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November 13, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-13

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MMM

TUESDAY, NOVEMER 18, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13,1956 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

uber

Takes

Dorm

Second

Place

A' Grid

Final

An

,=,

Gene from the
S.DCEFDELINES
by Dick Cram

A

Scott Captures Third Place;
Fourth Copped by Strauss

Two West Quad Contestants
Win Grid Pick Competition

ner

Half a Miracle
JELL,half the "miracle" needed to put Michigan in the Rose Bowl
has happened; now we wait and hope for another big portion
of that miracle to occur this Saturday.-.
Two weeks ago, after an especially dark hour for the Wolverines,
we said IF Michigan can win all the rest of its games, IF Iowa can
beat Minnesota, IF Ohio State can down Iowa and IF Michigan State
can defeat Minnesota, Michigan can go to the Rose Bowl.
Those were and still are big IF's. But good progress has been made
with the Wolverines winning the first two of their four remaining
contests and Iowa dealing Minnesota its first defeat of the year.
Michigan must rely on its two greatest rivals Saturday to bring
the next set of if's into reality. It will possibly be the first time in
history that the Wolverines will be cheering for Ohio State and Michi-
gan State both to win on the same dal.-This game of football creates
strange allies,
Even should the Buckeyes and Spartans knock off Iowa and Minn-
esota, respectively, and Michigan win its Saturday encounter with I
Indiana, the Wolverines will still have to beat their latest jinx team,
OSU, in the final game of the season to getthe trip to Pasadena.
At least for the present, however, Michigan's football fortunes
are looking up. The pain from the humiliating loss to Minnesota two
weeks ago is dimming as the Wolverines twice since have reasserted
their great offensive strength and
have displayed a sharpened de- >r
fense.
The Maize and Blue maintained
their record last Saturday of out-
gaining every opponent this sea
son in total net yardage Although
the emphasis was almost exclus- #
ively on rushing from the T-for-e
mation-as opposed to the usually ?F
more varied attack combining run-
ning and passing from both the T
and the single wing-the Wolver-
ines again gained more than the
highly-feared backs of the oppo-
sition.
Halfback Jim Pace was the
major offensive star against Ili-
nois. He accounted for 169 yards
from scrimmage on 15 rushes and
two pass receptions. That was al-
most half his team's total output
-378 yards. CLEM CORONA
But the most impressive factor .. new hero from reserves
all year In Michigan's greater
power on offense has been the strength of the entire backfield even
into the reserve ranks.
For most teams it would be enough to have first stringers Pace,
Terry Barr, John Herrnstein and Jim Van Pelt in charge of ground-
gaining activities. But Michigan can feel just about as confident when
quarterback Jim Maddock, halfbacks Bob Ptacek and Ed Shannon or
Mike Shatusky and fullback Jim Byers are used.
The gradual emergence of these reserves as capable replacements
for the starters has lessened the worries of Coach Bennie Oosterbaan.
That Michigan could win its last two games with Barr not at full
strength is ample testimonial that reserve backs can be used extens-
ively without dread of the results.
With the status of Barr still questionable after he reinjured his
ankle against Illinois, Shannon and Shatusky may see an extra meas-
ure of action again this week.
In the line it's the same story of new-found reserve strength.
Early in the season it appeared the Wolverines could rely on only the
first string with any assurance. The loss to Michigan State can be
partially attributed to the overwork required of the first string in
trying to hold the continual Spartan onslaught. The reserves were
considered "uncertain quantity" in such a tight situation.
Reserves Develop. ..
BUT these second- and third-stringers have developed a great deal
since then. This has allowed Oosterbaan to substitute more freely
and a fresher, more alert forward wall has been the result.
There have been many examples of the competence of the alter-
nate linemen. Just last Saturday guard Clem Corona crashed through
the stiff punting protection of the Illini to contribute a key blocked-
kick to the Wolverine cause. Ron Kramer's game-clinching field goal
was the ultimate result. Corona was a minor casualty from the game,
but worked out yesterday despite a sore back.
To mention a few other reserve standouts, Dick Heynen will al-
ways be remembered for the three important recoveries he made
earlier this year of Northwestern fumbles and end Charlie Brooks
and Gary Prahst have frequently made sensational pass catches when
subbing.for All-Americans Ron Kramer and Tom Maentz.
Michigan's victories have truly been team triumphs. And the team
will be trying to pool its efforts these next two weeks to finish out
the season on the present high note.

By CARL BERNSTEIN
In a closely fought I-M second
place residence halls final, Huber
defeated Kelsey, 1-0, in overtime
at South Ferry Field yesterday.
The game consisted of consecu-
tive series of three downs and a
punt by each team as the cold
weather proved a bigger detefrent
than the opposition.
Each squad had opportunities to
score, but muffed their chances by
I- Finals
The I-M first place playoff
football finals in all divisions
will be played tonight at Wines
Field beginning at 6 p.m.
allowing the opposition to take
over either on downs or on pass
interceptions.
Pass for Point
Finally, in overtime, Huber
House completed a long pass which
provided the winning point.
In the third place playoff finals,

Scott defeated Van Tyne, 8-7, in
another overtime game. Van Tyne
opened the scoring on a HerbI
Deromedi to Ron Reosti aerial. I
Then, in the final minutes of
the first half, Scott's John Two-
mey intercepted a pass and ran
forty yards for a tolichodwn. The
extra point knotted the score at
7-7. After a scoreless second half,
Scott advanced the ball past mid-1
field in overtime to earn the de-
ciding point.
Strauss Defeats Winchell
By contrast, the fourth place
playoff was a wide open game.
Strauss defeated Winchell, 28-13,
as Mike West passed for four TDs.
Dale Clifford was a recipient of
one pass, Bill Bennett caught two
touchdown heaves, and Robert
Stabrylla received the fourth.
The fifth place playoffs was won
by Reeves, as its team defeated
Michigan, 13-7.
Tom Lynch and Karl Gotting
scored for Reeves while William
Leonard scored for Michigan.

JOE FRANCIS FRANK WITTE
... Beaver tailback ... top Coast tackle
Beavers Look to Bowl,
After DowningStanford

It was a long, hard battle to
determine last week's Grid Picks
contest winner.
Two West Quad entrants _
Jerry L. Inman, 205 Wenley, and
Robert C. Johnson, 409 Lloyd -1
topped a field of 160 by posting
16-4 won-lost marks.
Inman has been entering the
Grid Picks contest faithfully every
week, while Johnson had entered
only once-last week.
Winners Get Tickets
This week's contest is in full
swing. If you can outguess the
other contestants, you will win two
free tickets to either the Michigan
Theater, which will feature "Show-
down at Abilene," or to the State
Theater, which will show "Back
from Eternity."
All entries must reach the
Sports Desk no later than noon on
Friday, Nov. 16.
Entries may be mailed to "Grid
Picks," Student Publications Build-
ing, 420 Maynard, or you may
deliver them to the main dgsk on
the second floor of The Daily.
For your convenience, there will
be official entry blanks at the
III

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THIS WEEK'S GAMES
Indiana at MICHIGAN
Alabama at Georgia Tech
Army at Pittsburgh
Auburn vs. Georgia
Baylor at Nebraska
Colgate at Syracuse
Duke at Wake Forest.
Illinois at Wisconsin
Maryland at South Carolina
Michigan State at Minnesota
Mississippi at Tennessee
Ohio State at Iowa
Princeton at Yale
Purdue at Northwestern
tice at Texas A&M
Southern California at Ore
SMU at Arkansas
Texas at Texas Christian
Tulane at Vanderbilt
Washington at Stanford

main desk. Just make your choices
and pop them into the Grid Picks
box.
Include M' Score
Don't forget to include your
forecast of the score of the Michi-
gan-Indiana game as this will be
the deciding factor in case of a
multiple tie.

l' REMAINS 10TH:
Tennessee TopsAP Poll

By The Associated Press
The Tennessee Volunteers are
the number one football team in
the latest Associated Press poll,
edging Oklahoma by two points in
the closest vote of the season.
Tennessee's 6-0 win over Georgia
Tech drew more voter attention
than Oklahoma's 44-0 romp over
Iowa State.
The top teams with total points
and won-lost records in paren-
thee .:
1. Tennessee (7-0) ......1,446
2. Oklahoma (7-0)......1,444
3. Michigan State (6-1) .. 993
4. Georgia Tech (6-1) ... 949

5.
6.
7.
8.
,9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Texas A&M (7-0-1) ...
Ohio State (6-1) ......
Iowa (6-1) ...........
Miami (5-0-1) ........
Syracuse (6-1)........
Michigan (5-2) .......
Oregon State (6-2) ....
Florida (6-1-1).......
Clemson (5-0-2) ......
S. California (6-1) ....
Navy (5-1-1) ........
Pittsburgh (5-2) ......
Minnesota (5-1-1) .....
G. Washington (6-1-1)
Mississippiw (6-2).......
Princeton (7-0) .......

902
720
483
433
246
240
202
178
88
78
68
58
52
47
22
20

By BRUCE BENNETT
Oregon State's Beavers, who
finished dead last in the Pacific
Coast Conference only two years
ago, today loom as good bets to
represent the West Coast in the
Rose Bowl on New Year's day.
The Beavers have a 5-1 -record,
good for a first place tie with
UCLA, with two remaining games.
Their opponents are Idaho, the
PCC's weak sister, and arch rival
Oregon.
Oregon State stepped into tre
limelight with its 20-19 win over
previously favored Stanford last'
Saturday. It was its fifth straight
conference victory. The loss was
second in the conference for Stan-
ford, as against three wins.
Stanford Must Win
The only way the Indians could
make the trip to Pasadena now.
would be to defeat Washington and

California in their last two games
and hope that Oregon State loses
twice.
UCLA and Southern California
are still both in the running for
the Conference title, but because of
illegal recruiting methods, they
have been disciplined by confer-
ence officials. Washington and
California are in a similar boat,
but they are out of the picture
because of poor records.
Beavers Picked Low
Despite the fact 'that Oregon
State finished second in the PCC
last fall, not much was expected
from them this year. In the pre-
season ratings, they were billed for
no better than sixth in the ten
team loop by most observers.
Coach Tommy Protho uses the
single wing offense and has a team
composed mostly of sophomores
and juniors. They have a host of
fleet backs that operate behind a
big, tough line, headed by a 240 lb.
All America candidate, John Witte,
at tackle.
The key to the Beaver's attack
is triple threat Joe Francis, a jun-
ior tailback. Rounding out Cie
first backfield are Earnel Darden
and Paul Lowe, sophs, and senior
Tom Berry, the fullback.

Just Received

Another Shipment
All-Wool Suiting Trousers,

Victorious Bears, Giants Now Favored
To Win DivisionChampionships in NFL

These all wool Trousers are
extra Trousers from Suits in
Worsteds - Sharkskins -
Cheviots -- Flannels -
Twists - Tweeds -
Doeskeen Gabardines...
Sizes 29 to 46... Regular
- Shorts - Longs -

-
Retail Special
$1550

By CARL RISEMAN
The Chicago Bears and the New
York Giants, seeking their first
National Football League titles
since 1946, won smashing victories
Sunday and became favorites to
take their respective division
championships.
The Bears crushed the Green
Bay Packers, 38-14, and romped
into a first place tie withthe De-
troit Lions in the Western Con-
ference.
Despite the Bears' six game win-
ning streak, they were greatly in-
debted to the Washington Red-
skins, who handed Detroit its' ini-
tial 1956 defeat, 18-17.
Giants Stop Matson
The New York Giants snapped a
first place tie with the Chicago
Cardinals by stopping the Cards'
Ollie Matson and company, 23-10,I

thereby taking over the lead in
the Eastern Conference race.
The Cleveland Browns contin-
ued to have ther troubles as they
bowed to the Baltimore Colts, 21-7.
In other games, the Los Angeles
Rams defeated the San Francisco
Forty-Niners, 30-6; and the Phil-
adelphia Eagles out-defensed the
Pittsburgh Steelers, 14-7.
Bears Work Through Air
The Bears' quarterbacks George
Blanda and Ed Brown threw
touchdown passes to ends Harlon
Hill and Bill McColl. Chicago also
intercepted five Packer passes with
J. C. Caroline turning one into
a 52 yard touchdown run.
Coach Buddy Parker's strategy
in Sunday's game will be ques-
tioned for a long time to come.
Late in the fourth quarter on
fourth down with the Lions trail-

ing 13-10, Parker had punter Yale
Lary step out of the end zone for
an intentional safety.
Baker's Kick Wins
The strategy backfired when the
Redskins took the free kick and
drove to the Lions' 20 where Sam
Baker kicked his third field goal
of the game. The field goal and
the safety provided enough points
to offset a last minute Lion score.
The powerful New York Giant
offense was led by Charley Con-
nerly who threw a touchdown pass
to Frank Gifford, and set up a
scoring dash by Alex Webster with
another pass to Gifford.

rp

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