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September 17, 1956 - Image 38

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-17

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Fudents Practice Varied Methods of Study:
niversity Offers- Many Library Services

LEARN TO FOX TROT, WALTZ, RUMBA:
Michigan League Presents Dance Classes

Instructors

A.;'

By ROSE PERLBERG
udy Hints
freshman usually enters col-
with the dual aim of learning
having a good time.
otentially open to him are bids
he honor societies, whose pre-
iisites almost always include
alarship.
rhether a student becomes a
nber of the honoraries or not,
i still important that he form
i study habits and the sooner,
better.
here is no one guaranteed suc-
ful method for tackling the
ks. Studying, like many other
igs, is often an individual mat-
Usually, by the time a student
hes the college level,"he has
sed the best system for him-
The only thing left-is to fol-
it!
Inexperienced
ut there are sometimes those
ase secondary education did not
ude so much practice in out-
preparation. This student of-
faces college exams and study-
at a complete loss, with the
ing that to learn five or six
lects thoroughly for a mid-
a or final examination, is an
ossible task.
ven the old hand at the study
ine strays from his schedule,
oite the best of intentions in
beginning.
hi Eta Sigma, freshman honor
ety, has prepared a pamphlet
he so-called tried and tested
and don't's of study habits
i the aim of bringing more
olars into their ranks.
[ost important, they say, is to
dget your time." Make a sched-
and stick to it," Even the stu-

dent who has trouble following a
set pattern in the beginning will
find that as time goes on, and he
becomes accustomed to it, he will
wish he had done it long before.
Prepare for Exams Early
1 Phi Eta Sigma also stresses ear-
ly preparation for examinations.
One "should begin early in the se-
mester ... with a thorough weekly
review for each course."
As simple as this rule sounds,
failure to follow it too often proves
many a students undoing. It's so
easy to say "Oh well, I'll go over
that next week."
But the weeks roll by and before
he knows it the student finds him-
self faced with the prospect of
cramming eight or ten weeks work
into his head within a matter of
less than a week, as he contem-
plates his final exam schedule.
Good Preparation
It's no secret, too, that the stu-
dent who is best prepared will get
the most out of his courses. In-
structors don't give assignments
simply as a diabolic way of filling
up the students' spare time-
homework is part and parcel of
the learning process.
The student who is far-sighted
enough to form good study hab-
its at the beginning of his college
career can benefit from these hab-
its. A freshman has a lot of learn-.
ing to do-but if he learns how to
study, he will have accomplished
a great deal.
Places To Study ..
Freshmen will soon find that the
University may be generous in
providing assignments to fill up
theirs spare time, but it is equally
thoughtful in alloting them inter-

(Give

Lessons

To 3 Groups
By SUE RAUNHEIM
On t h e University campus,
dancing is one of the most prom-
inent social activities.
The Michigan League offers a
program of dance classes through-
out the year.
Instruction is given at all levels
and everybody can find a class to
suit his own particular need,
whether he be a beginner or an ad-
vanced dancer. The beginning
classes give the student a solid
foundation in the fundamental
steps such as fox trot, waltz,
rhumba and tango.
Intermediate classes are offered
to coeds and men who know the
fundamental steps but want to
learn the more advanced techni-
ques. In the advanced dance class,
techniques and style are the cen-
ter of attention. Students must be
excellent dancers to get into the
exhibition class. Any student in-
terested in this class must tryout.
All classes are free to coeds.
Any woman interested in learning
new steps and meeting new friends
can act as a hostess at the singles
classes or may come to one of the
doubles classes with a partner.
A small fee is charged to men at
the beginning of the series.
Classes this fall will again be
under the direction of John Ur-
banic, former dance instructor in
a Detroit studio. He will teach stu-
dents mambo steps, the dance
which is currently popular on all
college campuses.
An added attraction last year
was the date bureau which func-
tioned in connection with the
doubles classes. Those interested
in receiving blind dates signed up
for this service at the beginning of
classes.
Students interested in joining
fall dance classes may sign up at,
the league undergraduate office.

'-4

ONE WAY TO STUDY!!!

esting and modern places in which
to prepare lessons.
The aspiring student can cram
knowledge into his head in any-
thing from small, homey lounges
to large reference libraries.
For the student who does his
best work in a room where there
are many other fellow laborers,
the general library, .business ad-
ministration library and other di-
visional libraries and study halls
are available.
51

These rooms also give access to
sources for specialized fields. Ref-
erence books, periodicals and mag-
azines are at the student's finger-
tips. Libraries in individual college
buildings provide him with infor-
mation in such fields as education,
natural resources, fine arts, music
and engineering.
Those who prefer to "crack the
books" in a more informal atmos-
phere, may find that the comfort-
able chairs, couches and tables
in the Henderson Room of the
League, or Lane Hall. Library, fit
their needs.
Open to women only is the
League Library, which allows co-
eds to reach the ultimate in study
stocking feet.
For breaks between study, the
League Round-up Room is a popu-
lar place. Students can get to-
gether for a chat and smoke over
a soft drink, sandwich or malted,
or engage in one of the perennial
games of bridge that are carried
on by enthusiasts almost around
the clock. Television entertain-
ment is also provided.
Union Facilities

LEAGUE DANCE CLASSES--Each year instructors are provided by the League for students who
wish to learn new dance steps or to improve their old dancing skills. Classes are offered to be-
ginner, intermediate and advanced. groups of men and women. A small fee is charged to men stu-t
dents at the beginning of each elass series.
All Independent Womlen Become
Members of AssemblyAsociation

v,.

