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November 02, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-02

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FRIDAY, NOVEmB 2,1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMEE

DISPUTES 'JUNGLE' MYTH:!
Prof. Crary Tells of African Trip.

Educators, A rchitects
Discuss Future Plans

9 5
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By JAMES BOW
From C a p e t o w n to Cairo,
through "Darkest Africa," is a
journey which may bring to mind
dark steaming jungles, hostile
tribes, charging herds of wild
beasts, and strange tropical fe-
vers.
Prof. Douglas D. Crary of the
geography department an'd his
family made this journey last
year, bringing back impressions
and experiences which seem to
contradict this picture of the
"Dark Continent."
Prof. Crary disproved this Hol-
lywood concept of Africa by driv-
ing through the continent on
roads which he compared to Am-
erican highways of thirty-five or
forty years ago.
The Crarys traveled in a truck,
converted with extra windows
and airplane seats to a heavy-
duty station wagon.

They stopped at numerous ho-
tels, inns, and rest houses, located
from the Union of South Africa to
Egypt.
After disposing of the truck in
East Africa, they traveled by
plane, rail, and boat and spent
a month journeying down the Nile
by river-boat and launch, switch-
ing to automobile and train tray
el ten times in order to avoid the
Nile's rapids.
Safaris Sell Danger
Prof. Crary commented on the
dangers of commercial African sa-
faris, which, he added, "sell the
narrow escape to wealthy tour-
ists."
He described' only one narrow
escape when a rhinoceros charged
the car, stuck in the mud, in
which his wife and daughter were
trapped.
"The rhino missed by two feet,

but could have turned the car
over."
Prof. Crary's description of Af-
rica, in his own -words, "breaks
down the Stanley-Livingstone
concept which is still popular"
and provides a glimpse of the
present-day continent and her
peoples.
Africans Not Primitive
In ten months and 20,000 miles
of travel, Prof. Crary was able to
observe the native Africans in
many nations, were not "hostile
tribes," but some even self-gov-
erning as in the Sudan.
The Union of South Africa, he
described, was a "beautiful but
unhappy land," with millions of
natives living on inadequate reser-
vations.
Johannesburg he called a "busy,
glittering city," yet with queues of
natives four abreast and three

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

blocks long waiting for buses to
take them to their "locations."
Belgian Attitude Different
Different from the Afrikkaners,
or Dutch descendants who hold
the political majority in South
Africa, the Belgians have anoth-
er attitude in ruling their native
population in the Congo.
Although Europeans are out-
numbered 100 to 1 in the Belgian
Congo, Prof. Crary commented
that there is no racial problem.
The Belgians maintain a colony,
he added, and are not afraid of
colonialism.
At the same time, they are
training natives in various techni-
cal skils, although not giving
them positions of much responsi-
bliity.
Prof. Crary added that the Bel-
gians realize the natives will even-
tually gain influence in the Con-
go, and they are now marking
time.
Visit Pygmies
In the Congo, the Crarys drove
through the Ituri Forest, the land
of the primitive pygmy tribes,
and, in contrast to their surround-
ings, stayed in a small inn "with
excellent French cuisine."
In Uganda, northeast of the
Congo, the Crarys left their car
and crossed Lake Victoria by bush
plane.
This land, although a British
protectorate, is a native state with
a king living in the capital city
of Kampala.
Golf Course in Uganda
Prof. Crary added color to hisI
descrpition of Uganda by telling
of its European capital, Entebbe,
and its spacious, well-trimmed
lawns and excellent golf course
bordering on Lake Victoria in
the heart of "Darkest Africa."
When questioned about the
land of their destination, Prof.
Crary described Nasser's rule in
Egypt as a "temporary thing,"
and cited a genuine desire among
Egyptians to become a "respected
member in the family of nations."

"Planning Together for Better
School Buildings" was the topic
discussed by 350 Michigan educa-
tors and architects at a Univer-
sity conference yesterday.
Importance of studying the past
history of school buildings to un-
derstand the future was stressed
by main speaker Samuel Brownell,
Detroit superintendent of schools.
"When we look at what will be
25 years ahead, I think it would
be well to look at what we were
doing 25 years ago," Brownell said.
There has been much progress
in the school buildings built in
the past 25 years, he mentioned.
"But I think that we need to re-
member that tomorrow's children
will have the same characteristics
as those of today.
"Much of what goes on in edu-
cation," he said, "will be similar
to today's education and this flex-
ibility (in building) we have been
talking about as so desirable will
be a flexibility in which we util-
ize the new knowledge which we
gain and adapt it to changing
conditions."
"For the most part," Brownell
continued, "we will have to put
the same elements into education
which were used by our grand-

take place within the present
framework in order not to "feel
in danger of ruining the next
generation."
"I don't think it is a question,"
Brownell concluded, "of a tailor-
made school for a particular com-
munity or a mass-produced school.,
"We have made progress in cars
not by having eacn car different
from any other car. It's the com-
bined efforts of many people that
have helped to bring many im-
provements within the range of
all of us."
Doctor Sees
One Vaccinie
For Babies
Babies may receive immunization
with' one innoculation 'against
polio, diptheria, tetanus and
whooping cough within a few
years, according to Dr. James L.
Wilson, chairman of the University
department of pediatrics and com-
municable diseases.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an of-
ficial publication of the University of
Michigan for which the Michigan Daily
assumes no editorial responsibility. No-
tices should be sent in TYPEWRITTEN
form to Room 3553 Administration
Building before 2 p.m. the day preced-
ing publication.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1956
VOL. LXVII, NO. 36
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Nov 16, Com-
munications forbconsideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Nov. 7.
Washington Heights Parking Lot, Ef-
fective Mon., Nov. 5 the parking lot
east of the Public Health Buildingnbe-
tween Washington Heights and Uni-
versity Terrace will be closed to park-
ing because of construction activities.
A limited amount of parking is avail-
able for users of this lot on- Fuller
Street.
Anyone who has rooms to rent for
weekends, contact the Union Student
Offices.
All veterans who expect education
and training allowance under Public
Law 550 (Korean G.I. Bill) must turn
instructors' signature form in to Dean's
office by 5:00 p.m. Fri.. Nov. 2.
National Science Foundation fellow-
ships in science for the 1957-58 aca-
demic year will be awarded in the
mathematical, physical, medical, bio-
logical, engineering, and other sciences
including anthropology, psychology,
geography, certain interdisciplinary
fields, and fields of convergence be-
tween the natural and social sciences.
Awards are available to any citizen of
the United States who has demon-
strated ability and special aptitude for
advanced training in the sciences. First
year fellowships are available to col-
lege seniors who apply now and will
hold the award for the first year of
their graduate study. Applications must
be received by the Foundation by Jan.
7, 1956. Preliminary application cards,
and further information may be ob-
tained in the Office of the Graduate
School, or by writing to the Fellow-
ship Office, National Research Council,
2101 Constitution Ave., N. W., Wash-
ington 25, D. C.

National Research Council, 2101 Consti-
tution Ave., N. W., Washington 25,
D. C. Applications must be received by
the Council by Jan. 11, 1957.
Student Government Council, Sum-
mary of action taken at the meeting
of Oct. 31, 1956.
Approved: Minutes of previous meeting
Calendaring: Pep Rally, Nov. 9.
Apothecary Ball, Feb. 22
Odonto Ball, March 16 - one o'clock
closing hour
Spring Campus Elections-March 19,
20
Appointments to SGC Internal Struc-
Un ture Study Committee: Jean
Scruggs, Rod Comstock, Tom Sawyer,
Joe Collins, Professor Laing,
Activity: Nov. 16 Monte Carlo Ball, 9-1
Union.
Heard: Human Relations Board report
Received: Outline of areas of concern
to National and Internatiornal Com-
mittee.
Adopted motions as follows:
Military Counseling: That the Edu-
cation and Social Welfare Commit-
tee investigate the adequacy of the
University Military Counseling Pro-
gram in fulfilling the needs of stu-.
dents. Results of this study are to
be presented to the Council at the
meeting of December 12.
Residence Halls: That Campus Af-
fairs Committee gather pertinent in-
formation concerning all phases of
financing of 'Residence Halls at the
University of Michigan. The final
report on results of this study are
to be brought to the Council for*
consideration not later than the first
meeting in January. Areas to be
covered: (1) present self-liquidating
plan of financing -- the program
and its effectiveness (2) present sys-
tem in comparison to comparable sys.
tems at other schools (3) present sys-
tem and its relation to rising en-
rollment (4) other plans of financing.
To send the following cable to ap-
propriate student organizations in
Poland and Hungary.
"Student Government Council of the
University of Michigan endorses the
universal principles 'of academic free-
dom and University autonomy, sup-
ports your efforts . to attain these
goals, and sends best wishes for suc-
cess. SGC stands ready to offer as-
sistance within its means should you
so request."
Student' Forum: Public Relations
Committee is to bring in a pro-
posed plan for a Student Forum.

lic is respectfully requested to come
early enough to be seated on time,
Academic Notices
Admission Test for Graduate Study
in Business: Candidates taking the Ad-
mission Test for Graduate Study in
Business on Nov. 3 are requested to
report to Room 140 Business Adminis-
tration Building at 8:45 a.m. Sat,
Physical Education -- women stu-
dents. Registration for physical edu-
cation classes for the indoor season,
Nov. 2 from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in
'Barbour Gymnasium. Please enter
through the basement door.
Partial Differential Equation Seminar
at 4:00 p.m., Fri., Nov. 2 in Room 246,
West Engineering Building. Prof. R. K.
Ritt will speak on "Week Solutions of
the Navier-Stokes" Equation."
Astronomical Colloquium. Fri., Nov.
2, 4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Prof.
Wayne E. Hazen of the Physics Depart-
ment will speak on "Cosmic Rays."
Psychology Colloquium. "Implicit
Chaining in Verbal Generalization." Dr.
Jarvis Bastian, Psychology Department.
4:15 p.m., Fri., Nov. 2, Aud. B, Angell
Hall.

parents. We will have to have He believes that manufacturers
places in the school in which
teachers and children can work will perfect a quadruple vaccine
toin which all four vaccines will be
together, and we will needt combined in the manufacturing
bring in the community more than c ed in ahe val u
Process into a single vial.
eore Three-month-old babies are now
Brownell also stated educators receiving two shots at the Univer-
should realize that changes must Medical Center's Well-baby
Clinic: a polio vaccine and a triple
re 1 vaccine against diptheria, tetanus,
Frencch Pta usut and whooping cough, Dr. Wilson
noted.
T erformWilddth
time, the polio vaccine included in
this "quadruple shot" would prob-
A program of works by Schu- ably be made adequate for oom-
mann will be played by Robert plete protection against polio,
Casadesus in a concert at 8:30 eliminating the need for additional
p.m., Nov. 5. shots now required for full im-
The French pianist will play munity,
Eighth Novelette, Carnaval, Wald-
scenen and Etudes Svmphoniaues

You feel so new and fresh and
good-all over-when you pause
for Coca-Cola. It's sparkling with
quick refreshment ... and it's so
pure and wholesome-naturally
friendly to your figure. Let it do
things-good things-for you.

ROTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
ANN ARBOR COCA COLA BOTTLING CO.

"Coke" is a registered trade-mark.

01956, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

Read Daily Classifieds

I

Tickets for the Choral Union
Concert may be obtained at Uni-
versity Musical Society offices at
Burton Tower.

11

Events Today
Coffee Hour today at the Lane
Library, 4:15 to 5:30 p.m.

Hall

music snorS

211 S. State
NO 8-4013

Coming Events
Joint Meeting of Fourth Annual In-
stitute for General Shop Teachers and
Fourth- Annual Institute for Teachers
of Woodwork, Nov. '3. Headquarters:
Rackham Building, 8:30 a.m.

t,
s[
.x
i

--DOWNTOWN-
205 E. Liberty
NO R-0675

"Dance at the Union"
Ml'EMBERSHIP DANC1E
Tomorrow Night, at 8:30
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
Music bv: TICKETS:
JIM SERVIS $1.50 per Couple

L

HERE ARE YOUR OLD GOLD
PUZZLES

]

WIN A
WORLD
TOUR
FOR TWO
Rearrange
the letters
in each
puzzle
to form
the name
of an
American
College or
University

PUZZLE NO. 13N
N
PT
CLUE: This Baptist college for women
was chartered and opened in 1833. In
1937 Maude Adams became a professor
in its famed drama department.
ANSWER
Na te
Address
City State
College
Hold until you have completed all 24 puzzles

I

PUZZLE NO. 14
. NN
CLUE: Woodrow Wilson was the thirteenth
president of this university for men.
Opened in 1747, it was the fourth colo-
nial college.
ANSWER
Name
Address
City State.
College
Hold until you have completed all 24 puzzles
PUZZLE NO. 15
CLUE: Named for a' British earl, this
college for men was founded by Eleazar
Wheelock in 1769 by royal charter from
George III. A famed winter sports carnival
is held here.
ANSWER
Name

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