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October 14, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-14

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f StlNDAY, OCTOBER 14,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14,1956 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Duplicate Hand Is Played
Several Different Ways

By EDGAR SIMONS
Daily Bridge Columnist

v
4
w
4 104
V Q1076
f J9653
40 102

N
Q386
J5
AQ108
983
E
4 A
V 9853
f*KZ
4 AKQ764
S
K97532
AK4
74
J5

N
e

S
1S
2S
Sp

Bidding:
W N
P 2C
P P
P 4S

E
P
3C
all pass

Today's hand was extracted
from the weekly duplicate game
held at the League on ThursdayI
evenings. As with all hands, it was
bid, played, and defended in many
different ways, some of which are
reported here.
South, holding two and a half
honor tricks and a good rebiddable
suit, was well within his rights
in opening the bidding. North,
being too strong for a direct two
spade raise and too weak for a
three spade jump, selected the two
club bid to give his partner maxi-
mum freedom in his rebid.
East now had no bid available,
and knowing he would have an-
other turn, passed. South bid two
spades, and when north passed
east bid three clubs. West, who
had been dozing peacefully with
only three points, gasped for a
review of the bidding. West then
passed and north made a final
stab at four spades.
West recovered in time to lead
the ten of clubs, east winning with
the queen. East played the king
and then continued with the sce
of clubs, hop'ing to promote a
trump trick in west's hand. How-
ever, south trumped with the king.
Declarer then led a spade, east's
ace winning. East exited with a
heart which was won by south. At
this point the contract depended
on the diamond finesse. This failed
and south was down.
Both south and east could have
been cleverer on this hand. At
another table, where the bidding
also had reached four spades,
south found a way to make the
hand.
After trumping the third round
of clubs with the king, this de-
clarer played his ace and king of
hearts and then trumped his last
heart in the dummy. Now he called
for the queen of spades which was
won by east's ace.
If east led a club or a heart
I t Ormavnizanton I1

south would discard his losing
diamond and trump in the dum-
my; a diamond lead would end
any need for a finesse. So this
south made his four spades.
At yet another table, east found
a way to preventathis throw in
play of south. Before leading his
third round of clubs, this east
played out the ace of spades.
Now the losing diamond finesse
had to be taken, for down one.
Old Election
Sermons Put
on Exhibition
Religion sounded the keynote of
election speeches in this country
in the Seventeenth and Eighteent~h
Centuries, Howard H. Peckham,
director of The University Clem-
ents Library and associate pro-
fessor of history, said recently.
"In fact, sermons stressing man's
obligation to God and his fellow-
men in electing the proper admin-
istrators were customarily deliver-
ed in New England in these cen-
turies," he said.
The first Massachusetts election
sermon known to be extant is a'
featured item in the current exhi-
bition, "Early Political Cam-
paigns," in the Clements Library.
Entitled "The Cause of God and
His People in New England," this
sermon was delivered by John
Higginson in Boston, May 27, 1663
before the Honourable General
Court of the Massachusetts Colony.
"Higginson," Peckham said,
"speaks for the elders who had
retired from public affairs but who
were concerned over the indepen-
dence of some of the younger
colonial administrators."
In his sermon Higginson urged,
"All should be careful that there
may be a peaceable transaction
of the public affaires, and a peace-
able subjection to the government
here, and that all the people as
one Man do manifest their due
sense of the many.
Blessings they' have enjoyed un-
der the present Government for so
many years, .that there may be
conjoyned Prayers and endeavors
for the continuance of it, ac-
cording to the Patent, which under
God and the King is to be acknow-
ledged as the foundation of the
Civil Government here."
Higginson recommends, "When
the matter requires more than
ordinary help from the Lord him-
self, and that the Lord seems to
withdraw and-to be asleep, then
the servants of God must awaken
him by Importunate Prayers, as
the disciples in the storm did
awake our Savior, saying, 'Lord,
save us or we perish.'"

