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October 18, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-18

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1956

THE MCMGAN DAMY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, OC7IOB1~R 18, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DULY PAGE TIIIIEE

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD-Prof. Lester Thonssen cites reasons
for commending contents of the Congressional Record.
Prof.Thonssen Coimends
Congressional Record Text

V1,

IM -- TV A tiT" V- IM A Vr R C

By DIANE LaBAKAS
Prof. Lester Thonssen, president,
of the Speech Association of
America, recomended that speech
students read the Congressional
Record because of its "great an-
thology in comprehensiveness and
courage."
Speaking before more than 200
people yesterday on "Thoughts on
a Great American Institution" in
Rackham Auditorium, Prof. Thons-
sen noted that Americans do not
take full advantage of the Con-
gressional Record. "It is the best
source of Congressional informa-
tion and speeches," he declared.
A member of New York City
College's speech department, Prof.
Thonssen, commented that the
Congressional Record costs $1.50
a month and entails extensive
reading.
"To be a reader of the Congres-
sional Record one has to have a
hospitailty of mind for talk," he
explained. "The Congressional
Record prints more than 24,000
pages a year which cost taxpayers
more than $1 million. When you
have approximately five volumes
to read a week, you then encoun-
ter the problem of finding space."
Variety of Speeches
The variety of the speeches will
prove invaluable to speech stu-
dents as a text and source book of
public addresses, Prof. Thonssen
said.
"A number of speeches from the
past by Benjamin Franklin, Daniel
Webster and other historical fig-
ures are often reprinted."
Many student orations are
printed along with contemporary
addresses by people from all sec-

tions of the country, Prof. Thons-
sen noted..
He remarked that ceremonial
oratory along with forms of debate
and discussion comprised a good
deal of the Congressional Record.
"Prayers and speeches made on
birthdays and the passing of some
person are often printed. I heard
of one man who buys the Congres-
sional Record just to read who has
died."
Prof. Thonssen declared that
students would be impressed by
the various techniques used by
the speakers. He recalled one in-
stance where there was a long de-
bate between Senator Bourke
Hickenlooper of Iowa and Senator
Homer Capehart of Indiana over
what female sheep were called.
Milliken Criticizes
"Instances and references to pos-
ture and gesture are often men-
tibned. Senator Eugene Milliken
frequently criticized Senator Hu-

Professors
Discourage
Space Trips.
By DEBORA WEISSTEIN
Two University professors have
dampened the spirits of interplane-
tary flight enthusiasts who plan a
trip through space in the near
future.
Prof. Thomas C. Adamson andl
Prof. Richard B. Morrison of the
engineering school think that too
much publicity about space travel
in recent years has given people
the idea that we can fly to the
moon or go 'to Paris in an hour
via human-carrying missiles.
Their comments were in response
to "Vision," a new book on air
travel by Harold Aransfield. The
book claims that "Air travel in
outer space rests with materials
engineers who must create metals
to penetrate thermal barriers ---
and that it is perfectly possible
to build a satellite vehicle or take
a trip to the moon."r
Oversimplification
The profesosrs state, this is an
oversimblification. "Too many en-
gineering, medical, material, me-
chanical and economic problems
created by space travel make it
a very remote possibility at this
point.
Prof. Adamson explains that one
o the main difficulties in this type
of travel is that of direction be-
cause the engine is not running
during most of the flight.
Thermal Barrier Problems
"Another problem," says Prof.
Morrison, "is that of the thermal
barrier. When the plane starts out,
It is going at a comparatively slow
speed. When it is on its way back
to earth, it approaches the thermal
barrier. It has picked up a tra-
mendous amount of speed and
heat. At this high speed it is no
longer a question of "cooking the
pilot" but of melting the metals
which make up the plane."
Finding suitable metals is the
work of the materials engineers.
For example, aluminum which
has a low melting point has a
high heat transferance and is
easier to. keep cool than stainless
steel which has a high melting
point but a low heat transferance.
The difficulties in finding the
right metals lie in the complexities
of the requirements.
Prof Adamson adds that it is
important to find out what hap-
pens to human bodies when they
reach space and strong cosmic and
ultra violet rays.
It also has been found that at
very high acceleration, the human
brain loses its sense of direction.
This is dangerous in piloting a
plane or in emergencies where full
brain power is needed
"Even if we solved all these prob-
lems," declared Prof. Morrison,
"the expenses incurred in a space
travel project would involve the
entire effort of the United States
economy."
Firestone
Brake Special
for safe year-round driving
Winer driving
demandspeak
performoc..

By SHIRLEY CROOG
Emily Dickinson's "brevity of
wit" and "exacting" words place
her next in merit to the Latin
poet, Horace, according to Prof.
Thomas H. Johnson, author and
critic.
A scholar of Miss Dickinson's
works and editor of a recent defi-
nitive edition of her letters, Prof.
Johnson spoke of the poet both
as a person and artist to a Rack-
ham audience yesterday.
Prof. Johnson noted that Miss
Dickinson's poetry, which is ilmost
completely autobiographical, not
only expresses the emotion and
ideas which she herself projected
but also reveals her intense con-
cern with words.
Importance of Words
Aware of the importance of
words, "she envisioned language as
a sacrament," Johnson declared,
feeling that a misspoken word
"breeds infection."
Concerned with the end of cre-
ativity, the interpretative biogra-
pher of Miss Dickinson's life as-
serted the poet felt "form was in-
herently part of the idea" in art.
In most of her poems, her "cre-
ativity was aflood," he added.
Her successes, particularly in
1862 and 1863, showed that she
was increasingly conscious of "fil-
ing" her lines for "exact and sharp
images."
Her poems dealing with the fail-
ure of inspiration were written
during her later years when, ac-
cording to Johnson, she was be-
ginning to feel her "own well of
creativity was drying up."
Frugality Stressed
Unlike Chaucer and Byron, Miss
Dickinson could not tell stories in
her poetry as "Jonathan Swift
could not have written 'Alice in
Wonderland'." Rarely writing more
than 20 lines in a poem, Miss
Dickinson's frugality was her ob-
jective and means of "achieving a
single moment of intensity."

Ft,

-Daily-Don Watkins
EMULY DICKINSON'S POETRY-Speaking at lecture sponsored
by the English Department in Rackham Amphitheatre yesterday,
Prof. Thomas H. Johnson, author and critic, noted the merits of
Emily Dickinson as a poet and person.

I

WORD IMPORTANCE:
Prof. Johnson Lauds Dickinson

11

U

I

bert Humphrey, and
Douglas for pointing
while arguing."

Senator Paul
at each other

Prof. Thonssen remarked that
the Congressional Record also
prints interesting miscellaneous
articles such as the long fillibus-
ters by Senator Wayne Morse on
the Taft-Hartley Bill and Huey
Long's attack on the NIRA.
"This abundance of miscellan-
eous material is divided evenly be-
tween the text and the appendix,
Large numbers of student essays:
poetry, articles from newspapers,
magazines, and journals comprise
the majority of this miscellaneous
material."
Prof. Thonssen noted that among
all the articles printed, he was
particularly impressed by a poem
entitled, "Ode to White House
Squirrels."

I

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Get
Yourself
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Pardn er

WCBN
The Campus Broadcasting Network
announces the resignation of
PETER L. WOLFF
Director of Publicity
and Public Relations

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A $3.50
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Nov. 19: DUCK SOUP (Marx Bros., U.S.,
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Dec. 3: THE LOVE ON JEANNE NEY (dir.
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Dec. 17: KAMERADSCHAFT (dir. by G. W.
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