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October 28, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-28

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, IM

THE MICHIGA IN DAILY

PAGE T

SU?~DAY, OCTOBER 28,1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE T1TflV~

i caa~u .a a~ 'aw

0

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT:
Sweeney Promotes 'U' Development

Competitive Bidding Key To

Success;

Part

Score

Hands Equally Important

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Remember
Ruddigore!

By GERALD DeMAAGD
John W. Sweeney is technically
the editorial assistant of the Uni-
versity Development Council, but
his job includes more than prepar-
ing promotional material.
It is the aim of the Development
Council to solicit grants to the
University from private industry
and alumni. A part of Sweeney's
job is to re-write requests to busi-
ness that come from various de-
partments of the University. In
addition he acts as a trouble shoot-
er for Alan W. McCarthy, Director
of Development Council.
Program Investigated
"The purpose of the 3rd Annual
Development Council Conference
held two weeks ago was to investi-
gate just how successful our pro-
motion has been," Sweeney said.
Present in Ann Arbor for the
conference were Development
Council board members, Alumni
Fund representatives, field repre-
sentatives, and loyal alumni who
are working with the University.
One-eighth Contribute
"We haven't been as successful
as we hoped to have been," Sween-
ey said. Only 8,738 alumni, about
one-eighth of the estimated 100,-
000 University alumni are -con-
tributing to the Alumni Fund he
pointed out. The Conference speci-
fically considered the actvities of
the Development Council program
for the past year, the third year
since the establishment of the
program. "In no case has the
program been a failure," Sweeney
said.
.Student Committee
The Student Relations Com-
mittee of the Development Council
tries to foster interest while the
student is still in school Sweeney
pointed out. The committee head-
ed by Daily managing editor Dick
Baroque Trio
The Baroque Trio will give a
concert at 8:30 p.m. tonight in
Aud. A Angell Hall.
Included in the program will
be the works of Heinichen, Loca-
telli, Francois Couperin, Tomaso
Albinioni and Bach.

By EDGAR SIMONS
Daily Bridge Columnist

situations becomes a key to success
in duplicate.
South Bid

4
4
W
31092
J98
A65
A105

M
4
.
S
iC
2C
P

N
K73
K76532
K102
2
4
4
S '
54
AQ
J98
KQ9863
Bidding
'N
1H
2H

4
4
The
w
P
"9

E
AQ86
104
Q743
J74
P
P

1

South bid and rebid clubs on his
minimal opening hand. In spite
of a six card suit north could not
generate much enthusiasm, hold-
ing a singleton in partner's suit.
The burden for imaginativeness
fell to west. When south opened
one club, west had neither the
suit nor the strength to make a
bid. But when it came his turn
to close the auction he* began to
think.
Why were north and south quit-
ting so soon? Both could have bid
spades or no trump, but neither
had. One west's conclusion was
that partner had strength and
spades. So now, although too weak
to bid his first or second turn,
he bid two spades.
This hand is, of course, from a
duplicate game. No rubber bridge
player would risk a possible large
set to compete against a part
score. His reward? Nine tricks.
After the normal club lead, west
drew trump and eventually lost
only two hearts, a diamond, and a
club.
North Plays
At most of the remaining tables
north was permitted to play the
hand at two hearts, and very few
found the defense which defeats
the contract.

Most easts led a diamond which
was won by the ace with a diamond
return won by north's king. De-
clarer could not draw trump yet,
lest he risk losing three spade
tricks. Thus he led a club, to
establish discards.
This west wins and leads a
spade. East wins as north covers
and takes the queen of diamonds
and a second high spade. The de-
fense has now won two spades, two
diamonds, and one club. A third
spade lead ruffs the dummy pro-
moting a trump trick for west.

I

-Daily-Charles Curtis
JOHN W. SWEENEY-The recently hired University. Development
Council editorial assistant edits requests to private business for
grants to the University. .

The hands which attract the
most attention are the so-called
swing hands; those in which one
misstep can cost a partnership a
thousand or more points. These, of
course, are dramatic and of prime
importance in rubber bridge where
one such hand can make the day a
success.
In duplicate bridge the part
score hand becomes as important
as the game or slam hand. This
is because each hand makes the
same contribution to success or
failure in a tournament. Thus
competitive bidding in part score

7.I

U
you
be
S

-.
s'z
F1
'll love Sandra, the sweater withlittle
girl bib topped with the sophistication
If a turtle neck. Of 100% pure
imported cashmere ...coordinated
autifully with its own Dalton skirt.
weater sizes 36 to 40 32.95
Skirt sizes 8 to 18 19.95

Snyder, '57, and composed of in-
terested students has yet to meet
this year.
"It takes time to develop alumni
awareness," Sweeney said. "Har-
vard and Yale graduates expect
to support their private 'schools
but it is hard to do this at a state
supported institution."
People think the state will pay
for everything, he said, but there
are many things that we make
possible such as faculty grants,
fellowships, and out-of-state stu-
dent scholarships which the legis-
lature does not pay for.
Sweeney came to the University
PRESSMAN'S
ASS ISTANT
Semi-skilled job. Four hours each
night, 11:30 p.m. until 3:30 a.m.
$1.75 hr. Michigan Daily. Phone
NO 2-324 1, Ext. 30. Mr. Chatters.

;.1

this fall from Detroit, where he
had been active in advertising
circles for about five years previ-
ous.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

--

Offiices

t~

to
serve

/

" MAIN OFFICE
101-107 S. Main St.
" NICKELS ARCADE
330 S. State Street
" NEAR 'ENGINE ARCH'
1108 South University
" PACKARD-BROCKMAN
1923 Packard
" WHITMORE LAKE
9571 N. Main St.

Hans Neupert
HARPSICHORDS
imported fromt Nurenberg, Germany

}
:

you

,.. .
rr-

- - i

Gilbert and Sullivan's
RUDDIGORE
Nov. 8-9-10
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
Tickets on sale Monday, Oct. 29
at the Ad Bilding

i
S
f
}
-
i
? .
i
E
t

EM

SPINET SIBERMAN

4V2 Octoves, C to F
8', Lute Stop, Length
3'6" Width 2'4"
and recorded music

All Dalton Sweaters and Skirts
ore durobly mthprooh f
Just show your I.D. and charge it at
FOR TOWN AND COLLEGE
302 South State Street 4

The finest in printed4

II

UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE, INC.
340 MAYNARD STREET NO 8-7515

.

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..:. ....

11

George Lincoln asks:

Pace's Mr. Budda

What do
metallurgists
do in a
chemical
company?

introduces a new concept
in campus magazines .. .
INCLUDED IN THE NOVEMBER ISSUE:
* A short story by the 1955 Hopwood major
fiction winner, George Lea.

'S..

..

* Life at the Union, Snack Bar:
analysis.

a satirical

GEORGE M. LINCOLN, JR., expects to receive his B.S. in met,
allurgical engineering from Lehigh University in 1957. George was
vice president of his junior. class, is active in sports, and a partici-
pant in many other campus activities. He's starting his employ-
ment investigations early, for he feels that the selection of an
employer is one of the most important decisions in a man's career.
Charlie Smith answers:
They have an almost endless variety of interesting
problems to face, George. As a student of metallurgy,
you know that about two-thirds of all known chemical
elements are metals. Many of them are revealing valu-
able new applications, when highly purified on a com.
mercial scale. Du Pont is greatly interested in several
metallic and semi-metallic elements.
My own experience at Du Pont ranges from work
on titanium pigments, to metallic titanium production,
and to the ultra-pure silicon used in transistors. You
can appreciate some of our metallurgical problems when
I point out that impurities in transistor silicon have to
be below one part in 100 million. That's equivalent to
one nound of imnurities distributed through a train of

* A special cartoon by Charles Addams.
* An open forum on University expansion,
by Prof. Clark Hopkins and Robert Birn-
baum.
* A review of Prof. Allan Seager's newest nov-
el, Hilda Manning.
* Life at the University of Vienna.
* An introduction to music's Twelve Tone
Technique.
* The Lively Arts: A drama and entertain-
ment column by Pace's own David Epstein
and Leslie Dietz.

n ^ ^ y -j

CHARLES t. SMITH, JR., received his B.S. Ch.E.
from V.P.I. in 1943, served in the Navy as an
engineer officer, and joined Du Pont's Engineer-
ing Department in 1946. Since then, he has ad-
vanced steadily through a number of interesting
assignments at various Du Pont plants., He was
recently promoted to manager of the Technical
Section of Du Pont's Pigments Department.

"it's almost light"

Metallurgists and Metallurgical Engineers

* Mr. Budda's Fashion Clinic: the latest styles
int"Bohemian Dress."I

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