100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1956 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rAtwz ZI+G IRT

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

RUNDAY, NO V''E;MER 11, 1958

?AGZ 11GM THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1956

Pamphlet Attacks Student Restrictions

Bridge Players Never'Do Today'

Excessive authoritarian "pater-
nalism" among college administra-
tive bodies was recently attacked
by the American Civil Liberties
Union.
In a pamphlet entitled "Aca-
demic Freedom and Civil Liberties
of Students," the organization as-
serted that educational institu-
tions should exercise control over
the scholastic life and general ac-
tivity of students only to the extent
that the institutioin is responsible
for the "welfare and guidance of
its students."
The measure of this extent was
the point of arbitration by ACLU.
Three broad principles were out-
lined to cover the problem areas of
student government, organizations,
forums and publications. These
were :
1. "Students should be offered
opportunity to participate in the
total work (planning and evalua-

tion) of the educational institu-
tion.
2. "Administrators and teachers
should distinguish between the
words and actions of a student
when he represents his institution
and when he speaks as an individ-
ual.
3. "Students should live under
a government of ,law, created,
where appropriate, by Joint ac-
tion."
ACLU recommended that stu-
dent government should be drawn
from and elected by the entire stu-
dent body and should not be sub-
ject to administrative or faculty
approval:
Primary concern of the pamph-
let appeared to be with the areas
of control over student organiza-
tions and forums.
The assertion was made that
students should be free to organ-
ize and join any associations for
"lawful purposes," and that the

"fact of affiliation with any extra-
mural association should not in it-
self bar a group from recognition
on the campus . .. whether or
not affiliated with a particular
lawful party."
The ACLU continued that stu-
dent organizations may be re-
quired to register their purposes,
by-laws and activities with a stu-
dent-faculty committee, but fail-
ure to comply with this require-
ment should not result in suspen-
sion or other disciplinary action.
The statement was made that
membership lists should not be
required by institutional authori-
ties, and that the names of any
known members should never be
disclosed to any persons having no
"direct and legitimate interest
therein."
With regard to student forum
policies and the right to invite
any speaker, however controversial,
the ACLU claimed college admin-

fDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN1

The Daily Official Bulletin is an e(-
tidal publication of the University of
Michigan for which the Michigan Daily
assumes no editorial responsibility. No-
Organization
Notices
Hillel, Supper Club, 4 p.m., Hillel.
S* 4. 4
Hilel, Publicity Comitltee Meeting,
4:30 p.m., Hillel.
* 4. *
Hillel, Tiddish Class, 10 a.m., millel.
. s s *
Wesleyan Guild, Supper and Wor-
ship Program, 5:30 p.m., Wesley Lounge.
* * s
Lutheran Student Association Meet-
ing, 7 p.m., Lutheran Student Center,
Speaker; Chuck Curtiss.
Congregational and Disciples Student
Guild, Meeting, 7 p.m., Congregational
Church; Speaker: Mr. Duerksen, "The
Christian Faces the Draft."
s . 5s4
Graduate Outing Club, ike and Sup-
per, 2 p.m., Rackham Building.
Gamma' Dela, Supper-Program, 6
p.m., Lutheran Student Center, 1511
Wsehtenaiw Discussion: "Racin and
the Church."
Unitarian Student Group, Meeting,
7 p.m., First Unitarian Church.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Meet-
ing, -4 p.m., Lane Hal, Speaker: Dr.
Van Wylen,"Becoming a Christian."
" * s
Student Religious. Association, Folk
Dancing, 1:30-10 p.m., Monday, Lane
Hall.
University of Michigan, Folk Danc-
erOrganizational Meeting, 8 p.m.,
Monday, Lane Hall.
* * *
Pi Lambda Theta, Invitational Tea,
7:30 p.m., Monday, Rackham, Speaker:
Lois Knowles.
Medieval Society, Meeting, $ p.m.,
Monday, East Lecture Hall, Rackham
Building, Speaker: Prof. Niess, "Med-
leval Themes in Modern Literature."
* * *
Chess Club, Meeting, 7:30 p.m., Tues-
day, Union.
Deutscher Verein, Meeting, Mozart
Program, 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Rooms
3 R&S, Union.
Scholarship to Free University of
Berlin-Petitions are available in the
Office of Student Affairs, 1020 Ad-
ministration Bldg. They are due -No.
vember 26.

tices should be sent in TYPEWRITTEN
form to Room 3553 Administration
Building before Z p.m. the day preced-
lng publication.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1956
VOL. LXVII, NO.44
General Notices
Anyone who has reoms to rent for
weekends, contact the Union Student
Offices.
Le-tures
University Lecture in Journalism. Don
Shoemaker, executive director of South-
ern Education Reporting Service, pub-
lishers of Southern School News, will
speak on "Progress of Desegregation"
on Mon., Nov. 12, at 3 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Ivy Baker Priest, Treasurer of the
U. S. will speak Tues., Nov. 13, 8:30
p.m. in Hill Auditorium as the fourth
number on the Lecture Course on,
"Our Monetary System." Tickets go
on sale tomorrow 10 a.m. In the Audi-
torium box office.
Economies Club, Wed., Nov. 14, 8:001
p.m., Rackham Amphitheater. Dr. Nich-
olas Kaldor, economist of Kings Col-
lege will speak on, "Conditions of
Economic Development." Staff mem-
bers and graduate students in eco-
nomics and business administrationl
urged to attend. All others invited.
Concerts
Concert. Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Ger-
man opera star and concert singer,
will give a program of songs and arias
in the third concert of the Extra
Series, Wed., Nov. 14, at 8:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium.
A limited number of tickets are avail-
able at the offices of the University
Musical Society in Burton Memorial

Tower: and will also be on sale after
7:00 on the night of the concert at
the Hill Auditorium box office.
Academic Notices
Faculty, College of Literature, science
and the Arts: Midsemester grades of
ID" and "E" are due Wed., Nov. 14. Send
freshman and sophomore reports to 1210
Angel Hall and junior and senior re-
ports to 1213 Angell Hall.
Mathematics Club. Tues., Nov. 13, at
3 p.m., in the West Conference Room,
Rackham Building. Prof. J. L. Ullman
will speak on "Problem in Harmonic
Mappings."
Doctoral Examination for William
Franklin Jewell, III, Geography; thesis;
"The Influence of Shore Processes on
Shorezone Utilization", Mon., Nov. 12,
210 Angell Hall, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
K. C. McMurry.
Doctoral Examination for Jack Gilbert
Scruggs, Pharmaceutical Chemistry;
"Derivatives of Homopiperazine", Mon.,
Nov. 12, 2525 Chemistry Building, at
2:00 p.m. Chairman, F.F. Blicke.
Coming Events
General , Meeting of the Michigan
Dames Tues., Nov. 13 at 8:00Bp.m. at
Assembly Room, Rackham Building.
Panel discussion on "What the Recent
Election Means to Me and to My
Country."
Placement Notices
The following school will be at the
Bureau of Appointments, on Nov. 13 to
interview for teachers.
Grand Rapids, Michigan-All Ele-
mentary grades; Speech Correction;
Girls Elementary Physical Education.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
439.

istrations "have responsibility for
defending this freedom against
hostile and often irresponsible
forces in the outside community."
It was furthered that "students
should enjoy all the freedoms of
association and civic participation
that other American youth pos-
sess."
In reference to the power of the
student press, it was stated that
"to avoid, by rigid and complete
control, the irritations and contro-
versy that a free college paper al-
most inevitably entails, is to in-
escapably limit the effectiveness of
an educational program intended
to promote vigorous independent
inquiry."
Concluding on the topic of stu-
dent discipline, the ACLU said that
no student should incur punish-
ment for engaging in such off-
campus activities as political cam-
paigning, picketing or participating
in public demonstrations, provid-
ing that he does not unauthorized-
ly purport to speak in the name of
the college.
Student Governments, organi-
zations and the entire student
body were defended for their right,
without penalty, to discuss and
take any lawful action on any
matter concerning or affecting
them, "in the widest construed
sense."
Round Table
Plans Institute
On Relations
The Ann Arbor Round Table of
the National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews will sponsor a one-
day Human Relations Institute,
Tuesday, Nov. 20, with the co-
operation of the University's Ex-
tension Service.
The program will begin with
registration in the Rackham build-
ing at 9:30 a.m.
Sustained by individual contri-
butions, the NCCJ is an organiza-
tion "for promoting justice, amity,
understanding and co-operation
among Protestants, Catholics and
Jews through information, educa-
tion andcommunity inter-faith
programs."
Program theme will focus on a
community self-analysis of human
relations in Ann Arbor, as revealed
bythe Community Self-Survey.
Workshops will be held at the
Rackham building.
Covering the various areas of the
Self-Survey, a list of work shops
and participants will be released at
a later date.
General chairman for the insti-
tute is Dr. Herman Jacobs, director
of the Hillel Foundation.
Further information for those
interested in the Institute may be
obtained from Lane Hall or by
calling NO 2-1214, spokesmen said.
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

4
4

J
8763
K754
KJ92

4
4
S
A10854
A1094
102
Q6

E
K73
QJ52
8
107543

4
4

N
14
34

The Bidding:
E S W
P 14 p
P 44 all pass

Most people prefer to live by the
motto 'never put off 'til tomorrow
what can be done today.' Bridge.
players, however, ofen 'never do
today what can be put off 'til
tomorrow.'
This is especially true of deci-
sions and finesses which should
often be delayed until the maxi-
mum amount of information is
known. So it is with today's hand
where south's patience is duly re-
warded.
West recognized that most of the
strength would be in the dummy,
so hoping it force an early deci-
sion, led a club. Declarer had
many problems. The trump suit
might have two losers; a diamond
finesse was required, and the club
lead might not be from the king.
Since the heart suit provided a
discard, declarer chose this as the

By EDGAR SIMONS
Daily Bridge Columnist

4
V

N
Q962
K

f AQJ96.3
4 A8

method of eliminating the club
loser. Thus he won the ace of
clubs in dummy, led the king of
hearts, and then - not having
mirrors - led a small spade to
his ace and used the ace of hearts
to discard the small club from
dummy.
The spade suit how showed ex-
actly one loser. Since a diamond
finesse had to be taken eventually,
south led the ten of diamonds,
which held.
Declarer now returned to pulling
trump. This required care, as a
hand re-entry had to be preserved
for further play ,of the diamond
suit,
Hence south led the ten of
spades and played the nine from
the dummy. If east failed to take
this, declarer could repeat the
diamond finesse and cross-ruff the
hand, losing only the king of
'U-Hour' To View
Love Problems
The problem of what kind of love
will result in a stable, happy mar-
riage is the topic of discussion on
the University TV Hour at 10 a.m.
today over WWJ-TV, Channel 4.
How to analyze one's feelings
and be sure they are not just
infatuation, love on the rebound
or other temporary emotions will
lie discussed by Prof. Robert Blood,
University sociologist, and Mrs.
Kenneth Boulding.
On the second half of the TV
Hour, the chamber music series
will focus attention on Brahms.

trump at the end. Thus east won
and forced the dummy with the
queen of hearts.
Declarer carefully trumped with
the queen, led dummy's last trump
to his eight, extracting east's last
trump, and then played one more
round of trump.
At this point everyone had four
cards. Declarer had one in each
suit; west had the king of clubs
and the king and two little dia-
monds which were enough to stop
dummy's diamond suit even after
another finesse.
But south led his last trump. If
west discarded a diamond, dum-
my's diamonds would win the last
three tricks. So west discarded his
king of clubs, hoping partner had
the queen.
But declarer played the queen
of clubs, repeated the diamond
finesse and won a total of twelve
tricks.
Thus declarer's patience was re-
warded. He gave west the honor
of holding the high club at the
start but took it away from him
at the end.

Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

SYLVIA STUDIO al
I) ANICE 0
CLASSES in
c KINDERDANCE
(Pre-School Children)
* ACADEMIC BALLET SYLVIA HAMER, L.C.C.A.
for Advanced and Phone NO 8-8066 or
Professionals NO 8-7227
o TAP 525 E Liberty
* BALLROOM Michigan Theater Bldg.
oao<t)> omcyc-->f<--f<== f<--->c.c-c_<-=>

jw

I

t +
f

MORE
DAYS*
If you wish to select
Personalized

4

4

11

S74 s1R 3 F 3G71 7 ir7 Cl llll ftl ;l i !l l F t i' 1i

CHRISTMAS CARDS
from
THE LARGEST COLLECTION OF
UNUSUAL CARDS IN ANN ARBOR
at
CHESTER ROBERTS GIFTS

*,Shopping Days

312 S. State St.

S CY: C' 1K'. C !@ ii C 'd! [ iKY i' !" ° iClP l K IC '

IL"! yS~ :5,*r.',"' .;.N t 'v.::t}.o'%'.*t "j."f",' . x 'm
p , ? r.,3.T.. ..f.;...;y;. ":>::C':hvS > .;:'',: $".;yt : '.%."+." +'^M2.h
pe, x: y,"fiyt"'y{y;{ ,., >>j:tf v>:* ..}: <. " ,: :. }}:: *:: ...v".;,. . .E ,C a sa s o
t '4~~. .rP '"F 3v.* t.;,:};:t':;};/ {'':L::: .:r r,"1.}:. Y" :;v ,'i
i " ,rr.x:''+a:i'y.:t~a?,i:;:y :k{ +?..c"+: .- 'c .r:.r'.CSkt :.Q5"

K iG~t)4o t;o000'oC:.)og0 0GmoX=
We have many itesns i-Needlepoint o
that would make beautiful Xmas gifts.
Come in and see then!
YARNCRAFT SHOP
10 Nickels Arcade NO 2-0303
ol2.>4i"ks:0 ><==>

r

.r..r

"fl

I

*w

FEINER GLASS & PAINT CO.
216 W. William Street Ann Arbor, Michigan
Telephone NO 8-8014
We Have All Kinds of Glass-Mirrors and Furniture Tops.
We Have the Nationally Advertised Paints.
You Can 'Park Right in Front of Our Store.
WE HAVE BEEN SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR 67 YEARS

*0

I.

"You'll reach the lop faster with a smaller company like Emerson Electric
where there is greater diversification and continuous planned expansion."

HILLEL
SUPPER

CLUB

SALE

I

- IRain cover was 3.39, now 2.891
Tool BogsI
(Blackor Tan) 1.98, now 1.39
Bells*...... .78, now .50 1
I Electric Horns
I with battery. . 2.19, now 1.89 f
Air pumps. . . 1.89, now 1.35 !

2 Corned Beef
Sandwiches
Dill Pickles
Cokes
Potato Chips
Fruit Salad

"Only in a smaller company like Emerson Electric
you meet management on common ground, discuss with
brass your individual problems and plans. Together
work out new ideas . .. and they're more than willing
give yours a try. And there's more diversification in y
duties.
"Furthermore, at Emerson your daily contacts inch
sales, purchasing and production departments. You hi
the opportunity to learn, first hand, all company funct
..knowledge that's invaluable when you're on thev
to the top. If that's your ambition, then Emerson has
job for you."
The ink was barely dry on Ed Johnson's M.E. deg
before he started at Emerson Electric. His has been ar
success story, and after just six years with the compan
it isn't finished by any means. Ed's first Emerson jobN
in the production department, an administrative assist
From there, he moved on to shop foreman. In Ed's own we
t',, _ lln. , ~4*+ a o n ra r nn A t on rn

Whatever your preferred field of engineering specializa-
tion, there is a gateway to career progress waiting for you
at Emerson. Commercially, since 1890, Emerson has been
,a leading producer of fans, motors, air conditioners, welders,
and power tools. The Electronics and Avionics Division a
leader nationally since 1940, designs, develops, and manu-
factures active defense systems for bombers, supersonic air
frames, mortar locators, missiles and rockets like the Honest
John.
Find out how you can get in on the ground floor of this
fast growing, medium sized company. Meet Emerson's engi-
neering representatives and talk your career over with them.
Firm job offers can be made. If it's impossible for you to
make a date, be sure to write or call A. L. Depke, Office
and Technical Placement Supervisor, for full details.
ENGINEERS ... A.E., C.E., E.E., I.E., M.E.
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS

I --- I

I

I

1t1\J...

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan