall with the institution of an im-
proved, streamlined system of
broadcasting home football games.
With the use of the facilities of
the newly constructed press box
at the stadium, WUOM will be
able to do away with the annoy-
ing cluster of microphones in front
of the band and the numerous
field and crowd mikes.
A pool system will be used this'
year, employing only one sensitive
parabolic microphone atop the
press box and one band mike.
These will be installed and oper-
ated by WUOM, but will serve all
the stations broadcasting the
game.
Football broadcasts this season
will be carried by a total of 20 sta-
tions throughout Michigan, in-
cluding the University's own
WUOM and WF(UM.
Local sportscaster will be Bill
Stegath of WUOM, aided by sta-
tistician John Sargent, spotter
Bill Carey, color announcer Ed
Burrows and three engineers.
In addition to the play-by-play
broadcasts, WUOM will air a
weekly 15-minute program, the
Wolverine Sports Report, which
will feature rebroadcasts of excit-
ing play-by-play highlights of last
year's game with the same oppo-
nent. This is scheduled for Fri-
days at 4:45 p.m.

in capable hands; for one gener-
ally knows of the mobile only
through the implements of com-
merce.
Concept of Mobile Old
But the ad men did not origin-
ate the phenomenon which seems
made just for them, nor did any
contemporary artist. The scien-
tific concept of the mobile is as
old as the scale or the see-saw.
Rather the modern artist has
utilized the scientific phenomenon
in his artistic concepts. The mobile
became an innovation when the
artist first utilized the age-old
phenomenon of balance in his
artistic concepts.
Alexander Calder is recognized
both by artists and public as one
of the first to integrate successful-
ly the scientific and esthetic. To
speak of him as the originator of
the mobile is false. One cannot
draw so decisive and immovable
a line.
Calder Connotes Mobile
But Calder connotes the mobile
as the Wright Brothers do the air-
plane.
His work, on view at the Mu-
seum of Art in Alumni Memorial
Hall now until October 14, ex-
presses the epitome of the mo-
bile. While others may have pro-
duced greater works of mobile art,
none have created more success-
fully the delight of pure move-
ment and form in a three dimen-
sional media.
Calder's first mobiles and sta-
biles were done in 1930-31. Today
he is internationally known as the
founder and leader of the "mobile"
sculpture movement.
Each. form balances another
form or a group of forms, the en-
tire structure eventually sus-
pended from a single strand at-
tached to the museum ceiling.
Some mobiles squat on spiny

These are the more well known legs like giant insects perched for the hippopotamus.
examples of a recently popularized a moment before springing at the Calder's mobiles remind the vis-
"art form" known as the mobile. vistior. One huge work crouches itor to this exhibit of a kaleido-
The advertising world has taken indolently on the floor of the Cal- scope. One must but stand and
the mobile and is using it for all it der-filled room, its black bulk con- look at this mutable sculpture and
can sell, Used in this manner, it is trasting with the white forms he is confronted by infinite varia-

...... . .............
#'

floating about it like flys about ( tions of color and form.
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION:
Students Given Reduced Rate
For Lecture Series Tickets
The University Oratorical Association's annual Lecture Course
enters its 103rd year this season with an impressive schedule of lec-
tures and discussions in drama and world affairs, featuring some of
the most prominent figures in those fields.
Two pre-Broadway performances are scheduled for early fall.
October 24 Constance Bennett, Robert Strauss, Tod Andrews and
Frank McHugh will present a pro-C_
gram of "The Best of Steinbeck"
and on November 1, noted British
comedienne Joyce Grenfell will be

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seen in an evening of comedy and
music.
Others in the series include such
world-renowned personalities as
Dr. Ralph Bunche, Undersecretary
of the United Nations; Clement
Attlee, former British Prime Min-
ister and Labor Party leader; Ivy
Baker Priest, Treasurer of the
United States; and Gen. A, C.
4Wedemneyer, former commanding
general, United States Army, Chi-
na theater.
In addition, there will be pre-
sentations f e a t u r i n g Barbara
Ward, British author and editor
and Marquis Childs, prominent
journalist and author.
Students and their wives will
again enjoy a special low rate on
season tickets: $3.50 for second
balcony unreserved seats.
Tickets are now on sale at the
Hill Auditorium box office from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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