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December 08, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-08

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AY, DECEMBER 8,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TECR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THItEE

.......... mom..W.

I

Wolverine (
Kramer Scores 18 Points;
Guards Spark Late Surge

ia ers

Beaten by

Wichita,

81-76

in 'Sy
Round Trip via
Steamship $jf
FREQENTSAIL0GS V UV

'M' Pucksters Open Home Season:

Meet University of Toronto Tonight

U'

fi Special To The Daily
WICHITA-Michigan droppeda
close game to a strong Wichita five
last night, 81-76, despite a des-
perate last minute effort to close
the gap.
The Wolverines never lead a
any pointjin the game as th
Shockers jumped to a 8-3 lea
after six minutes of play.

RON KRAMER
. back to form?

At half-time the Blue were only
atrailing by eight points, 43-~35.:
eThree minutes before the inter-
- mission the Michigan cagers were
e behind, 41-28, but they made an.
all out effort to catch the Shock-
ers, before the half-time buzzer#
sounded. A couple of quick layups
by Pete Tillotson and Randy Tar-I
rier helped narrow the gap.
Controlled Ball
The Wolverines controlled the
ball for most of the final three
minutes of the first half and nar-
rowed the margin still further on<
a couple of set shots from beyond
the keyhole.
In the second half the Maize}
and Blue couldn't continue their;
inspired plal' of the final minutes
of the first half and the Wichita;
cagers again widened their gap.
Michigan's promising sopho-
mores, George Lee and M. C. Bur-
ton shook their jitteriness of theC
first half to give sterling perform-s
ances in the second half, Lee scor-
ing 14 points.
Ron Kramer, captain of the ALL-AMERICAN GOALIE-Lorne Howes, Mi
Wolverines, played an all around wLL AEIh NsOLtE-Worne.osti
game, shining on defense, board will be in the nets for the Wolverines tonight as
control and offense, scoring 18 Toronto team which lost to Michigan Tech lasi
points. The fact that the margin Howes has been called the greatest goalie in
of loss was not greater was largely
due to Kramer's aggressive of fen- GAMES TO CLOSE TODAY:
sive playing, making .a bucket or____________________
grabbing a rebound when it was:
most needed.
In a final effort to catch the Mek R ose
Shockers, the Wolverines poured
all their energy into the game as E
IMELBOURNE (A)-The Mel-
time began running out. Trailing bourne Olympic Games formally superbly con
73-59 with only five minutes left close today with Pat McCormick won his thirc
they started an offensive rally I of Los Angeles established as un- games by
/that brought them within fourdisputed, but retiring queen of world recor
points of their opponents, the diving boards, and a handsome Breen, in the
Harrassing the Wichita team 17-year-old Australian, Murray race. The thri
with down-court defensive press- Rose, king of modern swimmers. and enduran
make the score 79-'73 with two The "Star Spangled Banner" house to its f
minutes left to play. They could rang out for the last time last stadium.
not get any closser than this how- night for the magnificent Mrs. Mc-
ever, and a bucket for the Shock- Cormick who completed an un- Unoff
ers in the waning moments of the precedented Olympic "double dou-
contest clinched it for them. ble" by leading' an all-American rp int
Billy Wright, guard, hit for 16 sweep in the women's platform
points, 14 of them coming in the diving competition. Russia
second half. Juno Irwin of Glendale, Calif., United Stat
petite mother of three, finished Australia
second and Paule Jean Myers of Germany
jl° Glendora, Calif., was third in a Hngr
H I"N IUIU A r ,i , s ,brilliant display off the tower tay
boards. Russia Leads Great Brita
sefter Games Sweden
The United States ended its Japan
competition with 593 points and France
second place in the unofficial team Czechosloval
since they left more than a month race, behind Russia's 712-point to- Turkey
ago. tal. The Spviets have captured 36 _
Many of the athletes, who gold medals to 32 for the Ameri- _
fought in the early days of the Oc- cans and could add another gold

Hockey season is here again as
Michigan's defending NCAA
champs open their 1956-57 sched-
ule tonight at 8:00 against the
University of Toronto on home
ice.
Tickets for the contest went on
sale yesterday morning, and can
be purchased today at the Athletic
Administration ticket office, or
tonight at the rink. Tickets for
Monday's game with Toronto are
also on sale.
Experience
Coach Vic Heyliger will be
starting a strong, experienced unit
plus one sophomore against the
Canadian visitors. In the goal for
Michigan will be senior Lorne
Hower, whose excellent play last
year won him All-American hon-
ors.
In front of him will be Captain
Bob Pitts and Bob Schiller, senior
defensemen who were regular
starters last year. Schiller was also
an All American. The front line
will feature juniors Tom Rendall,
Michigan's third 1955-56 All Am-
erican, and Don McIntosh, and
with them, newcomer John Hut-
ton.
Rendall was the Woverines' top

scorer last year, pushing in 21I
goals and collecting 14 assists. Mc-
Intosh, who played on both the'
first and second line collected four
goals and 16 assists in his play
last season.
Michigan's opponents, coached
by Jack Kennedy, are described as
the most powerful group of hockey
players to represent Toronto in
several years.
Leading the Blues will be right
wing Ken Linesman, who took the
scoring honors in- his league last
year with 18 goals and 13 assists.

