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October 09, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-09

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.......... ..........

1956

'1'l E IVHCMIGA.N DAILY

PAGE THREE

1956 TUE frUCUUiA1~ flAiL~ PAGE THREE

IVIIIIIII I i

Larsen

Fires

World

Series'

irst

Perfect

Game

U

h cene from the
SIDELINES
f r# by Dick Cramer
A Bright Grid Outlook
F ANYTHING can be predicted in the game of football, you can1
be sure that Michigan's present occupancy of last place in the Big
Ten will soon be ended.
In fact, if Saturday's game with Michigan State was any indica-
tion, the Wolverines may well be developing *one of their finest teamsj
A in recent years. Both offensively and defensively they appeared
stronger than at the same point in the 1955 season.
Even the news today that All-American left end Ron Kramer
suffered a hairline fracture in a bone in his left hand is not too
discouraging. Kramer participated in the first workouts of the week1
and, despite much padding and tape over his left hand, will probably
play this weekend against Army.
Likewise, the severely bruised hip of Terry Barr is riot expected to
, revent that star right halfback from starting Saturday.
The iscore of the Michigan State game was deceiving, just as it
was in last year's contest with the Spartans. Then it was Michigan
making the most of opportunities. . .. . . ...-, .
to win, 14-7, while the Spartans
dominated play. This year the
Spartans failed to generate much
offense, but their alertness gave:
them a 9-0 triumph over a more
impressive Wolverine squad.
Of course, opportunism is one of
the marks of a good football
team. But it is more the mark of>
a totally experienced squad. In
that respect, Michigan State was
superior.
One of Michigan's new additions,
sophomore John Herrnstein at
fullback, had the misfortune to
contribute the two miscues that
:' helped to turn the tide in favor .:
of Michigan State. His intercepted
pass and fumble set up both Spar- '
tan scores.
The real sadness in this situation
comes from the fact that Herrn- RON KRAMER
stein will be forgotten for having ...injured, but will play
set up three Wolverine touchdowns
-the three that Just failed to materialize in the Michigan-dominated
first half.
Herrnstein averaged four yards gained in 13 carries for the top
record on the team and it was his powerful drives through the center
of the line that were instrumental in Michigan's scoring threats. Ile
continued to grind out yardage even after injuring his arm while
providing a key block in the first quarter.s
I But "breaks" were bound to win the game and it was fate that
the almost -phenomenal Herrnstein had to provide them.

Gomberg Breezes
In Dorm Football

17-3 Wins Grid Picks;
Ladies Urged to Enter

By AL JONES
A powerful Gomberg squadt
showed that they are again the
team to be reckoned with in the
Residence Hall "A" football league,
as they trounced Taylor, 28-0, yes-
terday afternoon at South Ferry;
Field.
Gomberg's quarterback and cap-
tain, Bruce Fox, an outstanding
pitcher and fielder on Michigan's
baseball team, showed that he can
also pitch a football. He threw
three touchdown. passes, and pass-
ed for four extra points. The fourth
touchdown Fox scored himself on
a 25 yard run.
In another high-scoring game,

Huber showed that they are an-
other team to watch this year by
rolling over Lloyd, 19-6.
Huber's big gun was Ralph Hut-
chins, who passed two touchdowns
into the hands of big Ron Bernas,
and tossed another six pointed to
Jim Wheat. Hutchins scored the
extra point on a run.
Cooley Downs Wenley
Cooley continued *its winning
ways by turning back a determined1
Wenley squad, 19-12. Kim Greene
scored two touchdowns for the vic-
tors, while Ed Gordon added seven
points for Cooley.
In the closest game of the after-
noon VanTyne and Anderson bat-
tled to a 6-6 tie. In the case of a
tie game at the end of the regu-
lation time, each squad is given
four downs, and the team that ad-
vances the furthest is declared
winner. Anderson won via this
route.
In other residence hall "A"
games Scott downed Strauss, 7-0,
Chicago defeated Hinsdale, 6-0,
Green beat Kelsey, 6-0, Hayden
edged Winchell 7-6, and Michigan
swamped Adams, 13-2.
In a game postponed from last
week Delta Chi defeated Zeta Beta
Tau, /2-0, in a Social Fraternity
"A" contest.
Meanwhile in the Social Fra-
ternity "B" league Pi Lambda Phi
downed Phi Gamma Delta, 13-6,
while Sigma Alpha Epsilon beat
Delta Tau Delta, 6-0.

