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October 25, 1956 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-25

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TIM AY, OCTOBER 29,1951

'll'- MICHIGAN DAIRY

PAGE TIME19

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

DETECTS RADIO WAVES:
New Telescope
Aids Research

Present Quad Employee
Participated in 3 Wars

"I have spent my younger life
fighting the Communists," said
Nikola Gubin, Russian-born Aus-
trian DP now working at South
Quad, "and now I want to spend
the rest of my life just living."
From Warsaw to Ann Arbor in
three wars and half a lifetime
could best sum up the past of this
snowy haired gentleman - former
cellist, bandleader and soldier.
A compact man of exceedingly
good humor, in spite of a lifetime
of battle, Gubin now works as a
maintenance man in South Quad.
Born in Warsaw in 1897, Gubin
was only seventeen when he went
into the Russian army against the
troops of Kaiser Wilhelm.
Joined 'White Russians'
Nineteen seventeen saw the sec-
ond Russian revolution and the
ascendency of Lenin and Trotsky;
and in the Red-White civil war
that followed Gubin joined the
"White Russians."
In two years of fighting, he was
wounded twice, once in each ankle
and spent a month in a hospital
at Sevastopal.
In his slightly halting English,
Gubin said, "When the White Rus-
sians were beaten, I had to go

RADIO TELESCOPE-Workmen and cranes install reflector and
receiver of radio telescope being built near Portage Lake.

By JAMES BOW
Radio waves instead of light
waves will be the subject of re-
search of the University's new
radio-telescope, still under con-
struction.
The new observatory, located
near Portage Lake, is being built
under contract between the United
States Office of Naval Research
and the University.
There are about a dozen tele-
scopes of this type in the United
States, and about two dozen more
located throughout the world.
Some of the discoveries made
through the use of this particular
kind of telescope include the spiral
form of our galaxy, a finding
which was first clearly shown oy
radio methods.
Also, in the recent studies of
Mars when the body passed rela-,
tively close to earth, a radio-tele-
scope detected radio waves emitted
by the planet.
Cooperating on Project
Both the astronomy and electri-
cal engineering departments are
cooperating on the project, which
is a development of a new field of
science only ten years old. ,
Prof. Leo Goldberg, chairman of
the astronomy department, and
Prof. Stephen S. Atwood, chair-
man of the electrical engineering
department, are supervising the
project.
The principle research to be
carried on by the University's tele-
scope will deal with the sun, and
its bursts of radio waves, and
their connection with other astron-
omical observations.
The observatory, when com-
pleted, will feature a 28 foot tele-
scope, good to 10,000 megacycles;
in other words, the telescope, while
relatively small, will have con-
siderable accuracy. *
According to Prof. Fred T. Had-
dock of the astronomy and electri-
cal engineering department, the
University hopes, in the next year.
to build a radio-telescope over
twice as large yet with the same
precision.
Complete Building
The building for the observatory
is expected to be completed in
about a month, with the electronic
equipment installed this winter,

and the telescope will be tilted
to conform with the axis of the
earth.
Since the radio-telescope is a
joint project, both Prof. Goldberg
and Prof. Atwood are working on
the project, along with Prof. Had-
dock and Nat Winsnes, a full-time
research associate.
The field of radio-astronomy
was originated by Karl Jansky, an
employee of the Bell Telephone Co.
in New Jersey.
Since then, discoveries in the
field have included new types of,
celestial bodies, shock waves in
the solar atmosphere, radio energy
waves from the planets, moon,
and the sun, and spiral galaxies in
collision.
Although the radio-observatory
as yet has no official name, it is
known by its location-10280 N.
Territorial Rd.; Dexter, Michigan.
U' Students
To Visit Albion
Albion college has invited Uni-
versity students to hear Sir Goef-
frey Keynes discuss "Blake's Illum-
inated Books," on Thursday, Nov.
1.
According to Vernon Bobbitt,
chairman of Albion's art depart-
ment, this lecture will be presented
only three time on this continent.
Sir Goeffrey, brother of the
famous economist, Sir Maynard
Keynes, has gained considerable
recognition as a surgeon, bibliog-
rapher and art critic.
One of Britain's foremost sur-
geons, he has made important dis-
coveries concerning facial paraly-
sis.
Also president of Britain's Bib-
liographical Society, he has com-
come than twelve literary and
piled more, than 'twelve literary
and medical bibliographies.
Recognized as the chief bibliog-
rapher of William Blake, Sir Goef-
frey is acknowledged the world
authority on the life and work of
the mystical British poet and
artist.
The definitive edition of Blake's
engravings is his most'recent work.

