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December 12, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-12

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, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER.I2, 1956

TNT MCMGAN DAILY

PAGE -THREE

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAITA PAGE THREE

Professors
Praise New
Credits Plan
By DIANE LABAKAS ;
Three University professors ex-
pressed approval of the literary
college's new advanced standing
credit program for superior high
school students.
The program, passed by the col-
lege faculty last week, give's credit
to high school students who have
taken special courses and passed a
stiff examination to receive col-
lege credit in the fields of English
composition, history, mathematics,
foreign language, physics, chemis-
try and biology.
"The program is one we can
have confidence in because of the
superior quality of the student!
and of the Educational Testing
Service people giving the exam,"
Prof. John Weimer of the English
department said.
Excused from Work
"These students will be excused
from work they do not need in
terms of overall education and will
be ready to proceed to something
more challenging." he declared.
Prof. Weimer asserted that the
department's standards would not
be raised because rigorous exami-
nations would limit the number of
entering freshmen.
Prof. Howard M. Ehrmann,
chairman of the history depart-
ment, favored the program be-
cause he said it might not only
increase the number of superior
students in a department but
would enable students to take more
advanced work earlier in their
programs.
"Despite the number of honor
programs and related courses,
more should be done for the
superior student' than we have
been doing," Prof. Ehrmann de-
clared.
Warning
He warned, however, that a
failure to maintain high. standards
in the high school courses and
qualifying examinations could de-
feat the purpose of the program.
"A student's lack of maturity
could be another drawback," Prof.
Ehrmann noted, "because maturity
is an important factor in many
advanced history courses. Experi-
ence will tell whether these stu-
dents are mature enough to com-
pete."
Prof. T. H. Hildebrandt, chair-
man of the mathematics depart-
ment, declared that the program
would "elevate the student to
higher levels so he does not have
to bide his time while the teacher
tries to plan something for the
dumbest member in the class."
He cited high school teaching as
the program's chief- flaw. "Most
high school teachers do not have
the ability or background to teach
college courses," he explained.
Stott To. Speak
Rev. John Stott will deliver the
second in his series of lectures at
8 p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
hall.
The topic will be "What is Sin?"
Rev. Stott will be introduced by
Roscoe O. Bonsteel, a member of
the Board of Regents.
Rev. Stott's series of lectures
are sponsored by the Michigan
,. Christian Fellowship.

DETROIT AREA STUDY:
Political Organizations, Effects Being Studied

Industrialists Hold Discussion
On Several Drugs' Effects

Social implications of the use

By RONALD PARK
Since 1951 the Detroit Area
Study has been trying to find out
what makes a large urban com-
munity tick.
Each year a major aspect of1
Detroit area life is chosen for
study. This year the subject is
political organizations and their
effect on the voters. Special em-!
phasis is being placed on the pre-!
cinct worker since he is the lastI
link between a political party and
the voter.
Why does a citizen become a
precinct worker? What reward
does he receive for his labors?
How did people vote in the 1956]
election and why? What affect
did campaign techniques have on
their decisions? These are some
of the questions the Study hopes
to answer.
Groundwork
Groundwork for this year's study
began last summer. This semester
the 27 students in the project
have worked on the questions, pre-
testing the schedule, interviewer
training and sample elections.
By the middle of February the
interviewing portion will be com-
pleted. Then IBM machines will
tabulate the results.
Sometime next spring the infor-
mation will be submitted for an-
alysis to Prof. Daniel Katz of the
psychology department, and Prof.
Samuel Eldersveld of the political
science department, faculty repre-

sentatives on the project. The others in the home may be eager,
staff of Detroit Area Study will to be interviewed. It is not un-1
then start planning for next year's usual to make eight or 10 calls at'
rn i ah a home before an interview is ob-

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researcrr . 1V~
Graduate students seeking their tained.
masters in sociology constituteI
the bulk of personnel in the Study. The
A majority of these students have! sample
received degrees in sociology, but Featur
students from other departments be che
are also participating. showt
wrong

Accurate Sample
Study has found their
to be extremely accurate.
es of the sample which can!
cked with census figures
the sample rarely to beI
by more than one or two

Voters

W per cent. V ;Hl VA. lU

The most intensive portion of hp r ca d h".k b
the interviewing, that of the voters, i h Sharp called this remarkablet
will be done between the first and: in vit of the factthat ponl abu
second semesters. Students will 800 out of the 3,000,000. people inj
se1 dsmses tdnswl the Detroit area are interviewed."
stay in a Detroit hotel with offices te
in the Detroit Rackham building. He listed three main objectives;
Expenses during the interviewing for his group. One is "to obtain
are paid by the Detroit Area Study. information on a major urban
By the "probability" sampling community." Secondly, "to pro-
method, which gives each citizen vide students with adequate train-
and each precinct in Detroit an; ing in sociological methods."
equal or known chance of being Thirdly, "to be of service to the
picked, 85 precincts have been community."
chosen for survey. One member He continued, "We try to make
from six different families in each our research as objective and
precinct will be interviewed. valid as we can. In years past
most of sociological research has

1
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t
E

Both political parties in Michi- of tranquilizer drugs by industrial A suggestion was maae to set
gan have approved of this year's workers, the necessity for caution up study programs to investigate
study. John Feikens, Republican against the frequent use of peni- tranquilizers as well as other be-
State Chairman, and Neil Staebler, cilin as a "cure all" and t havior affecting drugs now being
Democratic State Chairman, have effects oi nerve-blocking drugs developed.
written letters which can be pre- used in the control of high blood Also discussed were the allergic
sented to precinct workers urging pressure were the topics of dis- reactions of penicillin and several
their cooperation. cussion of 40 large industrial or- other drugs. One doctor noted
The Detroit Area Study, located ganizations in the United States that the chance for receiving peni-
in the Institute for Social Re- and Canada. cillin through the meat of in-
search, is financed by the Uni- The discussion was conducted: jected cattle and their products
versity through the sociology de- by the University's Institute of may be enough to give a reaction
partment and by the Ford Foun- Industrial Health in cooperation to a sensitive person.
dation. It is associated with the with the public health school. Another doctor warned against
Survey Research Center. Although tranquilizers have only the use of nerve blocking drugs
Thus the students were able to been on the market a few years, for people with hypertension in
'work with experienced personneliit was noted that they are the jobs which involve the safety of
Sharp commented, "In general, fourth most popular prescription themselves or others as these
therstu enttebIn er- category. drugs may cause dizziness.
the students do the job of inter- ____ __ _____________
viewing as capably as the profes-
'sional interviewer. They have
worked very hard on this study."
Sharp indicated the surveys have
been well received in the Detroit
area. "Our non-response rate is
only about 10 out of 100 people..
and of that 10, five are either illrL J 1 ).L1(
or on vacation. Our interviewers
find that most people are very
kind and considerate."
Vvrin uu ncanreuu r7 nru u ia

-I

IAn essential feaure of this type
of survey is interviewing only the
person chosen in advance. A wife
cannot be substituted for a hus-
band who is away.
Harry Sharp, Director of the
Study, indicated recently that it
is difficult for the interviewer to
keep calling at the address for a
certain person, especially whenf

4

been in small towns because they
were easy to study.
Few Studies
"Study of a large urban com-
munityjust isn't done very much,"
Sharp said. "Although conditions
are not as perfect as those of a
laboratory, so little is known of
metropolitan communities that
our work is valuable."

various agencies and organiza-
tions frequently ask for past sur-
vey results. A mailing list of 400
to 500 people is supplied with in-
formation about once a month, an
attempt to make use of the pro-
duct of this study on the problems
of urban life,

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