BOB TURLEY CLEM LABINE
IN THE SIXTH game of the World Series, it will probably be
Turley trying to clinch the Series for the Yankees, and Labine
trying to even it all at three games apiece for the Dodgers,
Series Goes Back to Brooklyn
With Yanks Now Leading, 3-2
(continued from Page 1 1

In a weekend marked by several
upsets, Arnold Brown of 718 Arbor
Street wound up on top of the
heap to take the second week's
Grid Picks prize.
Brown with a record of 17-3,
topped the entire Sports Staff,
missing only the Michigan State,
Washington, and California vic-
tories.
It seems that the female segment
of the campus is a little bashful
about voicing its opinions for out
of '118 entries, only nine were sub-
mitted by members of the fair sex.
Entries for this week's contest
must reach The Daily by Friday
noon. They can be delivered in per-
son to the maindesk on the second
floor of the Student Publications
Building, or mailed to "Grid Picks,"
Michigan . Daily, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor.
Please print or type your name
and address on the entry and don't
forget to include the score of the
Michigan game.
The winner will receive two free
tickets for either the coming at-
traction at the State Theater, "The
Bad Seed," or the next feature at
the Michigan Theaer, "The Best
Things in Life Are Free."
Send your entries in early. Good
luck !

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Lions, Cards1
Lead NFLj
Activity on the pro football front
this' past weekend concluded with
just two .National Football League
clubs still undefeated after two
league games-the Detroit Lions'
in the Western Division and the
Chicago Cardinals in the Eastern.'
The Lions flashed their familiar
title form of two and three years
back Saturday night at Briggs Sta-
dium in flattening the Baltimore
Colts, considered serious contend-
ers, 31-14.
The Cardinals, definite pre-sea-
son underdogs, came up with what
they have lacked in the past-good,
consistent quarterbacking supplied
by Lamor McHan-and it payed
of f for a resounding 35-27 triumph
over the New York Giants, who
were rated quite highly.
Perhaps the biggest surprise of
Sunday's action, however, was the
upset of the favored Los Angeles
Rams by their coastal rivals, the
San, Francisco 49ers, 33-30, with
end Gordie Soltau contributing
four field goals to spark the win.
The highly rated Chicago Bears,
after being stunned last week by
the Colts, got into the win column
with a 33-2 1 conquest of the Green
Bay Packers. The Bears were
sparked by Ed Brown's passing.
In Saturday night's action, de-
fending champion Cleveland's de-
fense proved too much for Pitts-
burgh, 14-10, and Philadelphia
came from behind to whip Wash-
ington, 13-9.

Maryland at Miami (Friday)
Navy at Tulane
Northwestern at Minnesota
Ohio St. at Illinois
Oregon at Washington
Purdue at Notre Dame
SMU at Duke
Texas vs Oklahoma
Texas Christian at Alabama
Vanderbilt at Mississippi
West Virginia at Syracuse
Wisconsin at Iowa

walloped his third home run of
the series.
The Yankees picked up an in-
surance run in the sixth on Andy
Carey's single, Larsen's sacrifice
and a single by Hank Bauer.
The Box Score

Campanela, c
Maglie, p
a Mitchell
Totals
a-Called out on
in 9th.
NEW YORK
Bauer, rf
Collins, lb
Mantle, cf
Berra, c
Slaughter, If
Martin, 2b
McDougaid, ss
Carey, 3b
Larsen, p
Totals
Brooklyn N
New York A

3 0 0 7 2
2 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0
27 0 0 24 10
strikes for Maglie

BROOKLYN
Gilliam, 2b
Reese, s
Snider, of
Robinson, 3b
Hodges, lb
Amoros, If
Furillo, rf

AB
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
0
4
0
0
0
a

0
2
4
1
2
5
3-
0

A
0
2
0
4
1
-0
0

AR R R
4 0 1
4 0 1
3 1 1
3 0 0
2 0' 0
3 0 1
2 0 0
2 0 0
26 2 5
000 0001

O A
4 0
7 0
4 0
7 0
10
3 4
0 2
S1
0 1
27 S
000-0

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

This Week's Games
Army at MICHIGAN
Auburn at Kentucky
Baylor at Arkansas
California at Oregon St.
Holy Cross at Penn St.
Indiana at Michigan St.
ansas at Iowa St.
SU at Ga. Tech.

Turkey Wins
First I=M
Soccer Game
The defending champions from
Turkey started off the Internation-
al Soccer League season by sound-
ly trouncing their Korean oppqn-
ents, 11-0, at Wines Field last Sun-
day afternoon.
Three of the Turks combined ef-
forts for the majority of their
country's 11 goals. Muzaffer Oz-
derler, Erdogan Ilkcagla and Metin
Dorahon each nudged three scores
past the Korean goalie.
The greatest individual show was
turned in by Armstrong Mensah
of the Gold Coast as he booted in
five of the International Eleven's
seven goals in their 7-1 defeat of
Burma.
In the other two contests played,
China defeated Thailand, 3-0, and
the English Language Ihstitute
won over Indo-Pakistan, 7-1. Lat-
via drew a bye weekend, as there
are nine teams in the league.
Thomas David, who is athletic
director of the league, reported:
that this fall's leagueis larger
than it has ever been, He also said
that he was pleased with the size
of the crowd that was present at
the eight matches Sunday.
SPECIALTY
CUTS FOR
COLLEGIANS
Try Us-
" 11 BARBERS
NO WAITING
The Daseola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theatre

000 101 O0X-2

SLEEPER IN TRADE AWAKES WITH BANG:
Weak-Kneed Larsen Prays as Tension Mounts in 9th
n st

Line Performs Admirably.. .
IT SHOULD BE MENTIONED here that the Wolverine line was stead-
fast throughout the game. It held the Spartans without a first down
until the last five minutes -of the first half and never allowed a;
Michigan State drive to cover as much ground as Michigan's four
thrusts of 48, 42, 41 and 45 yards.
Mike Rotunno deserves special mention for his brilliant blocking
and tackling;for the entire 60 minutes of play. And the remainder of
the first string line-ends Kramer and Tom Maentz, tackles Al
Sigman and Jim Orwig and guards Dick Hill and Mary Nyren-also
played some of the best football of their college careers.
IDepth was a factor, but it can be over-emphasized. Coach Bennie
Oosterbaan employed his first string for most of the game mainly
because it was so successful and it did not seem any the worse for
wear. Michigan State used its second and third string players - who
actually briught victory - chiefly because some first stringers were
injured and others were not performing satisfactorily.
Enough said about last Saturday. Now the spotlight turns to
this weekend when a highly-rated Army squad comes seeking revenge
for last year's 26-2 loss to the Wolverines
You can bet that Michigan will be ready for the Cadets, just as
it was for Michigan State. Even with possibly handicapping injuries to.
Kramer and Barr, the Wolverines can be expected to show added pro-
gress on their way to a very successful season.

NEW YORK OP)-"I was so weak
in the' knees out there in the ninth
inning, I thought I was going to
faint."
Big Don Larsen, admittedly "in
a daze," said he also mumbled a
little prayer for help before he
finally completed his perfect no-
hit, no-run, no man-on-first game
against the Dodgers in the fifth
World Series game.
"Main Objective To Win"
Larsen said he realized in the
seventh inning that he had a no-
hitter going, but added: "I didn't'
get nervous. My main object was
to win the game."
"The thing I wanted to do was
get out of the ninth inning," he

said. "Once I mumbled a little
prayer tomyself. I said, 'Please
help me get through this.'"
The towering righthander, a na-
tive of Michigan City, Ind., but
The University of Michigan's
women's swimming team will
hold its organizational meeting
tonight at 7:00 in the lobby of
the WAA pool. All coeds in-
terested in joining are invited
to attend.
--Blanche Mueller, mgr.
who now lives in San Diego, Calif.,
said nobody on the Yankee bench
mentioned that he had a perfect
game going.

"The only word said to me was
by Yogi Berra," Larsen said.
"Yogi hit me in the seat of the
pants and said, 'Go out there and
let's get the first batter.'"
The Yankee dressing room-the
dressing room of the "old pros"-
was bedlam for the first time dur-
ing the series.
Yogi grabbed Larsen around the
neck. Mickey Mantle, normally
quiet and retiring, let out a re-
sounding war whoop.
"Beautiful, beautiful," said Casey
Stengel, the Yankee manager, his
creased face breaking ito a broad
smile. "This kid is a good pitcher."
O'Malley Has Praise
Walter O'Malley, the president
of the Brooklyn Dodgers, came in.

"You beat us and I'm not happy
about that," he said, elbowing his
way through the crowd around
the beaming pitcher. "I have to
congratulate, you-do me a favor
will you? Sign this ball."
Larsen, who came to the Yan-
kees in December 1954 as a minor
part of the 18-player deal with
Baltimore which brought the Yan-
kees' Bob Turley, said .Berra's
crafty signal-calling and the Yan-
ke'es' fine defensive play deserve
equal credit for his feat.
"I was pitching fast balls and
sliders mostly," he said. "But
mainly I had pretty good control.
I only shook off a couple of Yogi's
signals, but he stuck with them,
so I went ahead and pitched what

FOR MEN WHO PREFER

gkle

HAWKS

NIGHT
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