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October 21, 1956 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-21

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2191956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SUNDAY, 00T4>BER 21,1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Lowest Card
Helps Defeat
Bridge Foe
By EDGAR SIMONS
Daily Bridge Columnist
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LANE HALL:
New Religious Head
Supplements Staff

Poll Upsets
Usual Ideas
About Voting

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It is rare that the low cards in a
hand are ever remembered. In this
hand it was possession of a very
low card, the two of clubs, which
was instrumental in fulfilling the
contract.
West opened the king of clubs
and east, following a common con-
vention, played the seven, his
second highest club. South, in
need of a miracle, played the five
of clubs hoping to induce repeated
club leads. West continued the six
of clubs, also conventional, being
his fourth highest club.
East played the jack which south
won with the queen. Declarer could
count eight tricks for his side.
There was a possibility that west
held both missing aces, and if he
could be kept on lead south's ten
of clubs would be protected.
Thus south led a spade towards,
the king. This east won with the
ace and dutifully returned his re-
maining club, the four. South, still
looking for a miracle, played the
deuce of clubs.
West could have played the eight
and then won a total of four clubs
and two major suit aces-for down
two. But he saw an opportunity to
keep east on lead for a heart re-
turn to his ace-queen-for down
three. Thus he gleefully played his
three of clubs under the two and
four.
East was visibly shaken by win-
ning the trick with his four, and he
could remember only that his part-
ner had played the nine of spades
on the first leadof the suit..
Thinking this card signalled in-
terest in that suit, east led a spade.
South now gathered in his nine
tricks, fulfilling his contract, and
giving thanks to the two of clubs
for keeping the lead in east's hand.
East's play was thoughtless, for
if south had the ace of hearts he
would have taken -off his nine
tricks after winning the queen of
of clubs. But somehow even an
opponents error cannot detract
from the thrill of making a hand
because of possession of the lowest
card in the deck.
Nurses Select
ICN Delegate
Gail Grippen, '57 N, will pre-
sent student nurses from Michigan
at the 'International Congress of
Nurses at Rome in May, 1957.
Miss Grippen was selected as
delegate at the Michigan Student
Nurses Association convention in
Lansing last week.
Ruth Ann Goehner, '58N, was
elected first vice-president of the
state association, an office which
also includes president-elect for
the association next year.;

By DALE McGkiEE
Sitting in his Lane Hall office,
Harold Duerksen may give the
first impression of a straight for-
ward "behind-the-desk" type com-
mittee worker.
Let a little conversation brighten
up ,his desk-and-filing cabinet
quarters, however, and the new
program director for the Office of
Religious Affairs, reveals a great
resource of personal warmth.
Lanky young - Duerksen smiles
and laughs as he speaks of re-
ligious belief, and yet his words
are produced intently serious and
sincere.
Dissatisfied with 'Cliche'
"I'm simply not satisfied with
the 'cliche' type of religion," he
said. "Every area of life has some
problem leaning on religion in one
form or another, and that's the
kind of thing I like to get at."
Through his capacity as pro-
gram director Duerksen is work-
ing in connection with the Uni-
versity's recently revised plan for
religious stimulus. .
Duerksen voiced enthusiastic
hopes for making new religious
sources available to the campus
and for better coordinating the
activities of religious foundations
at the primary agencies of the
resources.
Musical Appreciation
As from somewhere just below
the rafters of Lane Hall a band
burst exuberantly into modified
discord, he mused, "At times it can
be rather hard to think about re-
ligion around here. I'm afraid my
musical appreciation doesn't quite
reach, the second floor."
Eyes rolled mullingly upward.
,Prior to his appointment to the
University, the new director spent
three years studying at Union
Theological Seminary in New York
City and one year as a Menonite
pastor in his home state of Kan-

Arab Extremists Desire Lands

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-Daily-VernSoden
RELIGIOUS DIRECTOR-Har-
old Duerksen opposes "cliche
type of religion."
interest in working with people.
young people in particular, was
proliferated there.
Lived in Manhattan
During his studies at Union,
Duerksen lived for a year in Man-
hattan's lower east'side investi-
gating the problems of the under-
privileged.
"That was quite an experience,"
he commented. "It got to the
point where you weren't at all
excited about the murder next
door.'
Duerksen also worked with
young people for some time at
New York's famed Riverside
Church.
"My interest in people in gene-
ral, especially after college, made
me aware that most problems peo-
ple have ultimately center around'
some religious question," he ex-
plained.