Study Aid
Sponsored
ByNATO
For the second year the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization will
sponsor ,a scholarship program to
further the study of the common
traditions, historical experience
and present needs of the North
Atlantic community, it was an-
nounced by the Institute of Inter-
national Education recently.
All American candidates will be'
chosen by the Board of Foreign
Scholarships, ten leading educators
and educational administrators ap-
pointed by the President of the
United States. These candidates
will be submitted by the Depart-
ment of State to NATO's interna-
tional selection committee which
will make the awards from appli-
cants of all NATO countries.
_Competition in the United States
closes Nov. 1, 1956. Candidates who
have applied for United States
Government foreign study grants
under the Fulbright Act may also
enter the NATO competition.
Awards for the 1957-58 academic
year will be announced April 4,
1957, the 8th anniversary of the
signing of the North Atlantic
Treaty.
Applicants for the NATO schol-
arships must be United States citi-
zens in good health. Preference
will be given to candidates with
some graduate training. Language
proficiency will be essential for
placement in non-English-speak-
ing countries. Scholars will be
selected on the basis of their
scholastic record, the institutions
at which they propose to pursue
their studies, and their subject of
study. Grants will be 500,000
French francs for one academic
year of study plus travel expenses.
Equal Distribution
The international selection com-
mittee will aim at an equitable
distribution of awards among the
member states. This is a program
for exchanges among all NATO
nations rather than between the
United States and a limited num-
ber of other countries.
The aim of the NATO fellowship
program is to further the idea of
an Atlantic Community by en-
couraging the study of the histori-
cal, political, legal, social, linguis-
tic, economic and strategic prob-
lems that will reveal the common
traditions, historical experience
and present needs of the North
Atlantic area considered as a com-
munity. Preference will be given to
candidates in the humanities and
the social sciences. Projects should
be directly related to some aspect
or problem of the Atlantic com-
munity.
Candidates for NATO scholar-
ships should apply to the Insti-
tute of International Education, 1
East 67th Street, New York City.

Wayne State
Group Opens
Play Season
Eugene O'Neill's "The Great God f
Brown," which opened the Wayne
State University Theatre season,4
will be presented for the last 3 of
five performances, Oct. 18, 19, 20
at 8:30 p.m.
In presenting "The Great God;
Brown," the theatre is offering the
first recorded- public performance
in Detroit of a major work by
America's first internationally ac-
claimed playwright. "The Great
God Brown" is an example of the
kind of playwriting which brought
him this renown, playwriting in
which he lifted American drama
out of provincialism -or imitation'
of the European, and freed it fromi
its old rigid form in a style often
labeled "expressionistic."
Transcends Realism;
Written in 1915, "The Great}
God Brown" attempts to transcend
realism and the old rigidities by.
using masks which show that the
characters are not to be taken as,
simple individuals. The plot con-
cerns the struggle between a sensi-
tive artist and a commercial suc-
cess, and the theme is that of
human aspiration and frustration.
Perhaps the most puzzling of all
O'Neill's plays, it suggests an at-
tempt to find some peace giving{
meaning behind th'e frustrations of1
life.
The 1956-57 season will also in-
clude "An Italian Straw Hat," an
unusual musical comedy by Eugene
Labiche and Marc-Michel, "The
Father," masterpiece of naturalis-1
tic tragedy by August Strindberg,
''Thieves' Carnival," popular
French French farce by Jean
Anouilh, "The Beautiful People,"
William Saroyan's compassionate
picture of the little people of the
world, and Shakespeare's "The
Tempest," done with the rarely
performed Sibelius score, and pre-,
sented with the assistance of the
University Symphony Orchestra
and Dance Workshop. The season'
closes with the spring dance con-
cert by the Dance Workshop and
a production of Anatole France's
medieval farce, "The Man Who
Married a Dumb Wife."
Rent a
TYPEWRITER
(portables)
Ask about our
Rental Purchase Plan

Case Club JudgesChosen
The 19 student judges for the
1956-57 academic year of the Case Robert B. Webster, '57L, George
Clubs of the University Law School Kircos, '57L, Allan W. Grossman,
have been selected, it was an- '57L, Sidney C. Kleinman, '57L,
nounced recently.
o rMonte K. Marshall, '57L, John H.
The Case Clubs are designed to Fildew, '57L, Robert W. Steele,
give future lawyers a chance to Fil, ALn Robert 'L Sele.'
prepare .and present cases ill a 1'57L, Alan Raywid, '57L, William
realistic courtroom setting. An R. Luney, '57L, A. Duncan Whita-.
extra-curricular activity of the law ker, '57L, Richard C. King, '57L,
school, 90 per cent of all first year Charles V. Swan, '57L, John A.
law students enter the case club Beach, '57L, Gerald A. Fix, '57L,
competition. James B. Linville, '57L, John F.
This year's judges are: Edward i Wilson, '57L and Harry N. Blum,
Adkins, '57L, Paul R. Jenkins, '57L, '57L.
:..;'nerno

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Take a
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your path
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engineering

Notices
Congregational and Disciples Guild We have a wide selection
Open House, After Game, Guild House.
OpnHue 3of, patterns and yarns for F ES A N O
Westminister Student Fellowship, all t vhes of sweaters
Post-Game Picnic, 5:30 p.m., Presbyter- .eA,
tan Student Center.LII 216 W. William Street Ann Arbor, Michigan
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Meet- YARN CRAFT SH "'P Te'epho"e NO 8-8014
Ing 4 p.m., Sunday, Lane Hall, Speaker:
Dr. Orville Walters, "Peace of Mind."
Unitarian Student Group, Meeting, 7 10 Nickels Arcade NO 2-0303 We Have All Kinds of Glass-Mirrors and Furniture Tops.
p.m. Sunday, First Unitarian Church, (>- emt<c t<yo<vooo<)> < >O<> -0 We Have the Nationally Advertised Paints.
f Speaker: Dr. Nanny, "Religion and Bi--___________
ology" Transportation 6:45 p.m.,Sun- 0=0 ┬░ooooeo<)oocst>" a4=" You Can Park Right .in Front of Our Store.
day, Chapman Room.
. SYLVIA STUDIO
Roger Williams Fellowship, Bible v
StudrW9:45amSualous e WE HAVE BEEN SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR 67 YEARS
Study, 9:45 a.m., Sunday, Guild House.DNC
a * * DANCE
Union Coed Show, Mass Meeting, For CLASSES in
all interested, 7 p.m. Sunday, Union
Ballroom. 0 KINDERDANCE___________________________ ___________
*a* r .(Pre-School Children)
Student Religious Association, Folc { ACADEMIC BALLET SYLVIA HAMER, L.C.C.A
Dancing, 71:30-10 p.m. Monday. Land for Advanced and Phone NO 8-8066 or
Hall. *'Professionals NO 8-7227
a TAP 525 E. Liberty' CVE E TOR 9 7
SGC Administrative Wing, Mass Try- COLLEGEcTOURSt1957
out Meeting, 4 p.m., Monday Union BALLRO5ME.ici etBd
Ballroom. -oOU -o -o0-- oO--0-0- QO-c- O
_ __ ___ __DURING SPRING VACATION
NUMBER 3 MESSAGE TO FRESHMEN APRIL 5th to APRIL 74th
jiAA Via Eastern Airlines Super G Constellation service, Hotel Ac-
M commodations at the Golden Gate.
M ore reemCollegeRate: $169.00 including roundtrip airtransportation, tax, hotel
Via Pan American World Airways Stratocruiser, Service hotel
accommodations at the Bermudina.
Number 4 will follow BERMUDA Rate: $276.00 including roundtrip airtransportation from De-
troit, tax, accommodations at the hotel, two meals per day,
sightseeing, transfers, cruise around the islands, beach parties,
YOU HAVE FOUND more freedom in managing your own time schedule etc.
Via Guest Airways Mexico Constellation service. Accommoda-
than you had in high school, This greater freedom definitely implies a MEIC tions at hotel Virreyes in Mexico, Victoria in Taxco and Palacio
greater responsibility on your part to utilize time to your own advantage. Tropical in Acapulco.
Rate: $36900 including roundtrip air transportation, hotel
If you do not shoulder this responsibility, you'll fail to acquire the skill accommodations, transfers, sightseeing, dinner in Mexico City,
all breakfasts, all meals in Acapulco, all sightseeing and bull-
which you need and which will be yours for the doing. Necessity whets fight tickets.
one's wits for the struggle of life. College training should bring to light
the hidden talents and abilities of each individual and should give neces-
sary disciplinary guidance. To succeed will require long, continued, and
exacting work. 14 NICKELS ARCADE NO 3-8597
Your work in college places you in business for yourself. This may j please senddetaileditineraryontour to
IgPlease send detailed itinerary on yoTrtd d
be your first experience on being on your own. The outcome will depend

Specialized training program
Earn a regular professional engineering salary as you
work on carefully rotated assignments giving you a
comprehensive view of RCA engineering. Your indi-
vidual interests are considered and you have every
chance for permanent assignment in the area you
prefer. Your work gets careful review under RCA's
advancement plan and you benefit from guidance of
experienced engineers and interested management.
Following training, you will enter development and de.
sign engineering in such fields as Radar, Airborne Elec-
tronics, Computers, -Missile Electronics. For manu-
facturing engineers, there are positions in quality;
material orproduction control, test equipment design;
methods. You may also enter development, design or
manufacture of electron tubes, semiconductor com-
ponents or television.
Direct hire
If you are qualified by experience or advanced educa-
Son, your interests may point to a direct assignment.
The RCA management representative will be glad to
help you. Many fields are open ... from research, sys-
tems, design and development to manufacturing engi-
neering... in aviation and missile electronics, as well
as radar, electron tubes, computers, and many other
challenging fields.
...and you advance
Small engineering groups mean recognition for initi.
ative and ability, leading on to advancement that's
professional as well as financial. RCA further helps
your development through reimbursement for gradu-
ate study under a liberal tuition refund plan.
Now. . for a longer look at RCA
See your placement director about an appointment
with an RCA engineering management representative
who will be on campus ...

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