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October 27, 1956 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-27

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4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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rAUZ IFIVE

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Big

Ten

To

Plan Drastic Changes of Athletic Code

Seven-Man Committee
Starts Work on Monday

4fi

Evans Scholars Gain First Place Playoff Berth

CHICAGO (IP-A special Big Ten
committee will meet Monday and
Tuesday to draft legislation which
would drastically change the Con-
ference athletic code.
The seven-man steering group
will put into specific form an al-
FOOTBALL SCORES
COLLEGE
Kansas 21, Oklahoma A&M 13
Mary 14
G. Washington 16, Wm. &
Mary, 14
HIGH SCHOOL
Ann Arbor 20, Ypsilanti 6
ready-announced plan for recruit-
ing and subsidization reforms
which stemmed from a 'soul-
searching" report on Big Ten
practices.
Athletic Director H. 0. Crisler
stated last night that the special
committee will "attempt to re-
solve into language the proposals
that have been offered."
The committee will then pre-
pare a report which will be sub-
mitted to Big Ten Conference of-
ficials at the Dec. 5-8 meetings
for approval.
1. Grant aid to athletics on the
basis of established need.
2. Determine need on thorough
investigation by "Scholarship Ser-
vices," an agency which has re-
search facilities at Princeton, N.J.
3. Enable all members of the
Conference to offer the same aid
to athletes.

On Oct. 15, Commissioner K. L.
"Tug" Wilson released a critical
Big Ten self-appraisal report in
which the Conference conceded
that the work-aid program for ath-
letes, as now conducted in the Big
Ten, was "an invitation to hypoc-
risy and deceit."
The committee meeting Monday
and Tuesday includes Verne Free-
man of Purdue, chairman; George
Young and Ivy Williamson of Wis-
consin; Crisler, Bob Ray of Iowa;
Wilson and Asst. Commissioner
Bill Reed.

By PETE MARUDAS
By defeating a stubborn Double
A's squad, 6-0, yesterday at South
Ferry Field, the Evans Scholars
clinched a spot in independent
football first place playoffs.
Both teams, previously unbeaten
in league competition, not only
battled each other but windy and
rainy- weather also. Not scoring
until the last 30 seconds of the
game, the Scholars drove time
after time into enemy territory,
only to be stopped short by the
highly aroused Double A's.
Return Kickoff to 50
After running the opening kick-
off to midfield, Evans Scholars
marched all the way down to the
opposition's 10-yd. line, mainly on
passes from Bill Haney to Matt
Shadeck. The Double A's, however,
held and took over on downs.

Then " both teams exchanged
punts until two minutes were left
in the half, when he Double A's
punted to the Scholar 24-yd. line.
After one incomplete pass, tail-
back Tony Drabik tossed behind
the line of scrimmage to Bob
Schewchuk, who in turn passed to
Shadeck in the end zone.
However the touchdown was
nullified by an illegal precedure
penalty called on the Evans Schol-
ars.
The second half was dominated
by hard, rough play as penalties
were handed out liberally to both
squads.
Midway in the half the Scholars
penetrated to the Double A eight-
yd. line, only to be foiled by an
alert pass interception on the part
of Pete Forsythe.
I . I

Following a stalled Double A
march, Evans took over at mid-
field, and with a minute left in
the game they started to move.
Tony Drabik, Scholar tailback,
then hit on five straight passes,
carrying the Scholars to the
Double A two-yd. line.
On the first play from scrim-
mage, Drabik flipped a short pass
to Shadeck, standing alone for the
touchdown.
In the only other complete game
of the day, CMS Juniors downed
Newman Club, 1-0, in an overtime
game. Playing well into darkness,
both teams were handicapped by
the loss of light.

Several times, each team started
sustained drives only to stall out
because of bad footing and adverse
conditions. Finally, in overtime,
Bob Hall, CMS passer, flipped a
soft pass to Al Carlin for the game-
winning yardage.
In another game, Bacteriology
edged Michigan Co-op, 6-0. Un-
dermanned Michigan Co-op, play-
ing three men to six, kicked off to
Jack Dewaard, who, while running,
lateraled to Roger Visser, who
tallied the touchdown. The game
was then discontinued because of
the evident uneveness of man-
power.

I-D Required
Of Students
The A t h l e t i c Administration
wishes to remind all students that
they are required to enter through
the student gates for the Minne-
sota football game today, and to
have their I-D cards together with
their tickets.
This policy of requiring I-D
cards will be followed for the re-
mainder of the football season.
In the case of spouse tickets,
the blue athletic card will be re-
quired.

power. quired.

JON ARNETT
. sparks Trojans

Notre Dame-Oklahoma Tilt
Tops Today's College Action

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ome hurch
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By BRUCE BENNETT
The eyes of the college football
world will turn toward South
Bend, Ind., today and by the time
dusk falls over the Notre Dame
campus, many things may be
known as to the relative strengths
of Oklahoma and Michigan State.
The Sooners and the Spartans
are running neck and neck for the
mythical honor of the nation's top
team and its not very often that

WILLIE SMITH
... from Jones Street

..' p-WILLIE SMITH

By PAUL BORMAN
Presently, the best known Smith
in the nation is Joe; but there is
a young man named Willie who
is the most talked-about Smith in
this area.
Willie Smith is earning his glory
on the gridiron every Satuday,
and although he is only a'sopho-
more, he has played in every game
this season.
He hails from Dunbar High
in Little Rock, Ark., the same
school which produced Jim Pace.
Willie played both guard and
tackle on his high school grid
squad and was named to the all-
state football team as a guard.
When he played on the Michi-
gan freshman team last fall, Wally
tackle position. This switch has
Weber decided to switch him to the
apparently payed off, silice Willie
is one of the brightest sophomore
prospects on the Varsity.
Although he is 6'2" tall and
weighs 236 lbs., he is extremely fast
and agile. His quick-thinking and
sure tackling make opponents

think twice beforb running his
tackle slot.
Kicking off is another chore
Which he handles well. Willie in-
jured his ankle in a pileup in the
UCLA game and has been having
relapses; but so far it has not kept
him out of any games.
The scout who sent the "gold-
dust twins," Pace and Smith to
the Wolverines was Little Rock1
High school director Earl Quigley.
It was because of Quigley's urging,
decision that Willie is playing at
Michigan's reputation and Pace's
the Stadium.
Two Younger Brothers
The Smith family, which lives on
Jones Street down Arkansas way,
numbers four. Willie, at 19, is the
second in line. He has two younger
brothers, seven and 11, who have
chosen the diamond over the grid-
iron and are playing Little League
baseball.
Future scholastic plans for the
sophomore Varsity tackle include
transfering from his present edu-
cation curriculm to pre-dental

studies, in LS&A, and eventually
going to dental school.
Plans for his athletic future in-
clude going out for the track team
next spring and participating in
the shot put and discus throw.
Such is the life of Willie Smith,
whose fame has by-passed Joe's:
at least in this area bf the U.S.
Navy Releases
ailing Podres
PORTSMOUTH, Va. (P)-John-
ny Podres, the pitching hero of the
1955 World Series when the Brook-
lyn Dodgers won their only world
championship, was released from
the U.S. Navy yesterday because
of a back ailment.
The 24-yr.-old miner's son from
Witherbee, N.Y., was released fol-
lowing a finding by a three-man
board of medical survey for a
back injury that existed prior to
his entering the naval service.

two such teams meet a common
opponent one week after another.
Everything Bud Wilkinson's Ok-
lahoma team does today, every
gain and every mistake they make,
will be compared with what Mich-
igan State did last Saturday in
crushing the Irish, 48-14.
The Sooners have been charged
by many with, of all things, gain-
ing national prominence by play-
ing a weak schedule. They'll be out
to show everyone interested that
they can contend with the best of
them, although Notre Dame can,
by no stretch of the imagination,
be considered among the best this
year.
USC, Stanford Clash
Elsewhere, the six top teams in
the Pacific Coast Conference will
tangle in three highly important
games. The undefeated Trojans
of Southern Cal will entertain
Stanford in a game that should
produce some real fireworks.
It will pit the nations top pass-
ing attack, triggered by Stanford's
John Brodie, against an almost
equally good running game of the
Trojans, led by Jon Arnett, who
will be playing in his last collegiate
game.
Oregon State Meets UCLA
Oregon State hopes to keep its
Rose Bowl hopes alive when it
meets UCLA at Corvallis, Ore. In
the other top game, California
journeys to Seattle to play Wash-
ington.
Two games that could go a long
way in deciding the Southwest
Conference race will be the Texas
A&M-Baylor and Texas-Rice con-
tests. The Aggies, conquerer of
TCU last Saturday are undefeated
in the conference, but so is Bay-
lor and the Bears, idle last week-
end, have had an extra week to
ready themselves for this game.

CD
FLEURETTE
$995
Out of'
the Famous
Red Shoe Box
Comes America's

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NORTH SIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
1123 Broadway, NO 2-6317
Dwight H. Anderson, Pastor
9:45 A.M. Church School.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Mr. C. H. Loucks and'Mr. D. Day, Ministers.
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone,
9:45 A.M. The Bible Class will continue its study
ofethe Old Testament with The Book of Deu-
teronomy.
11:00 A.M. The Worship Service is "The Protes-
tant Principle." Sermon by Dr. Loucks.
6:45 P.M. Dr. Dewitt C. Baldwin, recently back
from Russia will present, "A Christian View of
Our Relations With Russia"
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH

Best Fashion
Shoe Value

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1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M. Unitarian Church School.
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group-Mr. Jerome Sny-
der, School of Business Administration, will
continue discussion of "Economics in an Elec-
tion Year."
11 A.M. Services of Worship. Sermon by Rev. Ed-
ward H. Redman on "Knowledge Versus Pow-
er."
1 1 A.M. Junior High LRY Group.
7 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Morris Jano-
witz, Democratic candidate for Representative
to the State Legislature from Washtenaw
County's first legislative district, and Owen J.
Cleary, former secretary of state, will debate
national issues in the 1956 election.
Transportation available promptly at 6:45
from the Michigan Union, Lane Hall, and
Stockwell Hall.

07--VIII

U

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TUNE UP GAS UP & SAVE 'UP

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday, 11:00 to 12:30: Buffet Luncheon for
Alumni
Saturday, 4:15: Open House after the game.
Sunday at 9:30 and 10:45: Reformation Sunday
Worship Services, with sermon by the pastor,
"Contending Earnestly for the Faith." (Holy
Communion in the 9:30 service)
Sundaybat 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper, followed by 6:45 program fea-
turing a discussion of the receptiongaccorded
the "Martin Luther" movie.
Wednesday at 4:00 P.M.: Free showing of the 90-
minute "Martin Luther" movie, a Louis de
Rochemont production.
per Service, with sermon by the Rev. Armin
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Reformation Day Ves-
Born, pastor of Holy Cross Lutheran Church,
Detroit.
Friday at 7:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta Party.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon: "With
Banners Unfurled."
9:45 A.M. Church School.
The Congregational and Disciples Student Guild
7:00 p.m., Congregational Church. Speaker:
Mr. E. S. DeVine: "Why I as a Christian will
vote the Republican Ticket"
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
10:15 AM. Student Guild Coffee Hour
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. "An Unending Re-
formation" Sermon by Mr. Zillgitt.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School, Junior Church and Nursery at
10:45 A.M
Reformation Sunday Service at 10:45 A.M. Ser-
mon by Dr. Parr on "Here I Stand."
From 3:30 to 5:30 P.M. the annual Open House
and Tea will be held in Pilgrim Hall.
Student Guild at 7:00 P.M. County Attorney E. S.
DeVine will speak on "Why I as a Christian
will vote the Republican Ticket."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga,. Minister
Wi. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY: 3 Morning Worship Services
9:00, 10:30 and 12:00 Noon
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "Christianity and Politics"
11:30 A.M. Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Forum, "The Word
Made Flesh"
Monday and Thursday, 4-6 P.M. Coffee Break,
Pat Pickett's apartment, 217 South Observa-
tory.
Tuesday, UCF Lecture, "Christian Ethics and-
American Foreign Policy" topic, "Christian
Ethics and National Security." Ernest Lefever
of John Hopkins University. 4:15 P.M. Aud. A
Wednesday, 4:15 P.M Quiet Hour
Thursday, 4:15 PM Bible Study, "The Chosen
Peoples," League
Saturday, Nov 3: Work Day - Dodge House in
Detroit. Meet at 7:30 A. M. at church.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10:15 Meetings for Worship. Also from
10:45 to 11:45.
10:45-11:45 Sunday School.

".

at these Friendly Service Staions

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Free Pick-Up & Delivery
Packard Hill Gulf Service
600 Packard at Hill - NO 5-5300

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LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
9:00 A.M. Worship Service
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
11:00 A.M. Worship Service
6:00 PM. Supper
7:00 P.M. Program: "Fruits of the Reforma-
tion," Student-Led Panel.
Wednesday-7:20 A.M. Matins
Thursday-9:30 P.M. Vespers
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 12
noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M. Newman Club Rooms in the Father Rich-
ard Center.

q

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1220 So. University - No 8-9168
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ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon fol-
lowed by a student breakfast at the Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
4:30 P.M. Graduate Canterbury
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper
7:00 P.M. The speaker will be Right Reverend
Archie H Crowley, Suffragan Bishop of Michi-
gan.
SAINT CLARE OF ASSISSI MISSION
EPISCOPAL
2305 Packard Road
Reverend Phillip L. Schenk
Phone: NO 2-4663
10:00 A.M. Sunday Services.
10:00 A.M. Church School.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
..a WVC1 av CrrMWNATIAM

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GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School
11 :00 A.M. Morning Worship Service
6:00 Student Guild
7:00 Evening Service
Wdas. 7 .30l M KA o-- u

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