He is ably suported by Clare Fish-
er at left wing and center Brian
Anderson, elected team's most
valuable player last year.
By the time they arrive in Ann'
Arbor, Toronto will have four
games under its belt. They have
already defeated Montreal and
McGill University.
They have also split a two-game
series with Michigan Tech, losing,
5-4. and winning, 2-0.
NHL SCORE
Montreal 3, Chicago 1

Tourist Round Trip Air
$46080 In season
tower rates for groups on charters
and for 17-doy excursions
Choice of Over 140
STUDENT TOURS
TRAVEL STUDY TOURS
University Travel Co., official
bonded agents for all lines, has
rendered efficient travel service
on a business basis since 1926.
See your local travel agent for
folders and details or write us.
....,.,. elM~eMM8*E

...
T--

Come

to Church

Sunday

chigan goal tender
they face a strong
t Friday night, 5-4.
Wolverine history.

k

Statisti
MICHIGAN FG
Burton, f .-.....2
Tarrier, --'..-3
Tillotson, c.....3
Kramer, c ......7
Lee, g..........8 1 17
Shearon, g .1....2
Wright, g .....7
WICHITA FU
Mann, c .......2
Coin, c.........1
Rofoeitcher, g ..1
Lock, g .........6
Woodward, f ....5
Wessell, c .... .3 9
Stephens, g ....7
Duwyer, f......:1
Schwartzkoff, f 1

0
Gcs
FT
4
1
2
4
1
0
2

FT
12
0
2
3
2'
3
5
0
0

TP
18
17
2
16
TP
16
2
4
15
12
19-
2
2

nditioned youngster,
d gold' medal of the
upsetting America's
d holder, George
1,500-meter freestyle
Illing contest of speed
ce brought a packed
eet at the swimming
cial Team.
Standin gs
712
es 593
278%/
223
22011.
185
ain 180V2
164
139
120 2
kia 712
61

Breen, 21-year-old American
champion from "Buffalo, N. Y.,
who had set a world record of 17
minutes, 52.9 seconds in prelimi-
nary trials, faded badly and fin-
ished third behind Takeshi Yama-
naka of Japan.
Rose's time Friday night was
17:58.91 Yamanaka was timed in
18:00.3 and Breen in 18:08.3.
Two Gold Medals
Lorraine Crapp of Australia won
her second gold medal in the wo-
men's 400-meter freestyle, beating
out Dawn Fraser, a teammate, and
Shirley Ruuska of Berkeley, Calif.,
who finished third.
In the only other championship
contested during the day, Ercole
Baldini of Italy finished first in
the Olympic cycling road race.
There is only one more gold
medal to be contested and that is
the football soccer prize which
sends Russia's powerful Dynamo
team against the Yugoslavs to-
day at the Melbourne Cricket
Ground.

Gather More Honors

Outlook for
Indefinite A
MELBOURNE (P)-Eighty-two,
IHungarian Olympic athletes and
officials yesterday flew into a fu-
ture clouded by uncertainty and
doubt.
In about 48 hours many of the
questions about their fates and
destinations will have been an-
swered. For those who receive
news that families await them in
Austria it probably will mean the
beginning of a new life outside the
Iron Curtain.
For those who find no happy
word awaiting them it will mean
a return to their war-torn land,
which has been soaked in blood
Red Athletes
Gain Accolade
MOSCOW (MP) - Soviet athletes
were the darlings of Moscow Fri-
day as all the newspapers reported
they had taken the lead from the
Untied States in the Olympic
Games at Melbourne.
Gone. was any hint of criticism
of the athletes and trainers which1
was evident when the Soviet team
was trailing the Americans. In-
stead the headlines proclaimedj
Thursday as "Golden Thursday of
Soviet Sport."
Komsomol Pravda, organ of the
Communist youth which earlier in
the week criticized the Soviet!
team and trainers for poor show-
ings, switched quickly to full
praise.
t

tober revolution against Soviet
domination last night wore the
emblem of the Hungarian revolu-
tion proudly on their breast pock-
ets. They knew there were Com-
-munist agents among them, sing-
ling them out for future reference.
Hungary Fifth
According to unofficial tabula-
tions Hungary's water polo cham-
pionship meant that they had
finished fifth among all the com-
peting nations on an Olympic
point scoring basis. The Hungar-
ians scored 220/ points, losing out
in a close battle for fourth place
with Germany, which totaled 223.
For eight of Hungary's water
poloists their Olympic champion-
ship was the end of a sporting
chapter /and the beginning of a
new puzzling future. They have
decided not to return to Hungary
but work their way towards Am-
erica.
Today another 60 Hungarians
are scheduled to fly toward Milan.
But that leaves open the mystery
of the other 33 of the 175 who
came to Melbourne in mid-No-
vember.
Originally, 91 Hungarians were
to fly home last night. But of-
ficials of the French charter air-
liner taking the team to Italy said
a change of manifest was re-
quested by Hungarian officials
Thursday.

medal Saturday as they enter the
soccer final favored over the Yugo-
slavian team.
Mrs. McCormick, 26, and also a
mother, thus added the high dive
to her previously won springboard
title and matched the double vic-
tory she achieved four years ago
in Helsinki.
"This was my last competitive
dive," she said afterward. "Now I
plan to attend to the business of
being a housewife."
Earlier in the evening Rose, a

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Mr..C. H. Loucks and Mr. D. Day, Ministers.
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Ma hone.
9:45 A.M. Bible class studies 11 Samuel.
11:00 A.M. The sermon is "Written and Living"
by Rev. Day.
6:45 P.M. Miss Doris Rumman will present "The
Land of Christmas."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
9:30 and 10:45: Worship services, with sermon
by the pastor, "Wholesome Words Indeed!"
(Universal Bible Sunday)
6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Club,
Fellowship Supper followed by Christmas pro-
gram and party.
SAINT CLARE OF ASSISSI MISSION
EPISCOPAL
2305 Packard Road
Reverend Phillip L. Schenk
Phone: NO 2-4663
10:00 A.M. Sunday Services.
10:00 AM. Church School.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10.45 A.M. Meetings for Worship.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends Meeting
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 12
noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M. Newman Club Rooms in the Father Rich-
ard Center.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Worship. Dr. Merrill
P. Abbey will speak on "A Christian Manuel
of Arms."
9:30 to 10:30 A.M. Two discussion groups. "The
History of the Hebrew People" and "The
Bible and Christian Living."
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Student Panel
discussing "The Revelence of the Bible."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
6:00 P.M. Supper
7:00 P.M. Speaker: Mr. Sundur Anantham, Lu-
theran Graduate Student from India.
THURSDAY
9:30 P.M. Vespers.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays 10:00 A.M. -- 11:00 A.M. - 7:30
P.M.
Wednesdays 7:30 P.M. Bible Study. Ministers,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Hearld of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays 5:00 to 5:30 P.M.
For transportation to Service-Dial NO 3-5134.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:15 A.M, Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service, "Living Word of
God." Sermon by Mr. Arthur Zillgitt.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizengo, Minister
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY
Three Morning Worship Services. 9:00, 10:30
and 12:00 noon
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "What We Believe and
Why."
11:30 A.M. Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Forum: "Directed or
Adrift-the Nation."
TUESDAY
4:15 P.M. "Question Box" Discussion, Pat Pick-
ett's apartment, 21 7 5. Observatory
5-6 P.M. Coffee Break, Pat Pickett's aparthnent.-
THURSDAY
4-6 P.M. Coffee Break Pat Pickett's apartment.
217 S. Observatory
4:15 P.M. Bible Study, "The Chosen Peoples,"
League.
FRIDAY
6:30 P.M. Graduate Dinner, Lewis Room.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Cormunion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon fol-
lowed by a Student Breakfast at the Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
4:00 P.M. Graduate Canterbury
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper
7.00 P.M. Lecture Series Speaker will be Dean
Debra Bacon, Dean of Women, University of
Michigan.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testinmonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339
South Main St Reading Room hours are Mon.,
11:00 A.M to 9:00 P.M. Tues.-Sat. 11:00
A.M. to 5 P.M.; and Sun. 2:30 to 4:30 PM.

d

f
I
i
I
i
_n
i
I,_
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I

ATTENTION
FEBRUARY GRADUATES
Gel Your
Graduation Announcements
It -. ' - I A 'IAE

E

HAIR GROOM PLASTIC'!
T O N ICGrooms your hair while it treats your
scalp. Controls loose dandruff. 1.00
plus tax
SHULTON New York * "Toronto

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
All departments of the Church School meet at
10:45 A.M. At the service of Public Worship
at 10:45 A.M., Prof. Preston W. Slosson will
speak on the subject: "Greater Works Shall
He Do,. . ." The Rev. Harry Kellogg will
conduct the service.
Pilgrim Felldwshir Potluck and social program in
Pilgrim Hall at 5:30 P.M
Student Guild at 7:00 P.M Speaker, Mr. Hugh
Gaston on: "What Makes or Breaks a Mar-
..:- I'

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M.>Unitarian Church school.
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Discussion Group-Prof.
Robert Horton, Epidemiologist in the School of
Public Health, will speak on "The Stranger's
Cold Phenomenon."
11 A.M. Services of Worship. Rev. Edward H.
Redman will speak on "What About God?"
11 A.M. Junior High LRY Group.
7 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Miss Kaye
Schumacher and Mr. Carl Nielsen, who traveled
in Europe in 1955 and 1956 respectively, will
show slides of their trips and give talks on
Liberal Religious Youth in Europe." Transpor-
tation to the church available at 6:45 from the
Michigan Union, Lane Hall and Stockwell Hall.
Mon., Dec. 10: Laymen's League will meet at
8:00 at the home of Dr. Robert Hunter, 1302
Washtenow Terrace.
Wed. Der 12: Fvenina Alliance will meet at R15

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