more. I just like to listen to it."
An enthusiastic fan of opera, he
knows most major operas "like a
book."
When the Second World War
erupted, Gubin once again took
up arms against his old enemy, the
Communists. Under General Ros-
soff, he spent four years in guerilla
warfare against the forces of Mar-
shall Tito.
At the end of the war, he fled to
Austria and for six years, spent
his days as a clerk and his nights
directing a street band. In 1951.
he came to the U.S. as a Displaced
Person and settled in Ann Arbor.
Working in the Quad and living
with his American wife, Gubin
says that now he is "just living,
for the first time, just living."
'U' Tuition
Meets Par
In Big Ten
The University's tuition fees are
no longer out of line with Big Ten
fee schedules, according to Univer-
sity Vice-President Wilbur K. Pier-
pont.
"Historically, the University's fees
have been considered high in the
Big Ten. However, recent increases
i nother institutions have brought
their fees to the level of the Uni-
versity or higher," Pierpont said.
Northwestern University has the
highest tuition rate in the Big
Ten. A privately owned school,
tuition costs $555 per year and in-
cludes student enterprises, library.
practice, and laboratory 'fees. Pur-
due, Indiana and Minnesota are
among the schools which charge
the lowest tuition.
Fees Were Increased
The last University tuition in-
crease went into effect in the fall
of 1955. Non-resident fees were
increased from $215 to $235 per
semester and resident fees were
boosted from $90 to $100.
Tuition fees comprise 20 per cent
of the University's general fund
expenses, grossing almost seven
million dollars per year.
The remaining 80 per cent is
received from the state and other
sources.
Pierpont pointed out that $7.50
received per semester from full
time women students is allocated
to the League, six dollars per man
is given to the Union, five dollars
per student to inter-collegiate ath-
letics, $1.25 to the alumni associ-
ation, and $5.50 to student activi-
ties.
"The remainder of the money
goes into the University's general
fund for the general support of
the University," Pierpont declared.'
The general fund covers the ex-
penses for all the University's
schools and colleges, plant opera-
tions, administrative services, Dean
of Men and Women offices, stu-
dent services, admissions and
libraries.
Tuition payments are approved
by the Board of Regents. Estab-
lishment of all fees are subject to
consideration by the fees com-
mittee, directors, deans, adminis-
trative officers, and finally ap-
proved by the Regents.

DANIEL'S

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Artc aeved

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Organization Notices
Kappa Phi, PledgingFceremony, 7:30 ners and Advanced, 7:30 p.m., Bar-
p.m., Green Room, First Methodist bour Gym.
Church. * * *
Lutheran Student Association, Ves-
Christian Science Organization, Meet- per Service, 9:30 p.m., Student Chapel.
ing, 7:30 p.m., Upper Room, Lane Hall.
* * *
Pi Lambda Theta, Panel Discussion International Center, Tea, 4:30-6 p.m.
by Foreign Educators, 7:30 p.m. Rack- Rackham Assembly.
ham Assembly.i j.
* * I Alpha Phi Omega, Meeting with
Modern Dance Club, Meeting, Begin- Lambda Phi Chapter, 7:30 p.m. Union.

Political Issues Club, Organizational
Meeting, 8 p.m., Room Z, Union.
Graduate Mixer, 9-12 p.m., Friday,
.tRackham Assembly Hall.
Congregational and Disciples Student
Guild, Open House, 8 p.m. Friday,
Guild House.
Neuman Club, Pumpkin Party, 8 p.m.,
Friday, Father Richard Center.
* , *
Hawaiian Club, Social Function, 7:30
p.m., Friday, Intramural Building.
Wesleyan Guild, Halloween Party, 8
p.m., Friday, wesley Lounge.
Neuman Club, Homecoming Dinner, 6
p.m. Saturday, Father Richard Center.

Speech Dept.
Gives Plays
The speech department's first
Experimental Playbill of the 1956-
57 season will feature two one-act
plays, "The Devil and Daniel
Webster" by Stephan Vincent
Benet, and act III of- Louis Coxe
and Robert Chapman's drama,
"Billy Budd".
They will be presented at 8 p.m.
tomorrow and Saturday in Lane
Hall. There will be no admission

IMPORTED CASHMERES
BY L.YLE AND SCOTT
OF HAWICK, SCOTLAND
Just feel the texture ... look at the flawless knit, subtle full
fashioning in these superb Lyle and Scott cashmere classics
from Scotland! Cardigan and short sleeved pullover come
in a rainbow-lovely range of colors and are Mitin@ moth.
proofed for their whole long lives! Sizes 34-40.

-Daily-Mike Kraft
NIKOLA GUBIN
musical maintenance man
with General Vrongel to Yugo-
slavia to escape the Communists."
But in Yugoslavia, between the
World Wars, Gubin found time to
become a musician. From 1926 to
1944, he played cello in the Dub-
rovnik Philharmonic Orchestra.
Likes Opera
"But I do not play music any
Group Offers
'Melodrama'
The second act of Augustin
Daly's melodrama, "Under the
Gaslight" will be featured on
Studio Sampler at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow over WPAG-TV.
"Under the -Gaslight," which
had its New York premiere in
1867, highlights a scene in which
the hero is tied to the railroad
tracks. In the best 19th century
dramatic style, rescue arrives just
in the nick of time.
The program will be produced
and presented by the University
speech department, in cooperation
with the television office and
WPAG-TV, the local UHF outlet.

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