By BEATA JORGENSON
Assembly Association, the or-
ganization for all independent wo-
men on campus, plays an intergral
part in the lives of coeds.
All incoming freshmen, trans-
fers and other women who are not
affiliated, automatically become
members of the association which
coordinates independent women's
activities on campus and sponsors

many projects and 'social func-
tions.
Through the Assembly Execu-
tive Board and the League House
and Assembly Dormitory Councils,
Assembly serves as a sounding
board for independent women.
It is the official representative
on campus for its women and co-
ordinates their activities within
the residence halls.
Through its many functions, As-

INDIA ART SHOP

IMPORTERS

330 MAYNARD STREET

Upperclass Coeds Have choice. of Living
In Dormitories, 'U' Owned Co-operatives

BY SANNA SCHEINFELD

W PERSIAN PRINTS
- BED SPREADS
W DRAPES

t/ WALL HANGINGS

I-' JEWELRY

lo GIFTS

1 JAPANESE PRINTS

The Union has put aside two
study halls for men and/or their
dates. Rooms are equipped with
chairs and tables expressly forf
that purpose. Soft drink machinesE
are located nearby in the hall.
Students who don't like to stirf
into the night air for their study-
ing will find that almost every
dormitory has its own lounge orx
study hall.
There are even a few students
who prefer the solitude of theirf
own rooms (providing the room-
mate has utilized one of the many
outside facilites) for studying pur-
poses.

Incoming women have a choice
of two types of housing--dormi-
tories or University-owned co-op-
eratives.
In their freshman year all co-
eds must live in a dormitory. Af-
ter the first year, they may live
In a League house, a sorority
house or an Inter-cooperative
Council co-op, besides the dorm.
There are 19 of University hous-
es to choose from, ranging in size
from 100 to 400 residents.
Helen Newberry and Betsy Bar-
bour are the smallest dorms, each
having 100 women residents. They

are located next to one another
on State Street, opposite Angell
Hall.
Stockwell Largest
The largest women's dorm on
campus is Stockwell Hall which
houses 400 girls, located on the,
corner of Observatory and North
University. Next to it, in the mid-
dle of the block is Mosher-Jordan
Hall, two seperate dorms, housing
250 women each.
Just beyond Mosher-Jordan is
Alice Lloyd Hall which has four
houses-Angell, Hinsdale, Klein-
stueck and Palmer. Each of these
holds 150 women.

'11

YOUR REGISTRATION Is Incomplete
Until You've Opened Your Student's
CHARGE fCCOUNT
No Red Tape ...Just Show Your I.D. Card

These fourdormitories are us-
ually referred to as "the Hill."'
Farther up the street, near the
hospital, is Couzens Hall. This res-
idence generally houses nursing
students, but due to the housing
shortage, coeds enrolled in other
schools are living there too, now.
Prescott and Tyler Houses in
East Quadrangle and Victor
Vaughn on Catherine Street are
also dormitories for University co-
eds.
Martha Cook, next to the Law
Quadrangle on South University,
is for upperclass women only. It
houses 150 women and is an "hon-
orary" dorm in that women must
reach and keep high scholastic
average and must participate in
campus activities to live there.
Cook is for unaffiliated women.
Co-op Houses
Fletcher Hall has rooms and
kitchen facilities for upperclass
women. No meals are served there.
There are three Inter-coopera-
tive Council co-ops-Geddes, Hen-
derson and Adelia Cheever. A co-
op is a more inexpensive type of
housing since each woman works
a certain number of hours each
week for the benefit of the house.
The League houses are . smaller
living units. They are supervised
residences, varying in size from
10 to 30 uppdrelass women. Some
serve meals once or twice a day
and some do not serve any meals.

sembly offers coeds valuable, op-
portunities for meeting people by
working with other League spon-
sored groups as well as other cam-
pus organizations.
Officers of the Assembly Board
include: Jean Scruggs, president;
Betsy Alexander, first vice-presi-
dent; Gloria Sweda, second vice-
presidents Mary Ann Forbes, sec-
retary-treasurer.
The Assembly Dormitory Coun-
cil is composed of house presidents
and the ADC representatives. ADC
policies and functions in a legis-
lative capacity for the Assembly
Association. This body is the direct
contact that each dorm has with
the others and with the Assembly
Executive Board.
The League Houser Council. Is
made up of the League House and
co-operative p r e s i d e n t s. This
council discusses the acts upon
matters directly concerning coeds
who live in these types of housing.
Among the projects included on
the Assembly calendar of events is
I-Hop to be held on Saturday, Oct.
13. This girl-bid dance is to be the
first big all-campus dance of the
year. -
Independent women will be
needed to work on committees
such as decorations, publicity,
tickets, programs and patrons.
Aiother project for the year, to
be sponsored jointly with the In-
ter-House Council, is the IHC
Assembly Spring Show which is
scheduled to be held on Feb. 17.
Friendly rivalry between resi-
dents of the women's houses char-
acterizes the annual Fortnlte.
Each dormitory presents a skit
based on a central theme and a
trophy is awarded to the most or-
iginal presentation.
On this same evening, scholar-
ship is recognized. The house with
the highest scholastic average is
awarded a scholarship cup to keep
on display for the following year.
Some of the other projects of
Assembly's agenda include plan-
ning a new residene hall, coordin-
ating an effective big sister pro-
gram and presenting an officers'
training program early in the fall.

f
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