100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1956

T- MCHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8,1956 THE M.ICUIGAN DAILY PAGE THRE2

_ _

. ;

Phi

Gams,

SAF,

Capture

Fraternity

Semifinals

Tau Delts Subdue ZBT,
Gain Second Place Final

BARR STILL LIMPING:
Grid Practice Stresses Pass Defense

By DAVE LYON
Phi Gamma Delta's "A" touch
football team qualified for the
I-M social fraternity championship
game by surprising Lambda Chi
Alpha, 15-14, in a see-saw semi-
final match at Wines Field last
night.
At the same time, Sigma Alpha
Epsilon bested Delta Tau Delta,
18-7, in the other first-place play-
off game.
The Phi Gams seized an early
2-0 lead when Tom Anderle trap-
ped LCA tailback Fred LeMire in
his own end zone for a safety.
Jack Wheeler then passed to Clint
Wagner for a touchdown and to
Gene Honeyman for the extra
point to up the margin to 9-0.
Just before the half, however,
LCA's Jerry Dangl threw a long
touchdown pass to Bob Clark andE
then scored the point to close
the gap at 9-7.

-Daily-Ed Graff
SHORT GAIN - Phi Gam Don Young leads interference
for teammate Fred Lyons in last night's I-M football thriller.
The Phi Gams topped Lambda Chi Alpha, 15-14, to gain the
final round of the 'A' social fraternity playoffs.

Shortly after the intermissiof,
LeMire passed to Dick Good for
another TD, then scored the extra
point to provide LCA with a 14-9
lead.
With just a few minutes left,
Anderle went all the way with
Wheeler's long heave, providing
the Phi Gams with the necessary
points to win.
Tony Hoffman passed to Bill
Mesdagh twice for scores as SAE!
romped to victory.
Tau Delta Phi made two early
touchdowns stand up for a 13-6
win over Zeta Beta Tau in second-
place "A" playoff contest.
Jack Roth hurled two touch-
down passes to lead Pi Lambda
Phi to a spirited 12-6 win over
Kappa Sigma in a fraternity "B"
first-place semifinal.
In fourth-place "A" playoffs,
Beta Theta Pi edged Zeta Psi, 12-6,
and Chi Phi eliminated Alpha Sig-
ma Phi, 13-6.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon scored a
6-0 second-place "B" playoff vic-
tory over Phi Kappa Sigma; Phi
Sigma Kappa ousted Delta Tau
Delta from "B" third-place play-
offs, 7-0; and Phi Gamma Delta
forfeited to Phi Kappa Tau in a
scheduled fourth-place game.
Miscellaneous residence halls
scores were Taylor 6, Michigan 0;
and Kelsey "B" 18, Williams "B"
13 in overtime.
Correction: -Phi Delta Theta de-
feated Tau Kappa Epsilon, not Phi
Kappa Tau, as reported in yester-
day's Daily.
I-M VOLLEYBALL SCORES
Actuaries 5, Disks 1

Cold weather couldn't cool off
the fired-up Wolverine team which '
effortlessly ran through yester-
day's practice session.
The drills, which found the
players yelling and clapping their
hands, centered mainly on setting
up a defense which would be able
to stop the Illini.
Stress Defense
A good share of the time was
spent on pass defense which was
surprising, since Illinois is con-
sidered mainly a running team.
The scrimmaging, which lasted

only ten minutes, found the first
and second stringers constantly
breaking through the scrubs and
into the open.
Barr Late
Terry Barr was late coming out
to practice and was limping no-
ticeably. Oosterbaan decided not
to have him work out yesterday
and used Shannon at right half
on the first team, while Mike Sha-
tusky worked out with the second
squad.
Apparently the light drill and

ED SHANNON
. . .first team

.V4.'44.V444."V.'aV44..4444".'...5s.4 '44.55.......~. a' ~ '4

pi'q ie... MIKE ROTUNNO

By DALE CANTOR
Observed at an interview with
Mike Rotunno:
..A personable young man
with a ready smile . . . A varsity
football player whose new-found
glory is well-hidden by the unpre-
tentlousness of a senior.
. ..A 20-yr. old center who is
looking forward to a professional
football career . . . A native of
Canton, 0., majoring in Social
Studies.
You may connect some of these
observations with the Mike Ro-
tunno who was a second string end
last year, but this year's Rotun-
no - a first string center - is
somebody new.
Initial Change
The initial change took place
last spring when Rotunno made
the shift from the No, two left end
spot to the center slot. It wasn't
the first change of position for
him - he was switched from full-
back to end after he reported for
the varsity at the beginning of his
college grid career.
He's been nothing short of bril-
liant at the center slot all season.
Always a strong defensive player,
Rotunno makes a lot of sharp
blocks after he centers the ball.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan said,
"Rotunno has contributed im-
mensely to our game."
Several weeks ago, a headline
appeared - "Rotunno Happy at
Center on Michigan Grid Squad."
Happy? You bet he is! He's play-
ing a lot, and he's met the chal-
lenge of playing at a new position
and playing it well.

Let's take a closer look at the
center position and judge for our-
selves the difficulty of adapting
to it.
It is no child's play to hold a
football out at arm's-length on
the ground in front of you and
roll it back so that it passes be-
tween your feet, and still preserve

short scrimmage were utilized in
the hope that the Wolverines
would not pick up any more inju-
ries before Saturday's big game
with Illinois, who have won the
last five out of six contests against
Michigan.
Marciniak Out
Sophomore guard, Jerry Marcin-
iak was the only gridder who was
not suited for the practice. He is
still resting from a chest injury
and it is very doubtful if he will
play this weekend.

brawn will be overthrown, and
that is patience. The center will
be called upon to face all kinds of
petty annoyances, for his oppo-
nents will endeavor to make hisj
play as difficult as possible.
In addition to this, every man
who breaks through gives him a
rub. Sometimes these knocks are
intentional, often they are given
purely by accident, and the latter
are by no means the lightest.
Faces Harassments
These are just a few of the
harassments Rotunno faces. In or-
der to make the grade, he had
to master these techniques, plus
many others. His efforts have
been somewhat realized - his
teammates laud his "linebacking
ability" and his "tremendous
adaptation."
Rotunno is one of the most fer-
vent Michigan partisans of the
day. He cannot be described as a
"good loser", except in the super-
ficial sense of the word. He can
keep calm, of course, but his spir-
it hates defeat, and he plays sys-
tematically and with all his wits
for victory.
It is preposterous to think that
he does not feel unhappy when
Michigan loses, or that he does
not make up his mind that a de-
feat must not occur for the samea
reason again.

AP Chooses
UCLA Back
By The Associated Press
Don Shinnick, 20-yr.-old senior
quarterback at UCLA, was chosen
Associated Press back of the week
yesterday for his great play both
offensively and defensively against
Stanford last Saturday.
Shinnick, a 6', 200-pounder, was
in virtually every play as UCLA
upset Stanford, 14-13. He was the
leader in the rush-and-ruination
of Stanford's John Brodie, and his
blocking made possible many
gains for his ball carriers.
Shinnick's one conversion was
the victory margin. He blocked the
second Stanford conversion at-
tempt which, if successful, would
have meant a tie.
John Herrnstein of Michigan
gained voting support for his sec-
ond half play that brought the
Wolverines a 17-14 victory over
Iowa.
The sophomore fullback gained
66 yards in 18 rushes, mostly in
Michigan's two long drives for
touchdowns in the third and
fourth periods.

.r
;L,. Clei
.4, .'Ci
?r.: ..
JL: t.::

.i'W 44 a. 4r,. ' i 4.'4;- .::' ? . 1 .5S 4. .."> '.>44r44v4444444 f. .,tf. .v. . . .¢+r;{ . f"+ ' s5>5...4 C' d.'".s544 ''.
. :4"'. . > . .:.>...:+......ti..a ": {."44. '."...*4 .i**444 ' 1'4 {". ... ..v; ' . ' > ,.. '...'.54.. +'4+. .' ;
.{t. .1 .4..:: :...".::.. P:.MP.....". ..... . .. . S........}>4.«..........>.. ..1..\........4.>. .sA L '1.:'" .t"...VY h .> .. ...t ii J'd{. ?: v'?\ i}1"

STORM BOOTS'
(Ladies')
Warm, Comfortable Footwear fbr the cold days ahead.

Seldom Seen Kids 6, N
Hawaiians
Turks 6, Newman Club
CMS Jrs. 6, AFROTC
Ukranians 4, Evans Scholars
Pill Pushers 4, Owen Co-op
Phi Epsilon Pi 6,
Alpha Delta Phi

0
0
0
2
2
0
0

Two colors to select from-Natural
and Charcoal Grey..... .$13.95

This boot comes in Black - Grey
- Navy - Brown & Red .. $9.95
Sizes to 10, AA-B.

Latvians 6,

Wesleyans

SALE
20% DISCOUNT
on all ZIPPER BINDERS
For a limited time only
MORRILL'S
314 S. State Phone NO 3-2482

VAN BOVEN SHOES, Inc.
... 17 NICKELS ARCADE

MIKE ROTUNNO
. . . New-Found Glory
a good balance in spite of a sud-
den push of a 200-lb. opponent.
The man who is selected to fill
the center position must be a
man of sense and strength. Brain.
and brawn are at their highest
premium here. On defense, Rotun-
no assumes the role of quarter-
back - he calls the signals.
There is another element of
character without which brain and

A4:°4;4...'.44,.a.........r.......nn..,...........1..........n......".... ,.... ........ ..,..,..... . :. iV.1 L,

..44 . ..55... " '4.V.- r.5' ..V4".S' k?:ti 444...... ..}:? ... kX::4. . . . . . ...r..n."or "
'444.V44.44.............................. J. r4444.4444455 ..~44*r ~ 6
in .::.r......."i.:r.r " r:":.."..;: ..}a.........n.......555'. 4 .'4.".:... 4 ..:?:L ........ :v:a .r. .v..:r..:"...t:h. 4 ..V

--- ---

MORE
DAYS*
If you wish to select
Personalized
CHRISTMAS CARDS
from
THE LARGEST COLLECTION OF
UNUSUAL CARDS IN ANN ARBOR
at
CHESTER ROBERTS GIFTS
Shopping Days 312 S. State St.

PROB M aTo evaluate the all-round career
advantages offered by the widely diversified
activities at Divisions of North American Aviation, Inc.
Fl RST STEP: GET THE FACTS in man-to-man

A Campus-to-Career Case History
I r
1 !
1 !
# j
1

interviews, on campus NO1
As a graduate In
Engineering, Phys.
ics, Applied Math. or:
allied subjects you
need complete, fac-
tual information to ji 'ii. =
help you make a
sound decision In
choosingyourcareer.
Get the facts in a AUTONETICs
man-to-man interview with our representative.
Let him tell you about our unique placement
and training devised to help your potential
develop rapidly in a company where continued
expansion has doubled the number of employ-
ees in 5 years. Your possibilities are wide and.
varied, as you will see from these brief notes
on the 4 Divisions:
AUTONETICS creates automatic controls and
electro-mechanical systems of a highly inter-
esting nature. Work includes research, design,
development, manufacture and testing; you
will become a part of the latest advances in
inertial navigation
and guidance, fire
and flight controls,
analog and digital
computers.
ROCKETDYNE is
building power for
ROCKETOYNE outer space-large,
liquid propellant rocket engines. The Field Test

,VEMBER 7, 8
of his specialty In one week than in a year of
"conventional" practice.
ATOMICS INTERNATIONAL is pioneering in the
creative use of the atom. If you are able to
meet the high requirements for this work, you
can help introduce a new industrial era.
Atomics International is designing and building
varied types of nuclear reactors, for both power
and research, with the practical experience
gained by 10 years in the field.
MISSILE DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
Long range missiles, including the interconti-
nental SM-64 Navaho, present problems of the
.'imost fascinating
nature. Speeds,
. materials and
functions now be-
ing dealt with were
only theoretical a
- few years ago. The
work is vital; the
opportunities for
ATOMICS INTERNATIONAL you, as a creative
engineer, are correspondingly great.

i
i
i
i
i
t
i
a
1
I
I
1
I
1
1
I
{
I
I
I
I
1
I
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
I
1
i
I
A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

1
1
1
1
r
r
s
6
I
I
1
1
1
1
1
N
1
r
M
1
1
1

Don Gundersen (right) discussing characteristics of a transmitting horn on a radio relay tower.
Young man on a mountain

JUMBO BURGER
10:00 A. M. to 11:30 P.M.

If Don Gundersen isn't in his office, he's

the chances of transmission interfer-
"l A - A 1-- - - - -

_I

N

CONTACT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE TODAY
Make an appointment NOW to see North
American Repre-
sentative on cam-
pus. OR WRITE::
Mr. J. Kimbark, f
College Relations
Representative,

probably on a California mountaintop ence?" And those are only a few.
making tests and surveys prior to the "The answers have to be right, too,"
raising of a radio relay tower. says Don. "The recommendations we
That's part of Don's job as an engineer make control hundreds of thousands of
I with Pacific Telephone and Telegraph dollars' worth of construction. There's I
Company. With other young engineers no way in the world of 'burying' a mistake.
he makes field studies, then analyzes the "But I like responsibility, and the
data and decides where to locate equip- chance to make real contributions. The
ment for mobile radio, radio relay and telephone business is growing so fast, and
point-to-point radio links.. ..
p -p technological improvements are coming
He has to answer a lot of questions, along in such volume, that opportunities
such as "How high must the towers be? to get ahead are excellent. If the business
How much will access roads cost? What looks remarkable today, think what it'll

II .'C#A:. II

i

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan