100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 05, 1956 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


TOE MICHIGAN DAILY

SECTION TWt J

SNOWSTORM SHOOTING MOST EFFECTIVE:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SECTION TWO-

Rev. John Stott To Lecture

Win tei
By JOHN HIRTZEL
Daily Chief Photographer
With the first snowfall of the
year comes the sparkle and en-
chantment of white magic trans-
forming commonplace scenes into
a photographer's paradise.
When snow lies thick alongp
country roads and ice, glistens on
city streets - that is the time to
take a camera and go outdoors.
Winter offers unlimited oppor-
tunities for making good pictures,
pictures that interpret as well as
portray the wonderland of snow.
These opportunitiesare near at
hand.
One need only to look to his own
front yard, around the corner, or
the nearest park.
The only requirement is an eye
to see and the technical'ability to
translate what is seen and felt
into a photographic record.
First, a word about equipment.
Almost any type of camera will{
serve; even the most inexpepsive1
fixed-focus models can yield ex-
cellent results when lighting con-
ditions are right.
Expensive Cameras Are Flexible
Of course, the more expensive
types of cameras provide greater
flexibility. A reflex camera, eith-
er single or twin lens is one of the
better varieties offered in the ex-
pensive camera bracket. The
groundglass focusing offered by
reflex 'cameras is a must for good
composition.
A camera requires special 'care

Provides

'Paradise

fr Cameramen

.- c

Rev. John Stott, Rector of All
Souls Church, London, England,
will deliver five lectures to Michi-
gan Christian Fellowship meet-
ings this month.
Lectures, set for 8 p.m., Dec. 10-
14, in Rackham Amphitheatre, will
be entitled "What Think Ye of
Christ?"

OUT IN THE OPEN
. . ski shots are effective
if the temperature is below freez-
ing. Condensation on the lens is
likely to take place when a cam-
era is taken into a warm room
from the cold outside air. For this
same reason it isn't wise to carry
a camera inside a shirt or .wind-
breaker where body heat may fog
up the lens.
It's a good idea to let the cam--
era become "acclimatized" by sev-
eral minutes exposure to the cold
air before using.
Hands Need Protection
Operating a camera is difficult
while wearing gloves, but protec-
tion is-needed for the hands. A
helpful trick is to cut the tips off
wool gloves. This allows the lens
and shutter to be adjusted easily,

and still offers the hands some1
protection.
It is true that brilliant pictures
are best achieved in bright sun-
light; nevertheless, exciting win-
ter mood pictures can be made
during stormy or overcast days.
A camera needs all the protec-
tion it can get while being used in
a snowstorm; a lens shade alone
may notbe enough. If the services
of a friend can be enlisted, have
him hold an umbrella over the
camera. Lacking such aid, a door-
way or some other covered spot
should yield sufficient protection
from the snow.
Shooting Snowstorms
There are two ways to shoot a
snowstorm, each producing a dif-
ferent type of picture.
Main problem is to overcome
poor light. To surmount this dif-
ficulty, large aperture and slow
shutter speed are used. This pro-
duces a picture which represents
the snow as long wh*e streaks.
The second method is to use a
flash at the camera, with small
aperture, and shutter speed of
about 1/100 second. This combi-
nation gives a "Christmas card"
effect with the snow flakes show-
ing round and fluffy.
Have Equipment Ready
While snowstorms and overcast
days can provide interesting pho-
tographs, the majority of eye-'
catching photographs are made1
on days when the light is good.
Once the blizzard dies down, and
the sun begins to peep out, have
the equipment ready to start
shooting.
The best time for taking pic-
tures is in the morning or after-
noon when the light is slanting
and shadows are long.
The flat lighting of noon is not
nearly as dramatic.
Sidelighting or. backlighting
usually gives the best results. This
brings out the texture of the snow,
intensifies the glitter of the ice,
and throws interesting shadows
into or across the foreground.
Snow, Ice Transforms Objects
One of the most fascinating
characteristics of winter ph oto-
graphy is the ability of snow and
ice to transform commonplace
scenes or objects into things of
beauty. A cluttered farmyard or a
city alley may take on unknown
beauty after only a few inches of
snowfall. Icicles framed in a win-
dow, cars buried in snowdrifts
along the road, or ice-covered
branches or telephone wires are
but a few subjects near at hand.
In many pictures it may be de-
sirable to give an impression of
depth to lead the observer's eye
into the center of the picture.
Ski tracks, ruts left by passing
automobiles, and footprints

A PRACTICAL GIFPT THAT
SHE WILL APPRECIATE.!
OSINGE"R SALEU
OF USED SEWING MACHINES
Portables 29.95
Consoles 39.95
Treadles 9.95
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
EASY TERMS
y "A Trade Mark of THE SINGER MFG. CO.
STARTS TODAY AT YOUR
SINGER SEWING CENTER
Listed in your telephone book only iender SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO.
114 S. MAIN NO 2-5569-
Watch the Daily for Christmas Buys !

Rev. Stott will be assisted by a
staff of 20 men' anrO women from
professional fields, clergymen, ed-
ucators, and the Inter-Varsity
Christian Fellowship staff.
In addition to the Rackham lec-
tures, assistants will be engaged
in discussion groups in living un-
its on campus.