Contrary to common belief, la-
bor does not vote as a bloc, Uni-
versity Survey Research Center
shows after careful analysis of
actual voting'behavior of a nation-
wide sample of citizens in the 1948,
1952, and 1954 elections.
In fact about one third of the.
workingmen who have gone to the
polls in recent national elections
have voted Republican.
The survey also explodes several
other popular myths. For instance,
Republican businessmen outnum-
ber their Democratic counterparts
outside the southern states by only
4 to 3
But Republicans in this cate-
gory seem more likely to express
their views at the polls, while
Democrats have a greater tendency
to cross party lines or stay at
home on election day.
Those who believe that Catho-
lics follow a political line, accord-
ing to the Survey are also inac-
curate.
Although there is reason to be-
lieve that Catholics would con-
form to group standards on some
political issues-birth control leg-
islation, for instance-there is no
indication that Catholic standards
exist for most run-of-the-mill po-
litical issues.
Dana Receives
Special Medal
Dean-Emeritus Samuel T. Dana
of the School of Natural Resources
has been awarded the Sir Wil-
liam Schlich Memorial Medal for
distinguished services to forestry.
Award was one of four made for
outstanding services to forestry at
the 5th annual meeting of the
Society of American Foresters.

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beautiful futu re!i Thin
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By THOMAS P. WHITNEY
Associated Press News Analyst
There is nothing that Arab na
tionalist extremists would like t
do better than to toss the Britis
out of the Arabian Peninsul;
completely.
Whenever they get their hand
free of the Suez crisis and th
Israel problem, it is reasonable t
expect they will actually try to d
it.
In order to get the British of
the peninsula, the Arab nationa
lists woulud have to either con
quer by military force or other
wise force British departure froi
one British colony-Aden-fiv
protectorates - Aden, Kuwai
Bahrein, Qatar and the Trucia
States-and one nominally inde
pendent state-the Sultanate o
Muscat and Oman.
Dominate Coast Line
These territories dominate near
ly the entire coastline of th
Arabian Peninsula all the wa
from its southwest corner at th
Straits of Bab el Mandeb aroun
into the head of the Persian Gulf
Yet their hold is precariou
partly because of the growin
force of Arab nationalism, partl
because in most of the territorie
there is no British garrison, bu
mostly because of the. juridicia
situation in which Britain does no
claim sovereignty over any of th
areas except the colony of Aden
which has an area of only 7
square miles.
Here is a brief description o
each of these territories, all o
which are populated by Arab
speaking peoples.
The colony of'Aden consists o
the city of Aden, a small bit o
Arabian mainland, and the islan
af Perim in the middle of th
strategic Straits of Bab el Man
deb.
Its population is about 150,000
Its chief economic activity is as
sociated with the port of Aden
Have Treaty Relations
Aden Protectorate runs fron
Yemen about half-way along th(
southern end of the Arabian pe
ninsula. Its area is estimated a
some 112,000 square miles-about

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the same as that of Arizona-and
its population at a little less than
one million.
The Arab chiefs of the protec-
torate have treaty relations with
Britain.
Aden is threatened both from
outside and inside by forces hos-
tile to British rule. Earlier this
year there were anti-British dem-
onstrations in the city of Aden,
while forces of the Arabian state
of Yemen were attempting to raid
Aden territory from the north.
Yemen would like to drive the
British out of Aden and in this aim
has Egyptian and Soviet suppoprt.
Earlier this year the ruler of
Yemen made a trip to the Soviet
Union in an effort to gain support
against the British. The British
have announced their determina-
tion to hold Aden at all costs.
Rich Territory
Kuwait is located at the head of
the Persian Gulf next to Iraq and
is one of the richest pieces of
territory ino the world. Some 55
million tons of oil were pumped
out of Kuwait wells in 1955.
This made the small sheikhdom
the fourth largest oil producer in
the world-behind only the United
States, Venezuela and the Soviet
Union.
Disposition of the oil revenue
is controlled by the ruling family
of the sheikhdom and its head
Sheikh Abdullah al Salim al Sa-
bah. He has used the revenue notE
only for luxurious maintenance of
himself and his relatives but also
for the welfare of his people.
Cast Greedy Eyes
The leaders of the Arab world
cast greedy eyes at Kuwait's
wealth. They make no secret of
the fact they would like to get

their hands on it in order, they
say, to put it to use for "all Arabs"
instead of just those in Kuwait.
The Bahrein Islands are only
some 213 square miles in area
with a population of about 120,000.
They produce about 11/2 million
tons of petroleum a year.
The production is American-
controlled but Bahrein has a
treaty with Britain which gives
the British control over its for-
eign relations.
Arab nationalism has reached
Bahrein. In March riots broke
out against the ruling sheikh's
British adviser, Sir C. D. Belgrave
and the British government, an-
xious to avoid a showdown like
that over Gen. Glubb in Jordan,
induced him to resign.
Produces Oil;
Qatar in 1955 produced about{
five million tons of oil. Its area
is about 8,000 square miles and its
population about 25,000. It is a
peninsula jutting out into the
Persian gulf.
The Trucial States constitute
an ill-defined and large area along
the Persian Gulf below Qatar.
Seven sheikhs controlling diffe-
rent sections of the area have
treaty relations with Great Brit-
ain. Total population is about 70,-
000.
The Sultanate of Muscat and
Oman runs along the Arabian
Peninsula coastline approximate-
ly from the mouth of the Persian.
Gulf to the vicinity of the Aden
protectorate. The area has been
estimated at some 82,000 square
miles and population at over half
a million. The Sultan has treaty
relations with Britain but his
state, unlike the others is juri-
dicially independent.

U 4
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

sas. Duerksen is yet a very young o o o o 4
Duerksen extolled the Union man and it is surprising to see ~
Seminary, praising it for its non- "thought-furrows" appearing on SYLVIAVSTUDIO Of
denominational character and its his forehead. But he seems to
lack of rigid dogma, perform a great task and that c DANCE
He explained that much of his means a great deal. CLASSES in
D m m m m om KINDERDANC
(Pre-School Children I
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11

m

There's Lots Of Talk
t Michigan
and on other Campuses too! This adds up to a
continuing need for more and more communica-
tions facilfties. As the world's largest manufactur-
er of such equipment, Western Electric needs some
additional top-flight engineers, scientists and
mathematicians, the kind that are here on the
Ann Arbor campus.
Let's Talk It Over
Consult our Company representatives in
R.O.T.C. Rifle Range Building
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
October 23 - 24 -25
Learn about the opportunities for you with this

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Uoffices ,

* MAIN OFFICE
101-107 S. Main St.

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serve

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* NICKELS ARCADE
330 S. State Street
" NEAR 'ENGINE ARCH'
1108 South University
* PACKARD-BROCKMAN
1923 Packard
* WHITMORE LAKE
9571 N. Main St.

you

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES
Be sure your valuable pap
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loss, theft, destruction-with
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Here's Pat
She knows what Michigan winters aret!
She knows, too; despite their vigor,
she'll always be cozy warm
in her imported frog-fastened
Loden Coat, with its own
detachable hood.
In Loden Green or Loden Grey.
$39.95

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