100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 02, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE THREE

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1956 THE MICHIGAN BIlLY

l fT\TL l litAil Jul

F,

RELIGION ON CAMPUS:
Lane Hall Unit Formed T

MANY
Aid Student!c

PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED:

By MURRAY FEIWELL
The foundation of the first
college YMCA at Michigan, Jan-
uary 1858, began a period of in-
tense interest in religion on cam-
pus.
Thus culminating 99 years of
religious activity, the University
Board of Regents has established
the Office of Religious Affairs.
Though it was formed by a
Regents by-law last May 24, the
Office is just beginning to func-
tion according to C. Grey Austin,
Assistant Coordinator.
Presently maintaing offices in
Lane Hall, the organization head-
ed by Coordinator DeWitt C. Bal-
dwin, will move to the new Stu-
dent Activities Building upon its
completion.
The office has a variety of
functions which may be taken
advantage of by University stu-
dents. For instance, each member
of the staff is available for coun-
seling.
After hearing a student's prob-
lem, the counselor will refer the
individual to a minister of his
or her denomination. But a stu-
dent need not have a religious
problem in order to consult with
a member of the staff. Austin
maintains that most of the many
and varied problems which the
the staff is confronted with can
in some way be tied to the reli-
gious field.
Problems range from those con-
cerning religion and which church
one should affiliate with if he has
not already done so, to the field
of dating or -other social problems,
such as getting along with other
people. Studies also constitute a
problem which causes many stu-;
dents to trek to Lane Hall. I
According to Austin, couples
also have sought the advice of
a staff member in relation toI
marriage. Should they wait and
finish school? Should they marryI
immediately? These are just a
few of the questions which arise.
In addition to counseling, the
Office works with various reli-
gous groups on campus. Under the
.guidance of the Office, a council
of student religous organizations
has recently been formed.
With Austin as adviser, the
council discusses various problems
concerning religion, or matters
which can be closely correlatedI
to religion.
Third function of the Office
lies in the program area. To
members of the staff, Harold K.
Duerksen, Program Director, and
Dolores M. Elden, Program As-
sistant, spend most of their time
visiting various organizations giv-
ing talks and orienting the stu-
dents on ways by which to bring
religion into their everyday life.1
The staff wishes to provide)re-
sources for the enrichment of the
ilife and work of the campusI
wherever it may be carried on.
The Office also acts as a lip-
ison with all religious agencies
and denominations in the Ann
Arbor area. There are at the pre-
sent time 24 different faiths and
denominations on the Michigan f
campus.
Interestingly, more students at
the University are involved in
religious activity through the re-
ligious centers than in any other
extra-curricular activity.
Included in plans for the fu-

ture. according to Austin, the Of- in all parts of the campus and
fice, in conjunction with the there are many different kinds
newly formed council, is planning of resources available to develop
extensively for Religious Week that interest."
which will take place sometime "It is our purpose to bring the
in March. students and the resources into
In Austin's words, "Student'in- a constructive relationship with
terest in religion can be found each other." he observed.
!OMAIN OFFICE
101-107 S. Main St.
w off 1CS * NICKELS ARCADE'
330 S. State Street
1o NEAR 'ENGINE ARCH'
1108 South University
* PACKA RD-BROCKMAN
volt 1923 Packard
! WHITMORE LAKE
9571 N. Main St.
BANKING
:r>>FOR STUDENTS
::::..::Your banking affiliations are
important to you during your uni-
versity career. For more than two
decades students have looked to
the campus branches of the Ann
Arbor Bank as their banking head-
quarters. We hope you will, too,
4.-
0 0
. ::. .
:.{"::: A N NA:: :..r.;,... .!!{;;, . U. .:f '..: . O .. .,....:::; }.:;Ct:R"; W ~ii'::i .iiv

F
.,,:'
i
}
i
;

i"*'*Itudents

Rely
i*
Par~kinlg
IMajor
Difficulty
More than 4,000 University stu-
dents rely on the bicycle as their
major mode of transportation dur-
ing the school year.
Bicycles are used to go to and
from classes and residences, to vis-
it friends, to go shopping in State
Street and Main Street sections of
Ann Arbor, for Sunday afternoon
riding dates, and for a multitude
of purposes best satisfied by use
of a bike.
University cyclists rush off to
class via bike, then search for a
parking space. In some areas, it is
impossible to find an.empty rack,
in others there are too many
racks
Bicycle parking at dormitories is
considered by some students to be
a bigger problem than automobile
parking.
Dormitory racks are filled early
in the afternoon. Students who re-
turn from late classes must leave
their bikes standing on sidewalks
or piled next to dormitory walls.
Students encounter a problem on
city sidewalks.
An Ann Arbor ordinance prohi-
bits bicycle riding and parking on
several streets in the campus area.
Students often are required to
park their bicycles in the street,
thus inviting damage.
Another problem facing cyclists
is that of licensing.
As licenses expire every April,
a student enrolled in a 4-year
course must buy five licenses for
his bicycle in order to be within
the law.
And, cyclists encounter a prob-
lem, which. is paramount during
the school year-how does one
keep his bike safe from rust?

011

Bikes

PARKED AT BENCH-Their bicycles used for transportation,
these students meet at bench on campus for an afternoon date of
reflection and thought.

PARKED IN RAIN-Five bicycles parked in rain give off reflec-
tions in puddles. Cyclists' main problem is how to keep bikes
from rusting in wet weather.

I

DAILY
PHOTO FEATURE

--------------------------------
I1
I 1
FOLLETT'S owsyouhow to
make18 people happy this IuigtMaS
1 $5.95 AV D
I IFI
1 1
I ~ ~ . ... .......
I 62 5951
$ --
I Please everybody.? CERTAINLY! Whether you have eight, II
I eighteen or eighty on your list, books will compliment them r
I -- and you. FOLLETT'S is the one place where you can find
the most appreciated gifts for everybody, from small children1
1 to large grandfathers, from smiling brides to serious business- I
I men . .. and for just as little (or as much) as you want to 1
spend. .I
rBUY AND BROWSE AT r
State St. at N. UniversityI
- - - - - - -- - - - -$- - - - -

PARKED IN THE SNOW-Winter bicycle problem is encountered by snow. This shot, taken last
winter, shows snow piled about bike wheels, inviting rust.

,L

_. .
.

9

THE JOHN STOTT LECTURES
"WHAT THINK YE
OF CHRIST?"
December 10 thru 14 . . . 8:00 P.M.
Sponsored by Michigan Christian Fellowship
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

r

$ MUSIC for CHRISTMAS
CAROL BOOKS
o*SOLO VOCAL MUSIC
Standard and unusual titles
* RECORDS
JAZZ: Ted Heath, Lionel Hampton, Dave Brubeck,
Thelonious Monk, and Miles Davis
MUSIC MINUS ONE RECORDS: For recorders, woodwinds,
brass ensemble.
CHRISTMAS RECORDS:. Handel's Messiah, choral works,

... %. :. sy,; :,n . , . , .: .., . ,;ec;... ,. . , ....:. v , 5 t .:: ...?.: ;.; ti .: .'d. :: ?SCx P.: ;: . % . ". a ,. 3c. ,
fi x. ' . . a° .'"''.':. ' ... . : :r < >. , . ". .: ?' .. .:: ..:. ::.. ,, '. ....,... . : sv. ... "'." ...., a :..r. .k. °'..:. ...._ ., .. "

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan