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September 17, 1956 - Image 39

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE!

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

Many Projects
Sponsored
By 2 Groups
Lane Hall, Hillel Plan
Diversified Activities
For All Men, Women
Lane Hall and the B'Nai B'Rith
Hillel Foundation are campus
headquarters for organized reli-
gious activity.
Lane Hall which houses the
University's .Student Religious As-
sociation upholds the old French
motto,. liberte, fraternite, egalite,
(freedom, brotherhood, equality)
by putting out the welcome mat
for all students.
SRA annually prepare a pro-
gram of square dances, inter-cul-
tural outings and coffee hours, in
addition to inter-faith lecture
series.
Study or Pray
Within the building are numer-
ous facilities designed to further
SRA activities. An extensive li-
brary and study hall, comfortably
furnished to permit informal
room and places for medition and
conference are available to anyone
who chooses to take advantage
of them.
The modern Hillel building func-
tions as the center for religious
and other activities of Jewish
students.
Beginning with a mixer early in
the semester, Hillel offers a full
program extending throughout the
year.
Hillelzapoppin'
Starred on the agenda is the
annual Hillelzapoppin' held each
spring during which affiliated and
independent coeds and men vie
for a trophy with a presentation
of skits and song and dance rou-
tines.
The group also sponsors a schol-
arship competition for those who
wish to pursue a career in Jewish
Community work.
Amateur theater groups offer
several plays during the year at
Hillel.

Students Improve Reading Skills

11

The Reading Improvment
School, functions on the principle
that everyone can double his read-
ing speed, regardless of intelli-
gence.
Headed by Donald P. Smith, the
School began in 1954 as one of
four branches of the Bureau of
Pschological Services, sponsored
by the Institute for Human Ad-
justment.
Smith and his graduate student
assistants have found through ex-
tensive tests that students who
have taken the course usually have
a better over-all grade average
than those who have not been ex-
posed to the reading technique.
Free Service Offered
The free, non-credit course is
given four times a year, twice each
semester for a seven week period.
Classes meet twice a week but stu-
dents are urged to practice one ad-
ditional hour.
During class hours, instructors
explain the principles of increas-
ing reading speed, and students
are , allowed to check their pro-
gress by the use of special equip-
ment. Books are placed on a ma-
chine with a shade that comes
down over the page according to

the speed set, while students must
keep ahead of the shade.
Comprehension of material is
tested afterwards.
800 Students Yearly
The Service teaches more than
800 students a year how to read
faster with better comprehension,
and how to improve study habits
and vocabulary.

Supported partly by philanthro-
pic funds and partly by the Uni-
versity, the school had rough be-
ginnings before 1952 which failed
because a large enrollment could
not be handled.
The only prerequisite for taking
the course is the student's desire
to become a better reader.

'AFCW Plans Sports Events

WELCOME TO THE CLASS OF 1960
AND FORMER STUDENTS
VISIT US FOR ALL YOUR
NEEDED ACCESSORIES
! BATES BEDSPREADS & DRAPES
" DRESSER SCARFS
* LAUNDRY BAGS
* SHOE BAGS
* SMALL THROW RUGS
r BATH TOWELS & WASH CLOTHS
* BLANKETS
* SHEETS & PILLOW CASES
"WHERE QUALITY HAS NO SUBSTITUTE"
GAGEI' LINEN SHOP

Co-ordination of the Women's
Athletic Association activities is
done by the WAA Board which is
a member of both the state and
national Athletic Federation of
College Women Organization.
Through this organization the
University is able to know what
other women's athletic organiza-
tions are doing in the country.
Published once each month,
this magazine contains news of
various WAA organizations in the
country.
Membership in the state AFCW
consists of the various colleges
and universities within the state
of Michigan.

Each year these groups have
sport days, state meetingsand
conventions at which they ex-
change their problems in an at-
tempt to solve them and obtain
new ideas about sporting activi-
ties.
The school acting as president
of the state organization rotates
each year among the different
member schools according to a
definite pattern.
Coordination between the Un-
iversity WAA Board and the na-
tional and state organizations is
done through the AFCW repre-
sentative on the WAA Board.

11 NICKELS ARCADE
Hours Daily: 9:00 to 5:30

ulky Knit Sweaters
Plaids Shown for Fall

I

cr

By ARLINE LEWIS
Amidst this fall's crop of bright,
blanket plaid skirts, bulky knit
sweaters and dyed-to-match sep-
arates, college fashion seems a
well-balanced blend of die-hard
perennials and exciting novelties
f that might well join their classic
cohorts.
Plaids, long a wardrope staple
in skirts, have been reinterpreted
into bold, massive patterns ideal
for campus wear.
Designers have put these color-
ful fabrics. into flared skirts, kept
slim at the hips to agree with the
popularity of the sheath silhouette.
Dyed-to-Match
Especially valuable to the col-
lege coed are dyed-to-match
sweaters and'skirts which can be
' worn with sport shoes to class and
with dress shoes for dating pur-
poses. A new addition to this pop-
ular group is the matching silk
shirt which can be worn under the
sweater./
Deep reds, tawny maples, jewel
y blues and earthy shades of green
' have replaced the traditional win-
ter. tones of grey and brown in dy-
ed-to-match pre-eminence.
Even soft pastel shades, former-
ly acceptable only for warm wea-
ther wear, are being featured for
fall.
Classic Sweaters
Classic cardigans and pullover
sweaters still remain coed favor-
ites but quite a spiced variety has
entered the knitwear picture.
Sweaters may be found in bulky
knits, cropped at the waist, and
others are ideally hooded for
windy football games.
Shetlands, previously available
only in men's sizes and styles and
i, found in men's stores, have been
given feminine interpretation. The
' long-sleeved crew neck, which can
be worn alone or topping shirts
will still reign as the favorite part-
ner for tweed skirts.
Bermuda Short Popularity
Aimed at dampening the popu-

I I

larity of bermuda shorts are the
modified knickers or plus fours.
These fall loosely to below the
knee where they come to a tight
stop. But like. bermuda shorts,
modified knickers will be outside
of the classroom apparel range for
University coeds.
Fabric interest this fall is struck
by luxurious fur-blend fabrics that
look and feel like cashmere but
are much less expensive.
Black and white herringbone
tweeds, in which the colors were
often indistinct, have been revit-
alized by the addition of linen to
the fabric. The linen adds a clar-
ity and lustre of color.

Big Sisters Help Freshmen
Become Acquainted with 'U'

By SANNA SCHEINFELD
A newcomer to the University
always feels lost .when she sees
all the strange faces and hears
all the new rules.
That's the reason for having
"big sisters."
The big sister plan operates in
underclass dormitories and is co-
ordinated by the Assembly As-
sociation with Lou Ann Carmichael
as big sister chairman.
A big sister's most important
job is to help integrate her fresh-
man into the house and the cam-
pus activities.
The first job of a big sister is
to write a letter to her little sis-
ter. In the letter, she tells informa-
tion such as how much money
one needs during the first week
for things like house dues, books
and food. She tells her what kind
of clothes to bring, stressing the
importance of a raincoat. She
encourages the little sister to write
any questions that she may have.

At the beginning of the semes-
ter there are big-little sister pic-
nics and parties in various dorms,
to help the sisters get acquaint-
ed.
Getting to know the other wo-
men in the house is also very
important and the big sisters see
to it that everyone meets every-
one during the first weeks.
A big sister informs and ad-
vises little sister about campus
life. She stresses the importance
of studying and study habits. She
makes sure that her freshman
is acquainted with the rules of
her dorm, the Women's Judiciary
Council and the University.
Little sister is told about cam-
pus activities such as SGC, the
meritutorial service, rushing, As-
sembly and WAA.
The big-little sister plan doesn't
end with Orientation Week, how-
ever. It is a whole year's activity,
and continues until each little
sister feels as much a part of the
University as he big sister does.

"Head-of-the-Class"
Labels
That Make Their
Home at
DIXIE SHOPS
LILLI ANN
LASSIE JR.
MAIN STREET
JAMESH IRE
R & K
JUNIOR FIRST
MARIE PHILLIPS
CAROL CRAIG
KIMBERLY
JACKFIN
MODERN JR.
SELECT
AMCO OF NORVELT
SMARTEE
MAC SHORE
SHADOWLINE
ROGERS
PETER PAN
JUNIORITE
LEATH ERMODES
BROWNIE
FAIRFIELD
BOTANY 500
ESQUIRE
PIONEER
GULFSTREAM
HANES
CHIEF

-
&Y
'00
Get acquainted
with,
Here you will find the smartest fashions for men, women-and children, too; cloth.
ing bearing famous brand labels-selected from the fashion centers of America, by
alert buyers who are well versed on what the campus crowd is wearing from coast

Ii. .f'

DRUGS - PRESCRIPTIONS - CIGARS - SUNDRIES
ANN ARBOR'S
MOST COMPLETE DRUG STORE

Intelligent and In

terested Service
receive your

I

Come in and

FREE CALENDAR
listing all University Activities
FLETCHER-MACK DRUG CO.

to coast.
And, here's where your budget comes in-our price tags are "tailored to fit it"-mod-
est in every sense of the word. What's more, we'll "tailor" convenient budget terms
to fit your neds, too. We offer you five convenient ways in which to arrange your
payments-30 day charge; 60 day, 90 'day or 6 months budget accounts-or cash.
You name the terms you want and we'll arrange them on your signature only.
For many years "Michigan" men and women ,have made the Dixie Shops "their
store."They, have discovered, by so doing, that it was simple to be among the best
dressed on campus yet to live within their budget.

11

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