WINTER PHOTOGRAPHY-University's Angell Hall, snowbound b
Sect for the camera. Lighting in this picture is ext

stamped in the snow (by the pho-
tographer himself, if need be) will
help to give, this effect of depth.
In the country, curving streams or
fence-bordered lanes will provide
those much desired S-curves.
Action, Beauty Combined
Winter sports provide an out-
let for the photographer who likes
to combine action with pictorial
beauty.
Skiers speeding down a slope
with snow plumes whirling behind
them make excellent subjects.The
best angle for ski shots is across
the slope with the subject out-
lined against the sky. Shooting
across a slope rather than head on
will increase the impression of
steepness.
It is not necessary that a cam-
era have ahigh shutter speed to
stop action. An alert photograph-

er, with practice, can catch the
peak of action with a slow shut-
ter. The slight blurring due to the
slow shutter speed will-give the
impression of great speed.
Sometimes a winter scene is
more beautiful at night than any
other time.
Full Moon Casts Light
A full moon on a new fallen
snow casts a magical light that is
flattering to any subject. Street
lamps will stand out as shining
stars.
A tripod is a must for the time
exposures in night pictures. Be-
cause a light meter cannot be used
at night, several pictures at vary-
ing exposures is the safest way
to get a good picture. Exposures
of about one minute with the lens
at f/8 will usually give good re-
suIts.

ast winter, provides a good sub-
remely effective.
One must be careful not to over-
expose or the picture will look as
though it were taken in daylight.
From finding a new picture sub-
ject to mounting the final print,
winter photography is a fascin-
ating experience. There are few
days too cold or stormy to pre-
vent an eager photographer from
going outdoors and missing the
fun provided by this rich photo-
graphic field.
During the snowy months
ahead, winter means pidtures un-
limited.

.:. A, Y ,.am. Ii t. &2 ir .r P 2A .4' 1 ; ,EP"'.".J

..' ci

V

; .: * ... '' = G? .' ." "A ; " ..0 9' '°..o''v. " t si' t+ r.c ' =. ~ ' _cs ;. {_ s *z:. ' n : 4 is ^': 'ft is °. -n . ' "ri't. _'rs i. _cs " x-- wn

AA Store Windows Show
Durable Xmas. Decorations

(4;

SNOW SCENE-Photographers find snow scenes make interesting
pictures. An alert cameraman can find scenes such as this almost
anywhere.

A spray of evergreen, a tinsel
covered snowman, a silver star
and Christmas has come to cam-
pus store windows.
Christmas displays in Ann Ar-
bor seem less elaborate and more
sophisticated than those present-
ed in larger cities. The season is
indicated, rather than spelled out
with detailed pageantry.
Many factors enter into the
degree of Christmas preparations
in store windows. Among these
factors are the limits of the bud-
get, the type of clientele and of
course the merchandise to be dis-
played.
Most Christmas decorations are

durable enough to be used re-
peatedly.
Scenes must be varied from year
to year however. As one local
merchant noted, people have a
long memory when it comes to
outstanding displays.
To display their merchandise
to the best advantage merchants
usually change their window dis-
plays every week or ten days.
Local businessmen feel that
these displays have a definite and
important relationship to sales.
Street decorations provided by
the city add yet another festive
note to the holiday season.

* *1
-f
. "IeChristmas at Overbecks
iCRDS
A distinctive display of original and traditional cards, notes, letters
and invitations. For that distinctive Christmas Greeting, try Overbecks. A
GIFTS
."- BOOKS - The Ideal Gift - fiction, non-fiction, children's, junior,
travel.
& BRIEF-CASES
. CALENDARS - Fountain Pens and Pencils -Wallets
*GIFT STATIONERY
SPLAYING CARDS -Auto Bridge
' GLOBES - Atlases
- ADDRESS BOOKS -- Scrapbooks-- Photo Albums
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
r1216 So. University Aye. 9

FINEST TOYS FOR GIRLS AND BOYS
LARGE SELECTION of
NATIONALLY ADVERTISED TOYS

41
.1
l
ti
6:;:
I.
I~;
i"+r;

r. " w wi .Now u: r. r. s. s. " . r . as r

L1117

F-.

" 7q

"

".." x:."a-r".":-:%%Vrx.,vr"..:". ."r ...rv..v:...:.:...v.a..v.. .r:.... tvr..s:.. .. :::
;;t:.}U..s" ..,.Y.":?" v..+,'>"vw. v.": :"": : ...;{}":>yi: }}..,.~'i ":}: :v" v4.. :.::.f. .{. .:h 1 . f..
G~r i.d!""t+ ivF"'r."...:sc"~GMsksrn.r.i4."" YG"So:'a1 . ..:.v f:i ;?V::ev",4" .wt~~.rf~:"a cf{": ~t ;..n?..4!{r"";.'r.i':i2}t" "

...,......:1w::itii'::~.':... u !. w"« w:':ti«:..:.ti titi.'i:f«1',1u 1«

Complete line of LIONEL
& AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS

Tremendous Variety
of BEAUTIFUL DOLLS

OPEN EVERY
EVENING
Till 9:00 P.M.

WE DELIVER
KIDDIE KORNER
Main at Madison

mmw

PHONE
NO 8-7187

f4

= .1

flannelette

Swiss

sleepers

Christmas gifted-

BUNNY-FUR MOCS
only $ 99

Pit
px T

Si
1-Z f
s y r
13 ®r y .

Ski-inspired pajames as warm and bright
as the fireside after a day on the Alpine slopes!
Multicolor print on snow-white flannelette,
with rib knit neckband and cuffs,
to keep you cozy on Christmas night.
Choose windbreaker style or nightshirt
with short trunks. Sizes 12 to 18. 6.95

5''
y -
4ic
4 4
Y . e p
f:"t~3

i

Teens to Grandmas love
their soft cuddly warmth! Their silky-
feeling, sno-white bunny fur! With
soft-padded soles, flannelette lining,
colorful hand-beading. She'll
think you paid much more.

40.4
r

<N.

i

I r

a

E t I

.;"
.:.:

? ir f

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan