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November 16, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-16

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRMAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1956

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1956

0

SGC, Lab(
(Continued from Page 1)t
and I on this one, and we worked
with him until it became obvious
that all he wanted was a group to
do the LYL work which LYL could
not do (because it could not ob-.
tain a hall in which to present a
public speaker).
Catching on to the liberal side
of a hot issue has always been
a favorite move of the LYL. Of
course, most liberals prefered that
it didn't, because this taints the
liberals in the eyes of hasty-
thinking people.
Besides attempting to influence
the larger student groups, the LYL
has infiltrated and attempted to
IN

or

Youth League

Tussles Common

Streiff, City Disagree on Parking
(Continued from Page 1)

control smaller ones. LYL mem-
bers have also been, and still are,
members of student groups which
they have not made a strong at-
tempt to control.
Here are some interesting sta-
tistics on what might be termed
LjYL's tactic of "multiple mem-
bership:"
Dormont was president of the
Society for Peaceful Alternatives;
Dormont was a member of the
Board of Business Discrimination
Against University Students, a
predecessor of the Anti-Discrim-
ination Board and the Human Re-
lations Board, in the spring of
1954;

Three of the 42 members of the
campus chapter of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People last spring were
LYL members, although this was
considerably less than it had been,
for LYL had lost what control
it once had of NAACP;
Of 29 Young Progressives in the
fall of 1952-53, 14 were LYL mem-
bers and one was Ed Shaffer;
Many LYL members were also
members of the Society for Peace-
ful Alternatives and the Civil Lib-
erties Committee, both of which
LYL has claimed as "positive re-
sults of our work;"

The Michigan State Police list
the following student groups as.
those which LYL has dominated
or attempted to dominate or in-'
filtrate:
Civil Liberties Committee, So-
ciety for Peaceful Alternatives,
Arts, Sciences and 'Professions,
Students for Democratic Action,
Young Progressives, Committeed
to End Discrimination, American
Veterans Committee (taken over
by business administration stu-
dents), Michigan Youth for De-
mocracy, Karl Marx Society (tried
twice--first one taken over also
by business administration stu-
dents), Academic Freedom Com-

mittee, and the Commitee to Save
the Rosenbergs. These no longer
exist. LYL has also attempted to
infiltrate the B'Hai student group
and the Unitarian student group,
according to police.
Other methods utilized by LYL
were distributing leaflets, send-
ing lierature through the mail to
any student it thought might be
sympathetic to its causes, seeking
publicity and favorable ediorial
comment for both the local and
the nation LYL in The Daily, and
bringing Communist speakers to
campus when it could.
(Tomorrow: In the Eyes of
Others)

ually acquires property for other
reasons and uses it only tempor-
arily for parking."
Finishing touches are now being
put on a Church St. parking
structure which will house 470
cars, said Shiel.
As to the student parking prob-
lem, 'Shiel remarked that many
lots weren't being used to capac-
ity. He mentioned lots near Vic-
tor Vaughn, the hockey Coliseum,
on Fuller St., lot 37 at the Union,
and opposite gate No. 9 at the
stadium.
Looking to the future, Shiel
confessed any new lots the Uni-

versity might build "would be
near the outskirts of town be-
cause houses are just too expensive
to buy up to build parking lots
on."
City Administrator, Guy Lar-
com said, "The city recognizes 1
students have parking problems, 1
but letting them have more cars
doesn't help it any." In clarifica-
tion, he said he was refering to
the driving ban lift.
Rumor has it the City is con-
sidering a ban of on-street park- '
ing between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. I
Larcom admitted this was the
recommendation of a traffic
study group headed by Lloyd B.

Reid, traffic engineering consult-
ant, but said the motion was not
before the city council at this
time.
Reid, said Larcom, in his re-
port prepared for both the City
and the University, advised the
parties to construct off-street
parking facilities. Who should do
it? Larcom said, "It is not our
responsibility for building student
lots, but they can use our May-
nard St. structure."
"Right now, the city is widen-
ing streets to help solve the prob-
lem," said Larcom.
"We would welcome any sug-
gestions to this problem area," he
concluded.

f

Restaurants

You

Will E1joy

This

Weekend

1

We recommend that you try any of these

fine restaurants for

a wonderful meal.

Consult the Daily for GOOD EATING.

THE GOOD FOOD
. * . at . . .
THE CORNER HOUSE
has found favor .with discriminating guests
202 S. Thayer Street - North of Hill Auditorium
Phone NO 8-6056 for reservations

Old German Restaurant
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST, FINEST IN MUSIC AND
FINEST IN FOOD
TAKE OUT DINNERS
Select from our entire Menu
Open from 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.
With meals served until 8 P.M. - Closed Thursdays
Phone NO 2-0737

For Light Lunches
Fine Sandwiches or Cream Waffles
At their best
stop at
B & OW'I'
COFFEE SHOPPE
Cleanliness, Quality, and Service Always
Corner 4th and Liberty
7. A.M.-Midnight . . . Closed Sundays
FAMILY STYLE DINNERS

A.;i

CHUCK WAGON
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
2045 Packard NO 2-1661
Catering at your Home or Hall Henry Turner, Prop.

IL

6

Visit Weber's This Week-End

I

w

Delicious
STEAK, CHICKEN,
SEAFOOD
DINNERS

I.

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and
CHAMPAGNE

Chicken

S teaks

Try Our Tempting. Homemade Pastries

3715
Jackson Rd.

ebes'A

Open DON,
11 to 9:30 P.M.

For your Sunday enjoyment - PAUL TOMPKINS
of the HAMMOND from 1:30-8:30 P.M.

i

SPECIAL: LUNCHEON
11 A.M.-2 P.M.
85c-95c and up
Our chefs are ready to prepare the most delicious food
for your enjoyment.
You will be served the finest in
Cantonese and American food
TAKE-OUT ORDERS ANY TIME.
We're all for MICHIGAN at Leo Ping'sa.
We even smell the roses!
Closed Monday
* 'LEO PING
118 West Liberty
Phone NO 2-5624

* Seafood
HOMESTYLE COOKING
will complete your footbal

}

I

Chops

weekend
FARM CUPBOARD
5400 PLYMOUTH RD. - DIXBORO, MICH.

N. Main right on U.S. 12

Phone NO 8-9387

Saturday and

Sunday open 11 A.M. - 10 P.M.
Closed Monday

s q

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
0MOnUIJ 90P 9me 0OWd
takes pleasure in announcing
an addition to their menu
of fine foods

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, r
o
0

qo9 (i vAp/4 oom
SMORGASBORD

h

I

U

TOI

PN

U
U

rrr
NMERrr HOTEl
300 S. THAYER STREET
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
THE ART OF ENJOYING SMORGASBORD

L

A

PIZ

will be served doily from

- * *
4 P.M. to 1 A.M. in our new dining room
"THE DUCHESS ROOM"
Exoertlv prepared by our special izza nie maker ond haked in new

Tonight YOU are the artist - for the SMORGASBORD isa
gpnd adventure and is considered a "dassic" culinary art.
tlglp yourself first to the many kinds of fish, h.erings and
seafood. Then return for the salads, meats and cheese. Finally
select from our tasty lot delicacies.
"SMORGASBORD can be traced back to the old Viking
feast days, when distances were long; but at the end of all jour.
ayas one could find romance and gaiety at the SMORGASBORD,
the lonely man besieged with troubles and sorrow could find
solace at the aSMORGASBORD,' a young maiden in search of
love and happiness could find them at the gay "SMORGASBORD.'
And so it is with our "SMORGASBORD,' which is symbolic
af the Scandinavian seat for good living. From their farms we

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